Trey Gowdy

Trey Gowdy

SOUTH CAROLINA's 4th DISTRICT

Immigration Subcommittee to Examine DOJ’s Role in Crafting New Orleans Sanctuary Policy

2016/09/23

Washington, D.C. – On Tuesday, September 27, 2016 at 10:00 a.m., the Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee will hold a hearing titled, “New Orleans: How the Crescent City Became a Sanctuary City.” At the hearing, members will seek answers about the Justice Department’s involvement in crafting the New Orleans Police Department’s (NOPD) sanctuary policy.

In 2010, the mayor of the City of New Orleans requested the Justice Department to “reform” the NOPD.  In 2012, officials at DOJ’s Civil Rights Division sued the city for alleged civil rights violations, resulting in a consent decree joined by the parties.  As part of the consent decree, NOPD officers were prevented from considering an individual’s immigration status when performing their law enforcement duties.  In February 2016, the NOPD enacted written policies pursuant to the consent decree that prevent officers from responding to requests by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) regarding criminal aliens in custody, except in very limited circumstances. The Justice Department reviewed and approved those policies prior to their enactment by the NOPD, even though they appear to be in violation of federal law. And despite these concerning policies, the NOPD still continues to receive Department of Justice grant funds.

Earlier this year, Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee Chairman Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) pressed the Department of Justice on its involvement in the NOPD’s sanctuary policy, but to date the Department has failed to explain how the policy is lawful.       

Witnesses for the hearing are:

  • The Honorable Jeff Landry, Attorney General, Louisiana Department of Justice
  • The Honorable Vanita Gupta, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice
  • The Honorable Michael Horowitz, Inspector General, U.S. Department of Justice

Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee Chairman Gowdy and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Goodlatte issued the statement below in advance of this hearing 

“It is outrageous that the Justice Department would seek a consent decree with the New Orleans Police Department to actually inhibit the ability of the federal government to enforce federal law.  By hindering federal immigration officers’ ability to apprehend criminal aliens, the Justice Department consciously disregards the safety and security of the American public by enabling the release of these criminals back into our communities to commit more crimes. 

“Next week, the Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee will examine DOJ’s role in coercing the New Orleans Police Department to adopt dangerous sanctuary policies and will seek answers from the Department. We look forward to hearing their explanation as to why they would encourage a local jurisdiction to violate federal law.”

This hearing will take place in 2237 Rayburn House Office Building and will be webcast live at judiciary.house.gov.  Camera crews wishing to cover must be congressionally credentialed and RSVP with the House Radio-TV Gallery at (202) 225-5214. 

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Goodlatte & Gowdy Call on DHS to Revoke Citizenship for Those Who Should Have Been Deported

2016/09/22

Washington, D.C. – House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) and Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee Chairman Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) today called on Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Jeh Johnson to investigate and begin the process of revoking citizenship for people that obtained citizenship despite being ineligible and due to the Department’s systemic failures.

Earlier this month, the DHS Office of Inspector General (IG) issued a report finding that at least 858 individuals who were ordered deported were instead granted citizenship because they used another identity when applying for citizenship and were not caught by federal immigration authorities since their fingerprints were never digitized and uploaded to government databases. The IG report also found that about 148,000 fingerprint records have not been digitized for aliens with final deportation orders or who are criminals or fugitives.

In their letter to Secretary Johnson, Goodlatte and Gowdy call on the Department of Homeland Security to initiate a plan to investigate and refer for criminal prosecution and denaturalization proceedings each person identified in the IG’s report who has been granted citizenship based on fraudulent identity. They also call on DHS to provide information to the House Judiciary Committee about what it has done to remedy this systemic failure.

Below is the text of the letter. The signed copy can be found here.

 

September 22, 2016

The Honorable Jeh Johnson
Secretary
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Washington, D.C. 20528

 

Dear Secretary Johnson,

We write regarding the September 8, 2016, U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General (IG) report entitled, “Potentially Ineligible Individuals Have Been Granted U.S. Citizenship Because of Incomplete Fingerprint Records.” 
 
The IG report stated that, “USCIS granted U.S. citizenship to at least 858 individuals ordered deported or removed under another identity when, during the naturalization process, their digital fingerprint records were not in the DHS digital fingerprint repository, IDENT.”  In addition, the IG found that, “U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has identified about 148,000 older fingerprint records that have not been digitized of aliens with final deportation orders or who are criminals or fugitives.” Thus, still more individuals could have been naturalized despite their ineligibility to do so.   
 
Administration officials repeatedly tell those of us in Congress and the American people that the immigration benefits vetting process is robust and secure.  Concerns we raise about the process are continuously dismissed in favor of Administration actions to expand the scope of eligibility for immigration benefits.  
 
Yet time and time again, those concerns are proven valid.  Whether it is with the improper grant of a fiancée visa to an individual who goes on to commit a terrorist attack in California, or with the improper naturalization of hundreds of individuals whose fingerprints were never automated, there is no doubt that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ (USCIS) adjudication is not the secure and robust process that we are asked to believe. 
 
USCIS’ first responsibility is to the American people, and that responsibility is to ensure that foreign nationals approved for immigration benefits are, in fact, who they claim to be.  Without such elementary knowledge of the individuals seeking immigration benefits, the U.S. immigration system and any claimed security protections therein  are rendered useless.             
 
In addition, naturalization not only bestows rights and benefits to the individual naturalized, but also for their family members.  So through chain migration, one individual fraudulently naturalized can result in hundreds of additional naturalizations.  Such actions make a mockery of U.S. immigration law and policy.  
 
As you also know, federal law allows USCIS to refer an individual to the Department of Justice for denaturalization proceedings in the case of an individual who USCIS believes to have “illegally procured or procured by concealment of a material fact or by willful misrepresentation,” naturalization.  Federal law also allows such referrals for criminal prosecution. 
 
Thus, we request that you initiate a plan to investigate and refer for criminal prosecution and denaturalization proceedings, each individual in the group described by the IG to have been naturalized based on a fraudulent identity and despite having fingerprints that were not previously entered into the system.      
 
In addition, we request the following information:

1) For the 858 individuals who were found to have been naturalized despite being ordered deported or removed under a different identity:

  • How many have been investigated to determine whether they were truly eligible at the time of naturalization?
  • How many aliens have been naturalized or received other immigration benefits based on the U.S. citizenship status of the fraudulently naturalized individual?  What, if any, action has been taken to denaturalize or revoke immigration benefits from such individuals? 
  • How many have been referred to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) for criminal prosecution?
  • How many have been referred to DOJ for denaturalization proceedings?
  • Of the cases referred for criminal prosecution, how many cases has DOJ agreed to prosecute and how many have been prosecuted?  Please indicate the outcomes of any such prosecutions.
  • Of the cases referred for denaturalization proceedings, how many cases has DOJ agreed to take and how many proceedings have been initiated?  Please indicate the outcomes of those cases. 
  • How many have been determined, through investigation, to have been eligible for naturalization despite the fraud used to gain naturalization?  For each individual found to have been eligible, please indicate the reasons for such a finding.       
  • Please provide us monthly updated numbers on a) through g) above as the process continues.    

 2) For the 148,000 fingerprint records that have not been digitized of aliens with final deportation orders or who are criminals or fugitives:

  • What is your plan to investigate the number of those individuals who have been naturalized or have received other immigration benefits? 
  • Please provide monthly updated statistics regarding those of the 148,000 who were naturalized and the number who were naturalized under a new identity.   
  • Of the number who have already been naturalized, how many have been referred to DOJ for criminal prosecution?  How many has DOJ agreed to prosecute?
  • Of the number who have already been naturalized, how many have been referred to DOJ for denaturalization proceedings?  Against how many has DOJ agreed to begin denaturalization proceedings? 

Please respond to the above questions no later than October 5, 2016.  If you have questions regarding this letter, please contact Andrea Loving on the House Judiciary Committee staff at (202) 225-3926. 

We appreciate in advance, your prompt response.  


Sincerely,

  

 

Bob Goodlatte                                                                              Trey Gowdy

              Chairman                                                                       Sub Committee Chairman

 

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Gowdy Statement on Events in Tulsa, Charlotte

2016/09/22

Washington, DC - Congressman Trey Gowdy (SC-04) released the following statement in response to this week's tragic events in Tulsa, OK and Charlotte, NC:

"The shedding of innocent blood devastates all people of good conscience – but violence cannot begat violence. The frustration and anger felt when innocent citizens are killed by law enforcement officers or law enforcement officers are killed by citizens must result in swift and certain justice. But it must be justice – not vigilantism. This is why it is imperative we have a single justice system that treats each of us as we are – equal in the eyes of the law and our Creator. This justice system must be swift, certain, proportional and respected.  And it must be a single justice system with the same rules applying to each of us.  

Law cannot make people treat others with dignity, justice and respect. It is us who must decide our common decency, desire for law and order, respect for due process, and shared citizenry are larger than the desire to lash out. Hurting innocent people does not level the score – it merely breeds and perpetuates the enmity that begat the original violence.  

Through a series of roundtable discussions, Senator Tim Scott and I have assembled women and men of good conscience from all perspectives and backgrounds in South Carolina to first understand one another and then unite around the common goals of safety, security, peacefulness and justice. But these conversations are just one step toward building solutions. We must have a system of justice that is so respected it overwhelms the desire to take matters into our own hands. Hurting innocent people does nothing to break the cycle of violence and retribution so antithetical to a peaceful and ordered society."

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Protecting Americans at Home and Abroad

2016/09/16

Last November, Attorney General Loretta Lynch testified the law “currently does not allow” the transfer of Guantanamo Bay detainees to the United States. In January, Defense Secretary Ash Carter agreed. Additionally, last fall, the President signed into law the most recent National Defense Authorization Act, which included language to halt the transfer of detainees to U.S. soil. Nonetheless, President Obama continues to transfer detainees to other countries in an effort to close the prison before the end of his term.

According to the Director of National Intelligence, nearly one-third of detainees currently or formerly held at Guantanamo Bay are suspected or confirmed of re-engaging in terrorism. Today the House passed H.R. 5351, introduced by Rep. Jackie Walorski, which bans the transfer or release of detainees from Guantanamo Bay until either the end of this year or the enactment of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for fiscal year 2017. While the President is risking our national security to fulfill campaign promises he never should have made, Congress will continue to put our national security first.  

Last week, the House unanimously approved bipartisan legislation to protect survivors of sexual assault. The Survivors’ Bill of Rights Act of 2016, introduced by Representatives Mimi Walters and Zoe Lofgren, will ensure survivors of sexual assault receive basic rights including the preservation of crucial forensic evidence. 

Specifically, this legislation will ensure sexual assault survivors in federal criminal cases have a right to the following:

  • The performance of an exam and preservation of the evidence from that exam in an evidence kit
  • Written notice before the kit is destroyed
  • The preservation of the kit
  • Notice of important results from a forensic examination

As a former state and federal prosecutor, I have seen firsthand both the physical and emotional trauma experienced by victims of sexual assault. This bill ensures victims receive the justice and protection they deserve. I thank Representatives Walters and Lofgren for their steadfast commitment to ensuring survivors of sexual assault have a fair chance at justice.

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Gowdy Statement on the Anniversary of 9/11

2016/09/11

Washington, DC – Congressman Trey Gowdy (SC-04) issued the following statement on the anniversary of September 11:

“Fifteen years ago today, we experienced an inconceivable tragedy when terrorists attacked our nation simply because of who we are and what we stand for. In 2012, we experienced this evil once again when four Americans were killed in a terrorist attack while serving our country in Benghazi, Libya. Our thoughts and prayers are with all of the victims and their families today and every day. We will never forget.

Let us also remember the heroic law enforcement officers and medical units who responded to the attacks – those who rushed toward danger when the rest of us ran away from it. And thank you to our men and women in uniform who fiercely protected our freedom fifteen years ago, four years ago and have continued to do so every single day in between. Their love for and dedication to our nation serve as an inspiration to each and every one of us. 

The single best thing we can do to fight and ultimately overcome those who desire to tear our nation apart is to rally behind our love for our country and unite our great nation as one.”

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ICYMI: As nation ponders community policing, Scott and Gowdy hope S.C. can engage in the debate

2016/09/07

In case you missed it: take a look at how Senator Scott and I are working to build trust between law enforcement and community leaders in South Carolina.

As nation ponders community policing, Scott and Gowdy hope S.C. can engage in the debate

By Emma Dumain

During the August congressional recess, 12 U.S. House members — participants in a bipartisan group tasked with restoring trust between police and civilians — dialed into a conference call.

U.S. Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., provided an update on how his community was doing after Alton Sterling, a black man, was shot and killed by white policemen outside a convenience store in Baton Rouge.

U.S. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., shared local reactions to the news that the New York City Police commissioner was stepping down.

And U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., recalled the “homework assignment” he’d given to his working group colleagues: Talk to people you wouldn’t normally speak to, Gowdy said. Find someone who has had an experience unlike any you have known.

Hours after the conference call concluded, Gowdy was off to follow his own advice. He stepped into the Brookland Baptist Church in West Columbia, joined by U.S. Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., and nearly two dozen fellow South Carolinians — half of them from the faith community, half of them with careers in law enforcement; most of them non-white.

They were gathered for the first of what Gowdy and Scott hope will be many private meetings made up of the same community stakeholders all around the Palmetto State. The purpose is to share stories, trade ideas and most of all have a forum in which to speak candidly without fear of scrutiny from the public or by the media.

“First we establish credibility,” Scott said. “If you don’t establish the bond of trust, everything else is secondary.”

The two lawmakers are close friends who came up with the idea of forming the discussion group over the course of regular dinners together on Capitol Hill. The working group was formally convened in late July after a series of deadly clashes around the country between African-Americans and police officers necessitated some type of congressional response.

Their life experiences have informed their outlooks. Gowdy, who is white, previously served as the state’s 7th Circuit solicitor and approaches the criminal justice debate from a prosecutor’s perspective.

“I have never been stopped by law enforcement because of my race. Ever,” Gowdy said. “But the African-American pastors around that table have never likely had to sit with the parents of a homicide victim and heard why they have to resolve this case in a way that makes none of us happy because they can’t cooperate with the police. There are certain elements within certain communities where distrust for police and the criminal justice system is so great they will not even cooperate.”

Scott, who is black, recently delivered a series of Senate floor speeches about his experience with prejudice, describing painful confrontations with police officers even as an elected official. He is deeply committed to his faith and the extent that wounds can be healed through love — a theme he revisits when talking about the Emanuel AME Church shootings.

The thought of bringing representatives from churches and police departments together came from an observation Gowdy said he and Scott shared: “The most segregated hour in all of South Carolina is 11 o’clock on Sunday mornings.”

Both men insist their goal is not to walk away with a legislative proposal; that’s for the congressional working group. Rather, Gowdy and Scott want South Carolina to be a part of a national conversation about criminal justice and sentencing policy, about what residents and law enforcement can do to help each other do their jobs and live lives in peace.

In many ways South Carolina is already part of the debate. In April 2015, Walter Scott, a black man, was shot and killed by North Charleston officer Michael Slager following a scuffle during a traffic stop. Then in June, Dylann Roof, an avowed white supremacist, killed nine black parishioners at Emanuel AME. Both Slager and Roof await trial.

“We had an officer-involved shooting and the most serious charge that could be leveled, was leveled,” Gowdy said. “We had a horrific mass killing in Charleston, and the result was the exact opposite of what the perpetrator had intended. (Sen. Scott) always wants to stop and at least take an assessment of how far we have come, and then let’s tackle, ‘how we do go even farther?’ Clearly something already exists here. It’s about seizing what’s already there.”

Scott too was optimistic.

“We had a very fruitful conversation about who we are as South Carolinians,” he said of the first meeting. “One thing that we already recognize is that we are already a national model.”

Full article here: http://www.postandcourier.com/20160903/160909811/as-nation-ponders-community-policing-scott-and-gowdy-hope-sc-can-engage-in-the-debate

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As nation ponders community policing, Scott and Gowdy hope S.C. can engage in the debate

2016/09/06

During the August congressional recess, 12 U.S. House members — participants in a bipartisan group tasked with restoring trust between police and civilians — dialed into a conference call.

U.S. Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., provided an update on how his community was doing after Alton Sterling, a black man, was shot and killed by white policemen outside a convenience store in Baton Rouge.

U.S. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., shared local reactions to the news that the New York City Police commissioner was stepping down.

And U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., recalled the “homework assignment” he’d given to his working group colleagues: Talk to people you wouldn’t normally speak to, Gowdy said. Find someone who has had an experience unlike any you have known.

Hours after the conference call concluded, Gowdy was off to follow his own advice. He stepped into the Brookland Baptist Church in West Columbia, joined by U.S. Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., and nearly two dozen fellow South Carolinians — half of them from the faith community, half of them with careers in law enforcement; most of them non-white.

Read more here: http://www.postandcourier.com/20160903/160909811/as-nation-ponders-community-policing-scott-and-gowdy-hope-sc-can-engage-in-the-debate

 

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Gowdy Statement on FBI Releasing Clinton Investigation Summary

2016/09/06

Spartanburg, SC - Congressman Trey Gowdy (SC-04) released the following statement after the FBI released a summary of its investigation into former Secretary Clinton’s use of a private email server:

“The FBI selectively releasing Secretary Clinton’s interview summary is of little benefit to the public unless and until all relevant documents and witness interview summaries are released. The public is entitled to all relative information, including the testimony of the witnesses at Platte River Networks, the entity which maintained the private server. The public will find the timeline and witness responses and failures to respond instructive.”

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Faith leaders, law enforcement join SC’s Scott, Gowdy to discuss race, policing

2016/08/17

Two S.C. congressmen say South Carolinians must have a frank conversation about race and policing in an effort to curb incidents of violence like last summer’s slaying of nine African Americans at a Charleston church and shooting of an unarmed black North Charleston man by a white police officer.

To drive that discussion, U.S. Sen. Tim Scott, R-North Charleston, and U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-Spartanburg, invited S.C. faith and law enforcement leaders together Wednesday.

About 15 people participated in the private discussion at Brookland Baptist Church conference center with Scott and Gowdy – closed to the press to encourage guests to speak openly and honestly about their experiences, Scott and Gowdy’s offices said.

In an interview with The State after the meeting, Scott said he and Gowdy came up with the idea over meals in Washington, a place where the two friends and colleagues hash out difficult issues.

Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/news/politics-government/politics-columns-blogs/the-buzz/article96201007.html#storylink=cpy

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Trey Gowdy to be part of group examining practices, perceptions of police

2016/07/14

U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., is part of a newly formed congressional group that is meeting this week to examine police practices in the nation.

Gowdy is one of the 10 congressmen who make up the group. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., and ranking member Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., will lead the group, which will hold a private roundtable discussion Thursday in Washington, D.C.

The country was shocked last week by the fatal police shootings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, followed by the shooting deaths of five police officers during a protest in Dallas, Texas.

The goal of the working group is to discuss issues of police accountability and aggression toward law enforcement and work toward solutions.

Gowdy said he hopes to see an end to the killings. He cited the Dallas shootings as well as the death of Walter Scott, an unarmed black man shot and killed by a North Charleston police officer last year.

He said the discussions will help leaders gain understanding about perceptions of the criminal justice system.

"We need to have candid, frank conversations first so we can understand people's perspectives, then see if there's a legislative remedy," he said.

Gowdy said trusting the impartiality of the judicial system is essential to communities trusting law enforcement.

He recalled his former role as solicitor in Spartanburg County and the difficulty in getting witnesses to talk to law enforcement in homicide cases. If there's a two-track justice system, trust within minority communities is diminished, he said.

Read more here: http://www.goupstate.com/article/20160713/ARTICLES/160719876/1083/ARTICLES?p=1&tc=pg

 

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2016-09-22 15:53:10


Gowdy Questions IRS Commissioner Koskinen During Judiciary Hearing

2016-09-21 16:27:49


Gowdy Questions During FOIA Compliance Hearing

2016-09-08 19:31:57


Rep. Gowdy Questions AG Lynch on Clinton Emails

2016-07-12 18:21:13


Rep. Gowdy Questions Director Comey - Part Two

2016-07-07 18:51:24


Rep. Gowdy Questions FBI Director Comey

2016-07-07 16:41:22


Gowdy: Selective Use of Executive Privilege is Unacceptable

2016-05-17 16:06:25


Gowdy Honors Fallen Police Officers on House Floor

2016-05-12 22:07:25


Gowdy Questions DHS Official on Releasing Criminal Aliens

2016-04-28 18:39:54


Chairman Gowdy: We Are a Nation of Laws

2016-04-20 16:48:48


Gowdy: Illegal Immigration: Not a Victimless Crime

2016-04-19 14:33:17


Chairman Gowdy: One Person Does Not Make Law

2016-03-17 16:02:36


Chairman Gowdy: The President Does Not Make Law

2016-03-16 22:45:34


Gowdy Questions Apple During Encryption Hearing

2016-03-15 17:22:53


Gowdy Questions Director Comey at Encryption Hearing

2016-03-15 17:23:10


Gowdy: Benghazi Committee's "report is not about Hillary Clinton"

2016-02-22 19:49:32


Gowdy: Democrats on the Benghazi Committee have delayed investigation by refusing to help

2016-02-19 19:31:07


Gowdy: Illegal immigration is just that - illegal

2016-02-04 14:54:51


Benghazi Committee Democrats doing nothing but obstructing investigation

2016-01-31 16:09:57


Are we serious about enforcing our immigration laws?

2016-01-08 20:23:47


Contact Information

1404 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-6030
Fax 202-226-1177
gowdy.house.gov

Representing South Carolina’s 4th District, Trey Gowdy entered Congress with a resolute commitment to the conservative principles that have guided him throughout his years in public service. At the core of those principles lies a firm belief in a limited government that inspires trust and demands accountability.

Representative Gowdy serves on the House Committees on Education and the Workforce, Ethics, Judiciary, and Oversight and Government Reform. He also serves as Chairman of the Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security for the Judiciary Committee. In these capacities, Representative Gowdy has fought to highlight facts, uphold the Constitution, rein in the ever-expanding scope of the federal government, and restore America’s trust with a renewed spirit of honesty, fairness and reason.

Trey graduated from Spartanburg High School in 1982, Baylor University in 1986 with a degree in history, and the University of South Carolina School of Law in 1989 where he was a member of the scholastic honor society “Order of the Wig and Robe.”

For 6 years as a federal prosecutor, Trey prosecuted the full range of federal crimes including narcotics trafficking rings, bank robberies, child pornography cases, and the murder of a federal witness. He was awarded the Postal Inspector’s Award for the successful prosecution of J. Mark Allen, one of “America’s Most Wanted” suspects. He also received the highest performance rating a federal prosecutor can receive – two years in a row.

As 7th Circuit Solicitor, Trey led an office of 25 attorneys and 65 total employees. During his tenure, he started a Violence Against Women Task Force and a Worthless Check Program, enhanced and expanded Drug Court, and implemented a Drug Mother Protocol designed to assist expectant mothers break the cycle of addiction.

He has been recognized statewide for his commitment to victim’s rights and drunken driving enforcement and nationally for excellence in death penalty prosecutions.

Trey is married to Terri Dillard Gowdy, and they have two children: Watson and Abigail. Terri works for the Spartanburg School District as a teacher’s aide. Watson is a sophomore at Clemson University and Abigail is a rising 10th grader at Spartanburg High School. The Gowdy family also includes three dogs: “Judge”, “Jury”and “Bailiff.”


Serving With

Mark Sanford

SOUTH CAROLINA's 1st DISTRICT

Joe Wilson

SOUTH CAROLINA's 2nd DISTRICT

Jeff Duncan

SOUTH CAROLINA's 3rd DISTRICT

Mick Mulvaney

SOUTH CAROLINA's 5th DISTRICT

Tom Rice

SOUTH CAROLINA's 7th DISTRICT

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