Tim Walberg

Tim Walberg

MICHIGAN's 7th DISTRICT

Monroe News: Walberg discusses agriculture with Monroe County farmers

2017/01/23

IDA - About 25 area growers and Farm Bureau members discussed agricultural issues at an informal meeting with U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg Jan. 16 at the Monroe County Farm Bureau office.

The Republican congressman from Tipton sat in a circle and answered questions for more than an hour about the future of international trade and the ability for agriculture to sell its products overseas.

Roger Bezek of Maybee, one of the farmers who attended, said access to farm labor workers, the future of healthcare and possible reform of burdensome federal regulations were also discussed.

The incoming Congress is planning a busy five-day-a-week schedule to work with new President Donald Trump and the new Cabinet, Rep. Walberg told the participants.

Several growers present expressed their views with the congressman on reform of the Affordable Care Act, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations on WOTUS and employer- mandated verification of farm workers' documentation, Mr. Bezek said.

Growers from Carleton, Erie, Ida, Maybee and other parts of the county attended the meeting.

This article originally appeared in the January 23rd edition of the Monroe News. Read More

Detroit Free Press: Doing nothing on Obamacare is not an option

2017/01/20

By Tim Walberg, Mike Bishop, Paul Mitchell, Dave Trott

In 2010, Nancy Pelosi famously said of Obamacare, “We have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it.” Seven years later, we now know what’s in it: rising costs, fewer options and, for many, more uncertainty than ever before.

With a GOP majority in both chambers of Congress and a Republican president-elect, America stands at a crossroad. We can fix the problem, or we can maintain the status quo as the system collapses.

We have seen how the Affordable Care Act has driven up the cost of health care plans across the nation.

In 2014 alone, 8 million Americans paid the individual mandate tax penalty rather than purchase insurance. President Barack Obama’s promise that premiums would decline by $2,500 per family was woefully and willfully incorrect, as average premiums have risen. The average family’s employer-sponsored health care plan now costs more than $18,000 a year.

In Michigan, premiums for individuals are expected to climb nearly 17% in 2017. Last year, we saw deductibles rise an average of $492  across all plans on the exchange. And doing nothing will only make it worse. American families literally cannot afford for us to stand idly by.

In fact, eight in 10 Americans now favor changing Obamacare significantly or replacing it altogether.

In direct correlation to the rising health care costs, patient choice and access to care has declined — a blatant contradiction of Obama’s promise that “if you like your health care plan, you can keep it.” That’s because the very design of Obamacare has achieved the opposite result.

Many insurance providers have either raised rates on all customers or are dropping out of the exchanges altogether, forcing many Americans to change their plans. Other insurers have been forced to narrow their networks because of mounting regulations that limit the number of doctors and hospitals covered by a given plan. So now, not only are our choices limited, but fewer options exist altogether.

Because of Obamacare’s size, scope and failed design, replacing it will need to be a several-step process with a stable transition period. Through this process there will be tireless efforts to mislead and instill fear, but the system is broken and we must address it.

We will not return to the pre-Obamacare status quo, but we will increase choice and decrease costs. Patients and doctors will be in charge of their health care, not the federal government. There is a better way to address health care in our nation, and it’s going to take ideas and support from both parties to fix it.  Every representative has constituents who have been adversely affected by this law; doing nothing is not an option.

This is about making health care work for everyone.

U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg, a Republican from Tipton, represents Michigan’s 7th District. U.S. Rep. Mike Bishop, a Republican from Rochester, represents Michigan’s 8th District. U.S. Rep. Paul Mitchell, a Republican from Dryden, represents Michigan’s 10th District. U.S. Rep. Dave Trott, a Republican from Birmingham, represents Michigan’s 11th District. This op-ed originally appeared in the January 20 edition of the Detroit Free Press. Read More

Adrian Daily Telegram: Walberg and Dingell reintroduce VA bill

2017/01/18

WASHINGTON - Two of Michigan's members of Congress reintroduced on Thursday a bill aimed at compelling Veterans Affairs hospitals to report quarterly surgery statistics.

The VA Transparency and Enhancement Act of 2017 was reintroduced by U.S. Reps. Debbie Dingell, D-Dearborn, and Tim Walberg, R-Tipton. If passed into law, the bill will require VA medical facilities to provide more detailed reports about surgeries that are scheduled at their facilities to the Department of Veterans Affairs, which will summarize the data into reports it will provide to Congress and publish on its website.

Walberg and Dingell first introduced the act on March 26. Unfortunately, as members of Congress focused their energy on campaigning, the bill failed to make it out of committee for a vote in the House chamber.

"The bill was introduced last Congress in response to issues we heard about from constituents, but unfortunately there was not enough time left in the legislative calendar for the Veterans Affairs Committee to thoroughly review the bill," Dan Kotman, Walberg's communications director, said. "We are renewing our push again this year because reforms at the VA are desperately needed, and increasing transparency around quality of care is an important step we can take."

The bill arose out of a recurring contamination issue at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System that led to some surgeries being canceled and moved to other facilities. After meeting with VA officials, Dingell and Walberg were surprised to find out that VA facilities were not required to report on surgical infection rates or cancelations.

The bill would require each VA facility to record and submit information on the number of patients who contracted infections due to surgery as well as information about surgeries that were cancelled or transfered to other facilities, the reasons for the transfer and how many additional days the patient had to wait.

"To keep our promises to America's veterans, we need to increase transparency at VA hospitals so patients and the public know when quality of care standards are not being met," Walberg wrote in a news release. "The sooner we know about problem areas, the sooner we can work together to solve them. Our veterans must come first, and this bipartisan bill will help ensure our nation's heroes receive the highest quality care in a timely fashion."

Last month, the John D. Dingell VA Medical Center in Detroit was given one out of five stars by the VA's own internal rating system. VA undersecretary for health David Shulkin told USA TODAY that while there were other hospitals that were given one star in the VA's quarterly ranking system, Detroit's VA was the only facility in the country to not improve to a two-star rating and actually declined. Yet, Shulkin cautioned against using the list as a way to compare hospitals due to the complexity of the measurements used in coming up with a rating.

This news pushed Dingell and Walberg to reintroduce the bill for the 115th Congress. It also compelled them to write a letter to outgoing VA Secretary Robert MacDonald to ask why this rating information is not available to the public and what steps are being taken to fix the problem. The VA has since started to publish its facility ratings online.

Rather than being a burden on the VA and its medical care centers, Dingell and Walberg point out that private and public hospitals in the U.S. submit similar reports to the National Healthcare Safety Network. The two think the VA system should have similar standards.

"Veterans deserve to have faith in the care they receive at our nation's VA medical centers," Dingell wrote in a news release. "This is standard operating procedure for nearly every other hospital in the country, and the VA shouldn't be exempt. Improving transparency means that veterans can make informed decisions about the centers where they are seeking treatment, and ensure that hospitals are meeting the quality standards we owe our veterans. Ensuring the men and women who serve our country have timely, quality healthcare is a critical responsibility of the Congress, and this is one more important step to ensuring we address barriers to care." and moved to other facilities. After meeting with VA officials, Dingell and Walberg were surprised to find out that VA facilities were not required to report on surgical infection rates or cancelations.

The bill would require each VA facility to record and submit information on the number of patients who contracted infections due to surgery as well as information about surgeries that were canceled or transfered to other facilities, the reasons for the transfer and how many additional days the patient had to wait.

"To keep our promises to America's veterans, we need to increase transparency at VA hospitals so patients and the public know when quality of care standards are not being met," Walberg wrote in a news release. "The sooner we know about problem areas, the sooner we can work together to solve them. Our veterans must come first, and this bipartisan bill will help ensure our nation's heroes receive the highest quality care in a timely fashion."

Last month, the John D. Dingell VA Medical Center in Detroit was given one out of five stars by the VA's own internal rating system. VA undersecretary for health David Shulkin told USA TODAY that while there were other hospitals that were given one star in the VA's quarterly ranking system, Detroit's VA was the only facility in the country to not improve to a two-star rating and actually declined. Yet, Shulkin cautioned against using the list as a way to compare hospitals due to the complexity of the measurements used in coming up with a rating.

This news pushed Dingell and Walberg to reintroduce the bill for the 115th Congress. It also compelled them to write a letter to outgoing VA Secretary Robert MacDonald to ask why this rating information is not available to the public and what steps are being taken to fix the problem. The VA has since started to publish its facility ratings online.

Rather than being a burden on the VA and its medical care centers, Dingell and Walberg point out that private and public hospitals in the U.S. submit similar reports to the National Healthcare Safety Network. The two think the VA system should have similar standards.

"Veterans deserve to have faith in the care they receive at our nation's VA medical centers," Dingell wrote in a news release. "This is standard operating procedure for nearly every other hospital in the country, and the VA shouldn't be exempt. Improving transparency means that veterans can make informed decisions about the centers where they are seeking treatment, and ensure that hospitals are meeting the quality standards we owe our veterans. Ensuring the men and women who serve our country have timely, quality healthcare is a critical responsibility of the Congress, and this is one more important step to ensuring we address barriers to care."

This article originally appeared in the January 18 edition of the Adrian Daily Telegram. Read More

Walberg: Budget Resolution First Step to Provide Obamacare Relief

2017/01/13

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) released the following statement after voting for a budget resolution that gives Congress the legislative tools to begin the process of repealing and replacing Obamacare with a better health care system.  
 
“Under Obamacare, too many Americans have lost their doctor or plan and seen their premiums and deductibles skyrocket—exactly the opposite of what was promised. Obamacare is collapsing and it’s time to fix our broken health care system. Today’s vote is the first step towards providing relief and putting in place health care solutions that expand choices, lower costs, and give patients and doctors greater control. As we move through this step-by-step process, we must ensure an orderly and stable transition to a health care system that works for everyone.” Read More

Walberg Selected as Chairman of Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions

2017/01/13

Washington, D.C. – Today, House Education and the Workforce Committee Chairwoman Virginia Foxx announced the selection of Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) to serve as Chairman of Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions for the 115th Congress.

“Working families in Michigan and across the country are looking for solutions to build a healthy economy, reduce regulations to encourage growth and innovation, and make health care more affordable and accessible,” said Walberg. “As Chairman of Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions, I’m committed to tackling these challenges and fighting to improve the lives of the people we represent.”

“Tim Walberg is a dedicated public servant, and I am delighted we will continue to benefit from his knowledge, experience, and strong leadership. Tim will be at the forefront of our efforts to roll back the regulatory onslaught that’s been crushing families and small businesses. He will also play a leading role as we advance responsible solutions that benefit the best interests of workers and employers,” said Chairwoman Foxx.

Read More

Walberg, Dingell Introduce Legislation to Enhance Transparency at VA Hospitals

2017/01/12

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Representatives Tim Walberg (MI-07) and Debbie Dingell (MI-12) today reintroduced the VA Transparency Enhancement Act, which would require VA hospitals to improve reporting of infection rates, surgical cancellations, and other issues impacting quality of care. Public and private hospitals are required to report a variety of quality measures to the National Healthcare Safety Network, including surgical infections. The VA Transparency Enhancement Act will bring VA reporting requirements more in line with other hospitals, and require them to report on surgical cancellations and the impact on patients for the first time.

“To keep our promises to America’s veterans, we need to increase transparency at VA hospitals so patients and the public know when quality of care standards are not being met,” said Walberg. “The sooner we know about problem areas, the sooner we can work together to solve them. Our veterans must come first, and this bipartisan bill will help ensure our nation’s heroes receive the highest quality care in a timely fashion.”

“Veterans deserve to have faith in the care they receive at our nation’s VA medical centers,” said Dingell. “This is standard operating procedure for nearly every other hospital in the country, and the VA shouldn’t be exempt. Improving transparency means that veterans can make informed decisions about the centers where they are seeking treatment, and ensure that hospitals are meeting the quality standards we owe our veterans. Ensuring the men and women who serve our country have timely, quality healthcare is a critical responsibility of the Congress, and this is one more important step to ensuring we address barriers to care.”

The VA Transparency Enhancement Act would require the Department of Veterans Affairs to report quarterly to Congress on the number of patients who contracted an infection as a result of a surgery and the number of surgeries cancelled or transferred by the VA. While the VA currently provides completed and pending appointment data from local VA medical facilities to the public monthly, the VA does not publically release data on rates of infection or cancelled or transferred surgeries. 

Dingell and Walberg first introduced the legislation in 2016 after an ongoing contamination issue at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System led to surgeries for veterans being intermittently canceled or moved to different hospitals. In meeting with VA leadership on the issue, the Representatives learned that VA hospitals are not required to report on surgical infection and cancellation rates, and that other reporting requirements can be improved as well. 

The need for increased transparency was underscored again in late 2016, when press reports revealed that the Detroit VA Medical Center had become a one-star facility based on an internal quality-of-care rating system used by the VA. Dingell and Walberg sent a letter to VA Secretary Robert McDonald seeking answers about steps being taken to improve performance and quality of care and questioning why the information was not available to the public. The VA has since posted the ratings on its website, allowing the public to see for the first time how their local VA hospitals have performed over time. 

Read More

Detroit Free Press: Legislators want more health data from VA hospitals

2017/01/12

WASHINGTON – U.S. Reps. Debbie Dingell and Tim Walberg of Michigan have reintroduced legislation which requires Veterans Affairs hospital to provide reports on infection rates, surgical cancellations and other quality of care matters.

Dingell, D-Dearborn, and Walberg, R-Tipton, had previously proposed the legislation last year after concerns were raised about surgical cancellations due to particulate matter being found on surgical equipment trays at a VA center in Ann Arbor.

“Veterans deserve to have faith in the care they receive,” said Dingell. “This is standard operating procedure for nearly every other hospital in the country, and the VA shouldn’t be exempt.”

“To keep our promises to America’s veterans, we need to increase transparency at VA hospitals so patients and the public know when quality of care standards are not being met,” said Walberg. “The sooner we know about problem areas, the sooner we can work together to solve them.”

The legislation, if passed by both the U.S. House and Senate, would require the Department of Veterans Affairs to report every three months to Congress on the number of patients contracting an infection as a result of surgery and the number of surgeries cancelled or transferred by the agency.

The two said public and private hospitals are already required to report a variety of quality measures to the National Healthcare Safety Network, including surgical infections but that VA hospitals do not publicly release that data, though they do provide information on pending and completed appointments and waiting times.

This article originally appeared in the January 12 edition of the Detroit Free Press. Read More

Walberg Recognizes National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day

2017/01/09

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) released the following statement in honor of National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day on January 9th.
 
“Today, and every day, the men and women in law enforcement deserve our deepest gratitude for all they do to keep our communities safe. Each day when they walk out the door, they risk their lives to protect ours. Tragically, we’ve lost too many officers in the line of duty, and we always remember their sacrifice and the loved ones they left behind. I encourage people in Michigan and across the country to show their support for law enforcement today—wear blue clothing, display a blue light, or say a simple word of thanks to a police officer in your neighborhood.”
 
To learn more about National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, click here.
 
Read More

Hillsdale Daily News: Walberg legislation passes the house

2017/01/06

WASHINGTON D.C. - After being sworn in on Tuesday it was off to work for the 115th Congress.

Congressman Tim Walberg (R-MI) introduced the first piece of legislation the Taxpayers Right-To-Know Act on Tuesday. The legislation was then passed unanimously on Wednesday.

The legislation H.R. 71, will provide the American people with a better understanding of how their tax dollars are spent. It requires each federal agency to annually report online and inventory of its federal programs and provide a description and cost of each program.

Senator James Lankford (R-OK) is leading this effort in the Senate.

"Increasing transparency and collecting better data is the first step towards eliminating redundant and wasteful spending," Walberg said. "Washington must be held accountable, and shining a light on overlapping and inefficient federal programs is a common sense way to save taxpayer money. I'm proud to start the new year on a strong note fighting for Michigan taxpayers."

Walberg was also selected to serve on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce for the 115th Congress. The oldest standing legislative committee in the U.S. House of Representatives, the Committee has responsibility for the nation's telecommunications, consumer protection, food and drug safety, public health research, environmental quality, energy policy and interstate and foreign commerce.

"From health care to energy to telecommunications, the Energy and Commerce Committee has broad jurisdiction over issues of great importance to Michigan families and all Americans," Walberg said. "In this new role, I look forward to playing a central part in our work to restore patient-centered health care, streamline burdensome regulations, and unleash innovation and job growth."

Representative Fred Upton said Walberg is a workhorse and a top-notch legislator.

"It's his keen understanding of what we need to do to improve the lives of middle-class families here in Michigan that will make him such a great addition to the Energy and Commerce team," Upton said. "We're excited to have him on board."

This article originally appeared in the January 6 edition of the Hillsdale Daily News. Read More

Walberg Votes for REINS Act to Curb Costly Red Tape

2017/01/05

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) voted today for the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act to reduce unaccountable, unnecessary red tape that hinders economic growth and job creation. The REINS Act gives Congress an up or down vote on any major new federal regulation with an economic impact of $100 million or more.
 
“Out of control regulations handed down by unelected bureaucrats are holding back economic growth and making life more expensive for Michigan families and small businesses,” said Walberg. “This type of unchecked rulemaking that ignores real world impacts has gone on for too long. The REINS Act will bring more accountability to the regulatory process and help ensure the people have a say before more costly red tape is thrown their way.”  Read More

Loading legislation ... one moment please
Loading votes ... one moment please

Walberg Urges Senate to Confirm Betsy DeVos for Education Secretary

2017-01-13 14:18:45


Walberg Highlights 2017 Auto Show on House Floor

2017-01-10 17:46:21


House Passes Walberg Transparency Bill to Begin New Congress

2017-01-04 18:06:25


Serving You in 2016

2016-12-16 15:53:32


Walberg Presses for Answers on Wasteful Defense Spending

2016-12-08 21:12:05


Walberg Questions DOJ, DEA Officials on Asset Forfeiture Abuse

2016-12-01 14:28:37


Walberg: 21st Century Cures Offers Hope, Healthier Future

2016-11-30 19:00:35


WLNS: Walberg Speaks at Human Trafficking Forum at Jackson College

2016-10-13 14:37:46


WTOL: Lenawee students hear about heroin epidemic

2016-10-11 13:55:27


WLNS: Walberg Honors Eaton County Vietnam Veterans

2016-10-05 16:11:54


Regulatory Relief for Small Businesses, Schools, and Nonprofits Act

2016-09-29 00:00:57


Walberg Speaks in Support of Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

2016-09-28 21:47:49


Walberg: Michigan Ports and Harbors Drive Economic Growth

2016-09-28 21:49:05


Walberg Recognizes Mohr Family from Lenawee County as Angels in Adoption

2016-09-22 17:02:56


WILX: Walberg, Lawmakers Grill EpiPen CEO

2016-09-22 18:06:14


Walberg Questions Mylan CEO About Rising Price of EpiPens

2016-09-21 22:52:01


13abc: Walberg hosts heroin epidemic forum at Bedford High School

2016-09-20 14:19:20


WTOL: Forum at Bedford High School addresses heroin and opioid epidemic

2016-09-20 14:19:15


Walberg Champions Bipartisan Good Government Transparency Bill

2016-09-14 20:30:50


Walberg Works to Boost Workforce Training, Create 21st Century Jobs

2016-09-13 19:18:01


Contact Information

2436 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-6276
Fax 202-225-6281
walberg.house.gov

Tim Walberg is currently serving his third term in Congress as the representative of south-central Michigan.  The diverse constituency of Michigan’s 7th District encompasses Branch, Eaton, Hillsdale, Jackson, Lenawee, and Monroe Counties, along with parts of Washtenaw County.  Since first taking office, Tim has hosted hundreds of coffee and town hall meetings to better understand the thoughts and concerns of the district.

Prior to his time in public office, Tim served as a pastor in Michigan and Indiana, as president of the Warren Reuther Center for Education and Community Impact, and as a division manager for Moody Bible Institute.  He also served in the Michigan House of Representatives from 1983 to 1999, and is proud to bring his reputation as a principled legislator, fiscal reformer, and defender of traditional values to Washington.

In the 113th Congress, Tim serves on the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chair of the Workforce Protections Subcommittee.  In addition, he serves on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

He and his wife, Sue, have been married for over 39 years, and enjoy spending time outdoors and riding on their Harley. They live in Tipton, Michigan, where they raised their three children: Matthew, Heidi and Caleb.


Serving With

Dan Benishek

MICHIGAN's 1st DISTRICT

Bill Huizenga

MICHIGAN's 2nd DISTRICT

Justin Amash

MICHIGAN's 3rd DISTRICT

John Moolenaar

MICHIGAN's 4th DISTRICT

Fred Upton

MICHIGAN's 6th DISTRICT

Mike Bishop

MICHIGAN's 8th DISTRICT

Candice Miller

MICHIGAN's 10th DISTRICT

Dave Trott

MICHIGAN's 11th DISTRICT

Recent Videos