Tim Walberg

Tim Walberg

MICHIGAN's 7th DISTRICT

Walberg Leads Bipartisan, Bicameral Bill to Ease Burdensome Occupational Licensing Requirements

2017/04/26

Washington, D.C. – Today, U.S. Representatives Tim Walberg (R-MI-07) and Henry Cuellar (D-TX-28) introduced a bipartisan occupational licensing reform bill that will give state governments tools to help initiate reforms to ensure bureaucratic requirements are not creating unnecessary barriers for those seeking to enter the workforce. U.S. Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Gary Peters (D-MI) introduced companion legislation in the U.S. Senate. The New Hope and Opportunity through the Power of Employment Act (New HOPE Act) will help states decide if they want to eliminate or reduce burdensome licensing requirements that are serving as an impediment to job creation. The legislation is based on an amendment Rep. Walberg championed last Congress as part of the House-passed Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act.
 
“The web of occupational licensing requirements are some of the most burdensome obstacles for aspiring workers and entrepreneurs,” said Rep. Walberg. “Too often, the scope and complexity of these regulations go beyond their intended purpose and place unnecessary barriers on individuals trying to use their skills to earn a paycheck or grow a small business. This bipartisan, bicameral bill gives states additional tools to implement reforms that reduce excessive licensing requirements and boost opportunities for job creation.”
 
“When most Americans think of professions that require government certifications, they probably picture airline pilots, electricians, or doctors,” said Rep. Cuellar. “However, more than a quarter of all American workers need some kind of government license for their jobs these days, from hair stylists to florists – and the requirements vary widely from state to state. In Texas, getting those licenses requires an average $304 in fees, 326 days of training, and two exams. Yet often these expensive requirements do not actually protect consumers; they are intentional efforts from people already in a given profession, to make it harder for new folks to compete with them. This legislation will give governors the flexibility to remove licensing requirements that just don’t make sense. It will create a better environment for entrepreneurs to create jobs. And it will save time and money for working people in thousands of occupations.”
 
“Every day job seekers in certain professions face bureaucratic hurdles like costly fees and unnecessary training time,” Sen. Cornyn said. “By equipping state leaders with tools to eliminate or reduce burdensome licensing requirements, we can give more folks across the country a chance to pursue good-paying jobs that can lead to meaningful careers.”
 
“Too many Americans are unable to obtain jobs because of the excessive hurdles to gain a required license,” said Sen. Peters. “This bipartisan legislation will give states the flexibility to streamline the licensing process and reduce the barriers to good-paying jobs that enable workers to provide for their families, send their kids to school and save for retirement.”
 
Background on New HOPE Act:
 
Overly burdensome and unnecessary state licensing mandates can require an individual to first pay fees, complete education and training programs, and even sometimes pass exams before they can enter some of the very professions most suitable to giving them a chance at meaningful work. Many of these licenses have little grounding in protecting public safety. States should review these occupational licensing regulations to ensure they are promoting opportunity and fostering a regulatory climate that encourages entrepreneurship and job creation.  
 
The bill provides additional authority to state governors receiving an existing, bipartisan appropriation of discretionary funds for career and technical education, giving them the discretion to use this money for the “identification, consolidation, or elimination of licenses or certifications which pose an unnecessary barrier to entry for aspiring workers and provide limited consumer protection.”

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Walberg Announces 2017 Congressional Art Competition

2017/04/10


Jackson, Mich.
 – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) is seeking submissions from high school students in the 7th District for the 2017 Congressional Art Competition. The winning piece of artwork will be displayed in the Cannon Tunnel to the U.S. Capitol, along with the winners from the other congressional districts across the country. 

“Each year I continue to be impressed by the incredibly talented students that hail from Michigan’s 7th District. I’m excited to see the submissions for this year’s art competition and look forward to putting their creative abilities on display for a national audience,” said Congressman Walberg.

Entries should be photographed and emailed along with a typed copy of the 2017 Student Release Form to Leeann.Yamakawa@mail.house.gov in Congressman Walberg’s office by midnight on Wednesday, May 3, 2017. The size of the artwork should not exceed 26” high x 26” wide x 4" deep, including the frame. For more information on exact guidelines for artwork submissions and a link to the 2017 Student Release form, please visit walberg.house.gov or call 517-780-9075.

Last year’s winning piece of artwork, entitled “Salvador Dali,” was created by Carter Gough of Grand Ledge High School.  Read More

Jackson Cit Pat: Rolling back red tape and unleashing economic growth

2017/04/09

One of the consistent concerns I hear from small businesses and manufacturers as I travel the 7th District is the endless regulatory onslaught coming out of Washington, D.C.

For too long, unelected bureaucrats in the federal government's expansive agencies and departments have imposed ill-conceived and excessive rules with little to no consideration about the real-world impact on every sector of our economy.

Outside our nation's capital, this avalanche of red tape has made life more expensive for Michigan families, farmers, and small businesses and has been an obstacle to wage and job growth.

The statistics are staggering. In the past eight years, the Obama administration handed down more than 3,000 regulations resulting in an $890 billion regulatory burden on taxpayers, according to the American Action Forum. In 2016, the administration's sweeping regulatory output set a record for the most major rules in one year in history.

Fortunately, Congress is working to reverse this aggressive overregulation at the federal level, understanding that regulatory reform is a key component to more robust economic growth.

So far this year, the House has voted to overturn more than 15 harmful regulations rushed through during the waning months of the Obama administration. Using a legislative tool known as the Congressional Review Act, or CRA, we've rolled back some of the most damaging 11th hour Obama-era regulations. Taken together, these actions will save an estimated 4.2 million hours of paperwork burdens and $3.7 billion in regulatory costs.

The House also passed the REINS Act to put a check on overreaching bureaucrats and curb costly red tape. The bill's premise is simple: Before a major rule with an economic impact of $100 million or more goes effect, the people's representatives in Congress should put it to an up or down vote. Doing so will increase accountability and protect our economy from job-killing regulations that the people never voted for in the first place.

To bring greater transparency to the rulemaking process, the House passed my bill, the Regulatory Integrity Act. It requires federal agencies to post, in a central location, all the communications they issue during the proposed rule stage so that Americans can fully participate and trust that the process is neutral and unbiased. The bipartisan bill will help ensure agencies are genuinely asking for and considering constructive feedback from the public, not advocating for a predetermined outcome.

An overhaul of our nation's regulatory system is long overdue. When done right and responsibly, regulations play a necessary role in the safety and wellbeing of our communities. When done in a harmful and heavy-handed way, regulations go beyond their intended purpose and stand in the way of innovation and a healthy economy.

We need to restore the right balance, return power to the people, and provide relief to families and small businesses. If we do that, we can put an end to Washington's regulatory micromanagement and begin to unleash the full potential of America's economy.

- U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg, R-Tipton, represents the 7th Congressional District and is a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the House Education and the Workforce Committee. This op-ed originally appeared in the April 9 edition of the Jackson Citizen Patriot.

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WLNS: Jackson County teen raises awareness for muscular dystrophy

2017/04/06


Walberg Welcomes Dream Foundation Recipient from Jackson County to Washington, D.C.

2017/04/05

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) today welcomed Brandon Martz and his family from Jackson County to Washington, D.C. to help fulfill Brandon’s dream of visiting our nation’s capital. The trip was made possible with the help of the Dream Foundation, the only national dream-granting organization for terminally-ill adults. Eighteen-year-old Brandon has been battling Duchenne muscular dystrophy since the age of four. Click here for pictures of Brandon’s visit to the U.S. Capitol and here for video of Congressman Walberg's remarks on the House floor.

“It was an honor to welcome Brandon, his brother, and his parents to our nation’s capital and be part of turning his dream into a reality,” said Congressman Walberg. “Brandon is an inspiration and I was moved by his courage and fight to raise awareness about muscular dystrophy. I hope this week offers the Martz family an opportunity to create many lasting memories together.”

During a tour of the U.S. Capitol, Speaker Paul Ryan met with the Martz family on the speaker’s balcony. In addition to today’s visit to the U.S. Capitol, Brandon and his family are touring the White House, Pentagon, Arlington National Cemetery, and other monuments and museums this week.

Last year, Brandon’s parents, Doug and Cinni, wrote a letter to Congressman Walberg about their son’s rare disease and participation in a clinical trial. When the House was debating the 21st Century Cures Act in November 2016, Congressman Walberg shared Brandon’s story on the House floor and spoke about the need to expedite the development of new cures by prioritizing medical research and streamlining the FDA approval process. Click here for video

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House Passes Walberg's Small Business Health Fairness Act

2017/03/22

Washington, D.C. – The House of Representatives today passed the Small Business Health Fairness Act (H.R. 1101), legislation that would expand health care coverage and lower costs for working families. Introduced by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI), chairman of the Education and the Workforce Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions, and Rep. Sam Johnson (R-TX), chairman of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Social Security, the legislation empowers small businesses to band together though association health plans (AHPs) and negotiate for lower health insurance costs on behalf of their employees. Click here to watch Rep. Walberg's remarks on the House floor.

“Providing more health care options for small businesses is essential to expanding affordable coverage for America’s workers,” Rep. Walberg said. “When it comes to accessing high-quality health care coverage, small businesses should not be treated any differently than large corporations and unions. This bill will level the playing field for small businesses, and it’s one step toward achieving a competitive health care marketplace that stretches across state lines. These are exactly the types of positive reforms that we’ve promised — reforms that will deliver more choices and lower health care costs for working families. I’d like to thank my colleague Representative Johnson for championing this important legislation for years, and I look forward to continuing our efforts to provide the American people a better way on health care.”

“As someone who owned and ran a small business between my time in the Air Force and serving in Congress, I understand the challenges other small business owners face,” Rep. Johnson said. “For years, I’ve fought for AHPs to level the playing field so that these job creators can offer their employees more health care options at better costs.  When Obamacare hit and small businesses suffered, AHPs became even more important.  In fact, this bill is a central part of the effort to replace this bad law with commonsense solutions that help American families.  I thank Chairman Walberg for his strong support of this effort, and I look forward to seeing our bill signed into law.  Better access to affordable health care is something all Americans want, need, and deserve.”  

“The House has taken an important step forward in our efforts to replace Obamacare with positive solutions that put working families first,” Education and the Workforce Committee Chairwoman Virginia Foxx (R-NC) said. "These commonsense reforms will empower small businesses to purchase high-quality health care coverage at a lower cost for their employees — including across state lines. This is a win for the hardworking Americans who are struggling with soaring costs and deserve more affordable health care options. An important part of our three-phase plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, this vote reflects our commitment to delivering free-market, patient-centered reforms. I’d like to thank my colleagues Representative Johnson and Representative Walberg for leading this effort on behalf of our nation’s workers and small businesses.”

BACKGROUND: Due to their size and economies of scale, large businesses and labor organizations have the ability to negotiate on behalf of employees for high-quality health care at more affordable costs. By offering a qualified group health plan under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), these large employers and labor organizations are also exempt from myriad state rules and regulations on health insurance.

Small businesses, however, do not have the same bargaining power as larger businesses. Small businesses are also unable to band together to increase their bargaining power in the health insurance marketplace. By allowing small businesses to join together through association health plans (AHPs), small businesses can have greater ability to negotiate for lower health care costs for their employees. 

Part of a broader effort to replace Obamacare with patient-centered solutions, Chairmen Walberg and Johnson introduced the Small Business Health Fairness Act. The legislation would empower small businesses to join together through AHPs to offer health insurance for their employees at a lower cost. Through these reforms, H.R. 1101 will:

  • Increase small businesses’ bargaining power with insurance providers and put them on a more level playing field with larger companies and unions.
  • Expand affordable coverage for working families who want to purchase health insurance through their employer.
  • Lower administrative costs for small businesses that face limited resources and want to provide health insurance to their employees.
  • Provide important protections to ensure plans are sustainable and individuals can count on their health care coverage when they need it.
  • Allow small businesses in different states to join together through a group health plan — a step toward purchasing insurance across state lines.

To read the bill, click here.  

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Wall Street Journal: Save Small Business from Obamacare

2017/03/21

By Reps. Sam Johnson (R-TX) and Tim Walberg (R-MI)

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini warned last month that the Affordable Care Act is in a “death spiral.” Because ObamaCare is failing, we are debating how best to repeal and replace it. But amid this debate, it’s important to remember the people ObamaCare is hurting.

Here is what Kathy, who owns a company in Missouri, told the House Ways and Means Committee: “As a small business owner, I recall the days before the ACA when we would receive a 2-inch notebook that contained multiple quotes from different health insurance companies. Now, our options are listed on a single legal sized sheet of paper. We only received three quotes for 2017, and just two of them were adequate for our region. In 2013, our insurance cost $180,000 for 92 lives with a $2,000 deductible. In 2016, we paid $252,000 for just 61 lives who face a $5,000 deductible.”

Her story, unfortunately, is not unique. Under ObamaCare’s costly regulations, many business owners must make hard choices between cutting back employees’ hours, laying off staff, or dropping health-care coverage (and then paying a penalty for doing so if the firm has more than 50 workers). Among businesses with fewer than 10 employees, 35.6% offered health insurance in 2008. That figure had fallen by 2015 to 22.7%, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

Even worse, a January report from the American Action Forum found that since ObamaCare became law, “among small businesses, the rise in premiums has been associated with $19 billion in lost wages, 10,130 fewer business establishments, and nearly 300,000 lost jobs.” That’s a big problem for American families, particularly since small businesses are responsible for 55% of all jobs and 66% of all net new jobs.

Repealing ObamaCare is necessary and would certainly help small businesses grow and hire new workers. But Congress should also help these job-creators provide affordable health-care options to their employees. That’s why we introduced the Small Business Health Fairness Act, which the House is scheduled to vote on this week.

The legislation is built on a basic rule of insurance: The bigger the risk pool, the lower the premium. That’s why large corporations and unions have an advantage in providing health insurance to their employees and members. Our bill would allow small businesses to band together through association health plans, or AHPs, to provide good policies for workers and their families at a lower cost.

AHPs could function in one of two ways: They could work directly with an insurer to negotiate better rates. Or they could self-fund, just as many large corporations and unions already do. Self-funded plans would also be exempted from many costly state and federal requirements, just as many corporate and union plans are.

To ensure the success and fairness of AHPs, our bill includes requirements that would provide accountability, stability, and consistency across the country. Any active marketing by an AHP sponsor would have to be directed at all its members, regardless of their claims history or health status. AHPs would be restricted from setting premiums in a way that might raise costs for higher-claims companies compared with similarly situated employers in the plan.

As House Republicans work to repeal ObamaCare and alleviate the burden it places on Americans across the country, we hope that AHPs can be a central part of the effort. Passing our bill is a common-sense way to give small-businesses the same economies of scale in health insurance that Fortune 500 companies enjoy—with the result being more affordable coverage for workers and their families.

This op-ed originally appeared in the March 21 edition of the Wall Street Journal. Read More

Ann Arbor News: 'Jessie's Law' named after Ann Arbor woman who died of opioid overdose

2017/03/18

ANN ARBOR, MI - U.S. Reps. Tim Walberg and Debbie Dingell, along with other members of Congress, have reintroduced "Jessie's Law," a bipartisan bill named after Ann Arbor resident Jessie Grubb, who died of an opioid overdose.

Jessie's Law would help ensure doctors have access to a consenting patient's prior history of addiction in order to make fully informed care and treatment decisions. Providing that information, the lawmakers argue, would help prevent tragic incidents like what happened to Grubb, a recovering addict who was prescribed a powerful opioid that led to her death last March.

The 30-year-old from West Virginia was here recovering from a seven-year heroin addiction and was said to be clean and getting her life back on track when she underwent hip surgery at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in February 2016.

She previously had been in treatment at Dawn Farm, a local addiction treatment and recovery center. After leaving Dawn Farm, she remained in Ann Arbor, a city she grew to love.

According to the lawmakers sponsoring Jessie's Law, her parents informed hospital personnel she was a recovering addict, but that message never made it to the doctor who discharged her. She left with a prescription for 50 oxycodone pills and fatally overdosed by the next day.

Authorities believe Grubb crushed up the oxycodone pills, mixed them with liquid and injected them into an IV port, causing a fatal overdose.

"In communities across Michigan and the United States, too many of our friends, neighbors and family members are struggling with drug addiction," Walberg, R-Tipton, said in a statement.

"Jessie's story is a heartbreaking example of needlessly losing a loved one to this battle. It is vital for medical professionals to have access to the information that they need about their patient's history so they can provide safe treatment and proper care. This bipartisan bill will make a real difference in fighting back against the deadly opioid epidemic and help save lives in our communities."

Jessie's Law also was reintroduced last week in the U.S. Senate by Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore, two senators from West Virginia, with the help of Jessie's parents from West Virginia, David and Kate Grubb.

The lawmakers from West Virginia, along with Dingell and Walberg, also tried introducing Jessie's Law last April, but it didn't make it out of Congress.

"As one who has witnessed firsthand all spectrums of this issue, I believe this bill is one of the most important steps we can take in developing effective strategies to protect families and save lives," Dingell, D-Dearborn, said in a statement.

Dingell said her father suffered from opioid addiction much of his life and she lost her sister to a drug overdose 12 years ago.

"I know the horrible pain of living with family members with addiction and the constant ache of losing someone you love," she said.

"We have a responsibility to confront this epidemic for families like Jessie's, and it is important that in our discussions to seek solutions, educate and prevent abuse that we ensure we do not stigmatize those with real and legitimate needs."

A member of the Bipartisan Task Force to Combat the Heroin Epidemic, Walberg continues to collaborate with stakeholders at the local, state, and federal level to raise awareness and develop best practices to fight heroin and opioid addiction. For more information on those efforts, visit walberg.house.gov/heroin.

After learning of Grubb's passing, Manchin said he promised her father her death would not be in vain. A year after her death, he said, he's reintroducing Jessie's Law to make good on that promise and to do all that he can to prevent parents around the country from experiencing the grief that Grubb's parents feel.

"It's devastating knowing that her death was 100 percent preventable and she should still be with us today," he said in a statement. "We must ensure physicians and other medical professionals have full knowledge of a patient's previous opioid addiction when determining appropriate medical care. We will not give up until Jessie's Law is passed into law so her legacy stands long after us."

About 260 Washtenaw County residents have died from opioid overdoses in the last six years, according to statistics tracked by the county. Preliminary data for 2016 showed 59 overdose deaths last year, the second highest level of the last six years.

This article originally appeared in the March 18 edition of the Ann Arbor News.

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Walberg, Paul Introduce Bipartisan Legislation to Curb Civil Asset Forfeiture Abuse

2017/03/16

Washington, D.C. – U.S Representative Tim Walberg (MI-07) and U.S. Senator Rand Paul have reintroduced the Fifth Amendment Integrity Restoration Act (FAIR Act), bipartisan legislation to curb civil asset forfeiture abuse and protect the American people’s due process and private property rights. H.R. 1555 will raise the level of proof necessary for the government to seize property, reform the IRS structuring statute to protect innocent business owners, increase transparency and Congressional oversight, and many other important reforms.

“Over the past few years, we’ve seen a wave of stories where the government unjustly seized property from innocent Americans without charging them with a crime,” said Rep. Walberg. “These types of abuses of civil asset forfeiture laws should be a clarion call to reform the system and uphold the constitutional rights of the American people. That’s why I’m committed to championing the FAIR Act, which includes comprehensive and bipartisan reforms to limit the scope of the government’s forfeiture powers and protect individual rights.”

“The federal government has made it far too easy for government agencies to take and profit from the property of those who have not been convicted of a crime,” said Dr. Paul. “The FAIR Act will protect Americans’ Fifth Amendment rights from being infringed upon by ensuring that government agencies no longer profit from taking the property of U.S. citizens without due process. It guards against abuse while maintaining the ability of courts to order the surrender of proceeds of crime.”  

“Every year the government takes in billions of dollars in property from those suspected of being criminals – and every year, much of that property turns out to belong to innocent people who have little recourse once their belongings have been seized. This bill would help reform asset forfeiture practices and ensure that every American receives their 4th amendment right to due process. I’m proud to cosponsor it,” said Rep. Keith Ellison.

Rep. Walberg first introduced legislative reforms in July 2014 in direct response to a series of incidents involving innocent property owners having their property seized by federal officials, including a longtime grocer in Michigan, Terry Dehko. In January 2015, he joined with Dr. Paul to introduce the Fifth Amendment Integrity Restoration Act.

Bipartisan original co-sponsors of the FAIR Act in the House include Reps. Tony Cardenas (D-CA), Keith Ellison (D-MN), and Tom McClintock (R-CA). The FAIR Act is supported by a diverse group of organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union, Americans for Tax Reform, FreedomWorks, Heritage Action, Institute for Justice, National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and National Federation of Independent Business.

Click here for the text of H.R. 1555 and S. 642.

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Walberg, Dingell Introduce “Jessie’s Law” to Bolster Fight Against Opioid Epidemic and Assist Recovering Addicts

2017/03/15

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Representatives Tim Walberg (MI-07) and Debbie Dingell (MI-12) today reintroduced “Jessie’s Law,” a bipartisan bill named after Michigan resident Jessie Grubb who tragically died of an opioid overdose last year. Jessie’s Law would help ensure doctors have access to a consenting patient’s prior history of addiction in order to make fully informed care and treatment decisions. Providing this information would help prevent cases like Jessie’s, where a recovering addict in Ann Arbor was unknowingly prescribed and discharged with a powerful opioid that led to her death. Jessie’s Law was introduced last week in the U.S. Senate by Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) with the help of Jessie’s parents from West Virginia, David and Kate Grubb.

“In communities across Michigan and the United States, too many of our friends, neighbors, and family members are struggling with drug addiction,” said Congressman Walberg. “Jessie’s story is a heartbreaking example of needlessly losing a loved one to this battle. It is vital for medical professionals to have access to the information that they need about their patient’s history so they can provide safe treatment and proper care. This bipartisan bill will make a real difference in fighting back against the deadly opioid epidemic and help save lives in our communities.”

“As one who has witnessed firsthand all spectrums of this issue, I believe this bill is one of the most important steps we can take in developing effective strategies to protect families and save lives,” said Congresswoman Dingell. “My father suffered from opioid addiction much of his life and we lost my sister to a drug overdose twelve years ago next week. I know the horrible pain of living with family members with addiction and the constant ache of losing someone you love. We have a responsibility to confront this epidemic for families like Jessie’s, and it is important that in our discussions to seek solutions, educate and prevent abuse that we ensure we do not stigmatize those with real and legitimate needs. I live with a man whose constant companion is debilitating pain and who at certain times can barely walk. This proposed bill does exactly that. Jessie’s Law provides information to medical professionals so they have an accurate picture of their patient’s history and can treat them safely and effectively.”

“After learning of Jessie’s passing, I promised her father that her death would not be in vain,” Senator Manchin said. “Now a year later after her death, I am re-introducing “Jessie’s Law” to make good on that promise and to do all that I can to prevent parents around our country from experiencing the grief that Jessie’s parents feel. It’s devastating knowing that her death was 100 percent preventable and she should still be with us today. We must ensure physicians and other medical professionals have full knowledge of a patient’s previous opioid addiction when determining appropriate medical care. We will not give up until Jessie’s Law is passed into law so her legacy stands long after us.”

Living in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Jessie Grubb was in recovery and getting her life back on track after seven years of struggling with addiction. Due to a hip injury while training for a marathon, Jessie underwent surgery in February 2016. Jessie’s parents informed hospital personnel that she was a recovering addict, but that message never made it to the doctor who discharged her. Jessie left with a prescription for 50 oxycodone pills and fatally overdosed that same night.

A member of the Bipartisan Task Force to Combat the Heroin Epidemic, Congressman Walberg continues to collaborate with stakeholders at the local, state, and federal level to raise awareness and develop best practices to fight heroin and opioid addiction. For more information on Walberg’s work on this issue, visit walberg.house.gov/heroin. Read More

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WLNS: Jackson County teen raises awareness for muscular dystrophy

2017-04-06 13:01:22


Walberg Works to Protect Affordable Health Care Options

2017-04-06 00:06:17


Walberg Welcomes Dream Foundation Recipient from Jackson County to DC

2017-04-05 17:42:18


Walberg: Preserve the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

2017-03-28 18:49:45


Walberg Fights to Lower Health Care Costs for Workers, Small Businesses

2017-03-22 19:19:11


Fentanyl: The Next Wave of the Opioid Crisis

2017-03-21 17:44:19


Walberg Champions Small Business Health Fairness Act

2017-03-21 16:36:51


Walberg Works to Protect Missing and Exploited Children

2017-03-16 21:28:20


Walberg Works to Expand Coverage, Lower Costs for Small Businesses

2017-03-08 19:38:43


WLNS: Walberg tours Jackson Recovery Resource Center

2017-03-08 01:24:07


Walberg Champions Bipartisan Good Government Transparency Bill

2017-03-02 16:00:53


Walberg Discusses Small Business Health Fairness Act

2017-03-01 18:39:52


Walberg Examines International Anti-Doping System With All-Star Panel

2017-03-01 18:36:25


WILX: Walberg Invites Jackson Drug Counselor to President's Joint Address

2017-03-01 00:45:22


Walberg Backs Bill to Protect Patients with Pre-Existing Conditions

2017-02-24 18:07:32


Walberg Takes Action to Protect Retirement Security

2017-02-20 17:53:52


Walberg: We're Delivering Relief from Obamacare, Better Health Care Solutions

2017-02-16 22:23:59


WILX: Walberg, Kildee introduce bill to help families save for education

2017-02-15 16:56:33


Walberg Discusses Ways to Close Skills Gap, Strengthen Workforce

2017-02-08 00:59:34


Walberg: Roll Back Misguided Blacklisting Rule

2017-02-02 20:35:52


Contact Information

2436 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-6276
Fax 202-225-6281
walberg.house.gov

Tim Walberg is currently serving his third term in Congress as the representative of south-central Michigan.  The diverse constituency of Michigan’s 7th District encompasses Branch, Eaton, Hillsdale, Jackson, Lenawee, and Monroe Counties, along with parts of Washtenaw County.  Since first taking office, Tim has hosted hundreds of coffee and town hall meetings to better understand the thoughts and concerns of the district.

Prior to his time in public office, Tim served as a pastor in Michigan and Indiana, as president of the Warren Reuther Center for Education and Community Impact, and as a division manager for Moody Bible Institute.  He also served in the Michigan House of Representatives from 1983 to 1999, and is proud to bring his reputation as a principled legislator, fiscal reformer, and defender of traditional values to Washington.

In the 113th Congress, Tim serves on the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chair of the Workforce Protections Subcommittee.  In addition, he serves on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

He and his wife, Sue, have been married for over 39 years, and enjoy spending time outdoors and riding on their Harley. They live in Tipton, Michigan, where they raised their three children: Matthew, Heidi and Caleb.


Serving With

Jack Bergman

MICHIGAN's 1st DISTRICT

Bill Huizenga

MICHIGAN's 2nd DISTRICT

Justin Amash

MICHIGAN's 3rd DISTRICT

John Moolenaar

MICHIGAN's 4th DISTRICT

Fred Upton

MICHIGAN's 6th DISTRICT

Mike Bishop

MICHIGAN's 8th DISTRICT

Paul Mitchell

MICHIGAN's 10th DISTRICT

Dave Trott

MICHIGAN's 11th DISTRICT

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