Tim Walberg

Tim Walberg

MICHIGAN's 7th DISTRICT

House Passes Walberg's Small Business Health Fairness Act

2017/03/22

Washington, D.C. – The House of Representatives today passed the Small Business Health Fairness Act (H.R. 1101), legislation that would expand health care coverage and lower costs for working families. Introduced by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI), chairman of the Education and the Workforce Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions, and Rep. Sam Johnson (R-TX), chairman of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Social Security, the legislation empowers small businesses to band together though association health plans (AHPs) and negotiate for lower health insurance costs on behalf of their employees. Click here to watch Rep. Walberg's remarks on the House floor.

“Providing more health care options for small businesses is essential to expanding affordable coverage for America’s workers,” Rep. Walberg said. “When it comes to accessing high-quality health care coverage, small businesses should not be treated any differently than large corporations and unions. This bill will level the playing field for small businesses, and it’s one step toward achieving a competitive health care marketplace that stretches across state lines. These are exactly the types of positive reforms that we’ve promised — reforms that will deliver more choices and lower health care costs for working families. I’d like to thank my colleague Representative Johnson for championing this important legislation for years, and I look forward to continuing our efforts to provide the American people a better way on health care.”

“As someone who owned and ran a small business between my time in the Air Force and serving in Congress, I understand the challenges other small business owners face,” Rep. Johnson said. “For years, I’ve fought for AHPs to level the playing field so that these job creators can offer their employees more health care options at better costs.  When Obamacare hit and small businesses suffered, AHPs became even more important.  In fact, this bill is a central part of the effort to replace this bad law with commonsense solutions that help American families.  I thank Chairman Walberg for his strong support of this effort, and I look forward to seeing our bill signed into law.  Better access to affordable health care is something all Americans want, need, and deserve.”  

“The House has taken an important step forward in our efforts to replace Obamacare with positive solutions that put working families first,” Education and the Workforce Committee Chairwoman Virginia Foxx (R-NC) said. "These commonsense reforms will empower small businesses to purchase high-quality health care coverage at a lower cost for their employees — including across state lines. This is a win for the hardworking Americans who are struggling with soaring costs and deserve more affordable health care options. An important part of our three-phase plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, this vote reflects our commitment to delivering free-market, patient-centered reforms. I’d like to thank my colleagues Representative Johnson and Representative Walberg for leading this effort on behalf of our nation’s workers and small businesses.”

BACKGROUND: Due to their size and economies of scale, large businesses and labor organizations have the ability to negotiate on behalf of employees for high-quality health care at more affordable costs. By offering a qualified group health plan under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), these large employers and labor organizations are also exempt from myriad state rules and regulations on health insurance.

Small businesses, however, do not have the same bargaining power as larger businesses. Small businesses are also unable to band together to increase their bargaining power in the health insurance marketplace. By allowing small businesses to join together through association health plans (AHPs), small businesses can have greater ability to negotiate for lower health care costs for their employees. 

Part of a broader effort to replace Obamacare with patient-centered solutions, Chairmen Walberg and Johnson introduced the Small Business Health Fairness Act. The legislation would empower small businesses to join together through AHPs to offer health insurance for their employees at a lower cost. Through these reforms, H.R. 1101 will:

  • Increase small businesses’ bargaining power with insurance providers and put them on a more level playing field with larger companies and unions.
  • Expand affordable coverage for working families who want to purchase health insurance through their employer.
  • Lower administrative costs for small businesses that face limited resources and want to provide health insurance to their employees.
  • Provide important protections to ensure plans are sustainable and individuals can count on their health care coverage when they need it.
  • Allow small businesses in different states to join together through a group health plan — a step toward purchasing insurance across state lines.

To read the bill, click here.  

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Wall Street Journal: Save Small Business from Obamacare

2017/03/21

By Reps. Sam Johnson (R-TX) and Tim Walberg (R-MI)

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini warned last month that the Affordable Care Act is in a “death spiral.” Because ObamaCare is failing, we are debating how best to repeal and replace it. But amid this debate, it’s important to remember the people ObamaCare is hurting.

Here is what Kathy, who owns a company in Missouri, told the House Ways and Means Committee: “As a small business owner, I recall the days before the ACA when we would receive a 2-inch notebook that contained multiple quotes from different health insurance companies. Now, our options are listed on a single legal sized sheet of paper. We only received three quotes for 2017, and just two of them were adequate for our region. In 2013, our insurance cost $180,000 for 92 lives with a $2,000 deductible. In 2016, we paid $252,000 for just 61 lives who face a $5,000 deductible.”

Her story, unfortunately, is not unique. Under ObamaCare’s costly regulations, many business owners must make hard choices between cutting back employees’ hours, laying off staff, or dropping health-care coverage (and then paying a penalty for doing so if the firm has more than 50 workers). Among businesses with fewer than 10 employees, 35.6% offered health insurance in 2008. That figure had fallen by 2015 to 22.7%, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

Even worse, a January report from the American Action Forum found that since ObamaCare became law, “among small businesses, the rise in premiums has been associated with $19 billion in lost wages, 10,130 fewer business establishments, and nearly 300,000 lost jobs.” That’s a big problem for American families, particularly since small businesses are responsible for 55% of all jobs and 66% of all net new jobs.

Repealing ObamaCare is necessary and would certainly help small businesses grow and hire new workers. But Congress should also help these job-creators provide affordable health-care options to their employees. That’s why we introduced the Small Business Health Fairness Act, which the House is scheduled to vote on this week.

The legislation is built on a basic rule of insurance: The bigger the risk pool, the lower the premium. That’s why large corporations and unions have an advantage in providing health insurance to their employees and members. Our bill would allow small businesses to band together through association health plans, or AHPs, to provide good policies for workers and their families at a lower cost.

AHPs could function in one of two ways: They could work directly with an insurer to negotiate better rates. Or they could self-fund, just as many large corporations and unions already do. Self-funded plans would also be exempted from many costly state and federal requirements, just as many corporate and union plans are.

To ensure the success and fairness of AHPs, our bill includes requirements that would provide accountability, stability, and consistency across the country. Any active marketing by an AHP sponsor would have to be directed at all its members, regardless of their claims history or health status. AHPs would be restricted from setting premiums in a way that might raise costs for higher-claims companies compared with similarly situated employers in the plan.

As House Republicans work to repeal ObamaCare and alleviate the burden it places on Americans across the country, we hope that AHPs can be a central part of the effort. Passing our bill is a common-sense way to give small-businesses the same economies of scale in health insurance that Fortune 500 companies enjoy—with the result being more affordable coverage for workers and their families.

This op-ed originally appeared in the March 21 edition of the Wall Street Journal. Read More

Ann Arbor News: 'Jessie's Law' named after Ann Arbor woman who died of opioid overdose

2017/03/18

ANN ARBOR, MI - U.S. Reps. Tim Walberg and Debbie Dingell, along with other members of Congress, have reintroduced "Jessie's Law," a bipartisan bill named after Ann Arbor resident Jessie Grubb, who died of an opioid overdose.

Jessie's Law would help ensure doctors have access to a consenting patient's prior history of addiction in order to make fully informed care and treatment decisions. Providing that information, the lawmakers argue, would help prevent tragic incidents like what happened to Grubb, a recovering addict who was prescribed a powerful opioid that led to her death last March.

The 30-year-old from West Virginia was here recovering from a seven-year heroin addiction and was said to be clean and getting her life back on track when she underwent hip surgery at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in February 2016.

She previously had been in treatment at Dawn Farm, a local addiction treatment and recovery center. After leaving Dawn Farm, she remained in Ann Arbor, a city she grew to love.

According to the lawmakers sponsoring Jessie's Law, her parents informed hospital personnel she was a recovering addict, but that message never made it to the doctor who discharged her. She left with a prescription for 50 oxycodone pills and fatally overdosed by the next day.

Authorities believe Grubb crushed up the oxycodone pills, mixed them with liquid and injected them into an IV port, causing a fatal overdose.

"In communities across Michigan and the United States, too many of our friends, neighbors and family members are struggling with drug addiction," Walberg, R-Tipton, said in a statement.

"Jessie's story is a heartbreaking example of needlessly losing a loved one to this battle. It is vital for medical professionals to have access to the information that they need about their patient's history so they can provide safe treatment and proper care. This bipartisan bill will make a real difference in fighting back against the deadly opioid epidemic and help save lives in our communities."

Jessie's Law also was reintroduced last week in the U.S. Senate by Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore, two senators from West Virginia, with the help of Jessie's parents from West Virginia, David and Kate Grubb.

The lawmakers from West Virginia, along with Dingell and Walberg, also tried introducing Jessie's Law last April, but it didn't make it out of Congress.

"As one who has witnessed firsthand all spectrums of this issue, I believe this bill is one of the most important steps we can take in developing effective strategies to protect families and save lives," Dingell, D-Dearborn, said in a statement.

Dingell said her father suffered from opioid addiction much of his life and she lost her sister to a drug overdose 12 years ago.

"I know the horrible pain of living with family members with addiction and the constant ache of losing someone you love," she said.

"We have a responsibility to confront this epidemic for families like Jessie's, and it is important that in our discussions to seek solutions, educate and prevent abuse that we ensure we do not stigmatize those with real and legitimate needs."

A member of the Bipartisan Task Force to Combat the Heroin Epidemic, Walberg continues to collaborate with stakeholders at the local, state, and federal level to raise awareness and develop best practices to fight heroin and opioid addiction. For more information on those efforts, visit walberg.house.gov/heroin.

After learning of Grubb's passing, Manchin said he promised her father her death would not be in vain. A year after her death, he said, he's reintroducing Jessie's Law to make good on that promise and to do all that he can to prevent parents around the country from experiencing the grief that Grubb's parents feel.

"It's devastating knowing that her death was 100 percent preventable and she should still be with us today," he said in a statement. "We must ensure physicians and other medical professionals have full knowledge of a patient's previous opioid addiction when determining appropriate medical care. We will not give up until Jessie's Law is passed into law so her legacy stands long after us."

About 260 Washtenaw County residents have died from opioid overdoses in the last six years, according to statistics tracked by the county. Preliminary data for 2016 showed 59 overdose deaths last year, the second highest level of the last six years.

This article originally appeared in the March 18 edition of the Ann Arbor News.

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Walberg, Paul Introduce Bipartisan Legislation to Curb Civil Asset Forfeiture Abuse

2017/03/16

Washington, D.C. – U.S Representative Tim Walberg (MI-07) and U.S. Senator Rand Paul have reintroduced the Fifth Amendment Integrity Restoration Act (FAIR Act), bipartisan legislation to curb civil asset forfeiture abuse and protect the American people’s due process and private property rights. H.R. 1555 will raise the level of proof necessary for the government to seize property, reform the IRS structuring statute to protect innocent business owners, increase transparency and Congressional oversight, and many other important reforms.

“Over the past few years, we’ve seen a wave of stories where the government unjustly seized property from innocent Americans without charging them with a crime,” said Rep. Walberg. “These types of abuses of civil asset forfeiture laws should be a clarion call to reform the system and uphold the constitutional rights of the American people. That’s why I’m committed to championing the FAIR Act, which includes comprehensive and bipartisan reforms to limit the scope of the government’s forfeiture powers and protect individual rights.”

“The federal government has made it far too easy for government agencies to take and profit from the property of those who have not been convicted of a crime,” said Dr. Paul. “The FAIR Act will protect Americans’ Fifth Amendment rights from being infringed upon by ensuring that government agencies no longer profit from taking the property of U.S. citizens without due process. It guards against abuse while maintaining the ability of courts to order the surrender of proceeds of crime.”  

“Every year the government takes in billions of dollars in property from those suspected of being criminals – and every year, much of that property turns out to belong to innocent people who have little recourse once their belongings have been seized. This bill would help reform asset forfeiture practices and ensure that every American receives their 4th amendment right to due process. I’m proud to cosponsor it,” said Rep. Keith Ellison.

Rep. Walberg first introduced legislative reforms in July 2014 in direct response to a series of incidents involving innocent property owners having their property seized by federal officials, including a longtime grocer in Michigan, Terry Dehko. In January 2015, he joined with Dr. Paul to introduce the Fifth Amendment Integrity Restoration Act.

Bipartisan original co-sponsors of the FAIR Act in the House include Reps. Tony Cardenas (D-CA), Keith Ellison (D-MN), and Tom McClintock (R-CA). The FAIR Act is supported by a diverse group of organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union, Americans for Tax Reform, FreedomWorks, Heritage Action, Institute for Justice, National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and National Federation of Independent Business.

Click here for the text of H.R. 1555 and S. 642.

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Walberg, Dingell Introduce “Jessie’s Law” to Bolster Fight Against Opioid Epidemic and Assist Recovering Addicts

2017/03/15

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Representatives Tim Walberg (MI-07) and Debbie Dingell (MI-12) today reintroduced “Jessie’s Law,” a bipartisan bill named after Michigan resident Jessie Grubb who tragically died of an opioid overdose last year. Jessie’s Law would help ensure doctors have access to a consenting patient’s prior history of addiction in order to make fully informed care and treatment decisions. Providing this information would help prevent cases like Jessie’s, where a recovering addict in Ann Arbor was unknowingly prescribed and discharged with a powerful opioid that led to her death. Jessie’s Law was introduced last week in the U.S. Senate by Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) with the help of Jessie’s parents from West Virginia, David and Kate Grubb.

“In communities across Michigan and the United States, too many of our friends, neighbors, and family members are struggling with drug addiction,” said Congressman Walberg. “Jessie’s story is a heartbreaking example of needlessly losing a loved one to this battle. It is vital for medical professionals to have access to the information that they need about their patient’s history so they can provide safe treatment and proper care. This bipartisan bill will make a real difference in fighting back against the deadly opioid epidemic and help save lives in our communities.”

“As one who has witnessed firsthand all spectrums of this issue, I believe this bill is one of the most important steps we can take in developing effective strategies to protect families and save lives,” said Congresswoman Dingell. “My father suffered from opioid addiction much of his life and we lost my sister to a drug overdose twelve years ago next week. I know the horrible pain of living with family members with addiction and the constant ache of losing someone you love. We have a responsibility to confront this epidemic for families like Jessie’s, and it is important that in our discussions to seek solutions, educate and prevent abuse that we ensure we do not stigmatize those with real and legitimate needs. I live with a man whose constant companion is debilitating pain and who at certain times can barely walk. This proposed bill does exactly that. Jessie’s Law provides information to medical professionals so they have an accurate picture of their patient’s history and can treat them safely and effectively.”

“After learning of Jessie’s passing, I promised her father that her death would not be in vain,” Senator Manchin said. “Now a year later after her death, I am re-introducing “Jessie’s Law” to make good on that promise and to do all that I can to prevent parents around our country from experiencing the grief that Jessie’s parents feel. It’s devastating knowing that her death was 100 percent preventable and she should still be with us today. We must ensure physicians and other medical professionals have full knowledge of a patient’s previous opioid addiction when determining appropriate medical care. We will not give up until Jessie’s Law is passed into law so her legacy stands long after us.”

Living in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Jessie Grubb was in recovery and getting her life back on track after seven years of struggling with addiction. Due to a hip injury while training for a marathon, Jessie underwent surgery in February 2016. Jessie’s parents informed hospital personnel that she was a recovering addict, but that message never made it to the doctor who discharged her. Jessie left with a prescription for 50 oxycodone pills and fatally overdosed that same night.

A member of the Bipartisan Task Force to Combat the Heroin Epidemic, Congressman Walberg continues to collaborate with stakeholders at the local, state, and federal level to raise awareness and develop best practices to fight heroin and opioid addiction. For more information on Walberg’s work on this issue, visit walberg.house.gov/heroin. Read More

WLNS: On opioid addiction epidemic: “This is a very complex problem”

2017/03/07


In order to improve a community’s future, you sometimes have to look at its past.

In 2016, Jackson County saw a troubling trend when it comes to heroin addiction. It’s a trend that continues to get worse.

The community is looking for ways to combat the problem and keep the conversation going Congressman Tim Walberg spent the day in Jackson County on Monday where he met with law enforcement toured the county jail and got some insight into the drug epidemic from the recovery resource center in the county.

The city of Jackson has seen it’s fair share of addiction starting with prescription drugs, to heroin.

Last year in just a six day span, Jackson Police responded to eight separate heroin overdoses.

But it’s not just exclusive to Jackson; this issue is affecting the entire country the saying goes it takes a village and in this case, help is needed from all stakeholders in the community from lawmakers to law enforcement.

“This is something that transcends religious, racial, gender, political, community societal boundaries,” Rep. Tim Walberg, R-7th District said.

Congressman Tim Walberg is no stranger to the fight against opioid abuse, especially in Jackson County and today he and Mike Hirst who is the founder of a non-profit organization Andy’s Angel’s got a face to face look at the growing epidemic to expand their efforts in combating it.

Hirst lost his son to a heroin overdose in 2010. Andy’s Angels was formed in his sons memory. It works to educate the community about opioid and heroin abuse.

“This is a very complex problem,” Hirst said. “Nobody has the answer to it so we gotta come at it from every single angle we can think of his is not a political issue, this is not a race issue, this is a human issue.”

Much of their day was spent touring the county talking to inmates in the jail and spending time with police.

The conversation continued at Home of New Vision, a recovery resource center.

“More is being done. I think that more can be done,” Shannon Jackson said. She’s the Jackson Program Manager at Home of New Vision.

I would say the biggest challenge in our community is resources for treatment as well as long term treatment,” Jackson said.

Last year the center referred just under 500 people for treatment. Of those people, more than 150 of them reported opiates as their drug of choice.

As of March 3, 2017 the center has referred just under 90 people for treatment with more than 30 reporting opiates for drug of choice.

“Law enforcement is trying to shoulder their share of the burden here but this is not a problem we’ll be able to arrest our way out of it,” Jackson County Sheriff Steve Rand said. “This is going to take a multi-faceted approach it’s going to take the people like here at the recovery center, it’s going to take people like Mike Hirst, people like Congressman Walberg.”

Sheriff Rand said it’s important for people to remember that most times, addiction doesn’t just start with someone going right out on the street first thing and take heroin.

“This often started with an oxycodone or a hydrocodone,” he said. “I think everybody has an opportunity here to do something about the issue and again it’s not a law enforcement problem. It’s a community problem we all need work together to fix.”

There are a number of local resources available for those who are looking to get help. If you or someone you know is in need, check out the Seen on 6 section of our website.

Click here to watch the original story on WLNS.com. Read More

Walberg Statement on GM Delta Township Plant Announcement

2017/03/06

Jackson, Mich. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) released the following statement after General Motors announced it will be eliminating the third shift at its Delta Township Plant. 
 
“I am disappointed by today's news that the GM Delta Township Plant will be eliminating its third shift. This is a very difficult day for many of the workers and their families. I have visited the GM Delta Township Plant on numerous occasions, and the dedicated and hardworking men and women who work there represent the best of what Michigan has to offer. The auto industry is critical to our state's economy, and I will continue fighting for more jobs and opportunity for the workers who form the backbone of Michigan manufacturing.”
 
Congressman Walberg serves on the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chairman of the Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions. For more information on Walberg’s work in Congress visit walberg.house.gov.
 
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Jackson Cit Pat: U.S. Rep. visits jail, recovery center for first-hand look at addiction

2017/03/06

JACKSON, MI - Searching for more insight on Jackson County's growing opioid epidemic, U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg, R-Tipton, toured the county Monday to see what he can do to help.

Walberg, alongside Andy's Angels founder Mike Hirst, toured the Jackson County Jail on Chanter Road Monday, March 6, meeting with inmates who have been affected by heroin.

"Talking with the inmates here, it's clear this will be a battle to get people the help they need," said Walberg, who represents Michigan's 7th District. "The first step to winning is to be aware of how prevalent opioid abuse is. It effects people from all walks of life and it's easy to feel alone if you're addicted."

Hirst, who has been working with Walberg on issues related to a growing heroin epidemic, recently attended President Donald Trump's address to Congress as Walberg's guest.

"When I walked out of there, I felt positive about the direction of this country," said Hirst, a Jackson business owner involved education, prevention and support related to opioid abuse since the 2010 death of his son, Andy.

After touring the jail, Walberg went on a ride-along with Deputy Sam Sukovich through the county and then was taken to the Jackson Recovery Resource Center, 407 W. Michigan Ave., to see how people can seek help and recover from addiction.

In 2016, the center referred 486 people for treatment with 152 reporting opioids, more than any other substance, as their drug of choice, according to data collected by the center.

As of March 3, the center has referred 86 people for treatment in 2017.

"We want people to not feel alone or embarrassed if they are addicted," Walberg said. "We need people to step in, to get help and to see they have potential to do great things."

Andy's Angels is a non-profit foundation that educates the community on opioid and heroin abuse and provides support for families and individuals suffering from addiction. Hirst started the organization memory of his son, Andy, who died of a heroin overdose in 2010 at age 24.

This article originally appeared in the March 6 edition of the Jackson Citizen Patriot. Read More

Walberg’s Bipartisan Good Government Transparency Bill Passes the House

2017/03/02

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg’s (MI-07) bipartisan legislation to provide greater transparency and help restore the integrity of the federal government’s rulemaking process passed the House of Representatives today. H.R. 1004, the Regulatory Integrity Act, requires federal agencies to post, in a central location, all communications they issue during the proposed rule stage so that the public can fully participate and trust that the rulemaking process is neutral and unbiased. It is Congressman Walberg’s third bill to pass the House in the first months of the 115th Congress. Click here to watch his remarks on the House floor.

“The public comment period is a critical component of the rulemaking process, yet too often we’ve seen federal agencies treat it as a perfunctory step,” said Walberg. “The American people need to have confidence that federal agencies, regardless of whether it is a Republican or Democratic administration, are open to their insights and constructive criticism. This bipartisan bill will help restore the integrity of our regulatory process by ensuring agencies are honestly asking for feedback from the public, not advocating for a predetermined outcome.”
 
The Regulatory Integrity Act would increase transparency to help prevent future instances of misconduct like what occurred during the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) covert campaign efforts during the public rulemaking process for the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule. In 2015, the New York Times reported that the EPA undertook “a campaign that tests the limits of federal lobbying law.” The nonpartisan Government Accountability Office concluded the EPA overstepped and issued a report that said the agency undertook “covert propaganda” and “grassroots lobbying” during the process.

Congressman Walberg serves on the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chairman of the Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions. For more information on Walberg’s work in Congress visit walberg.house.gov. Read More

The Hill: House votes to create new requirements for writing regulations

2017/03/02

The House on Thursday passed legislation aimed at increasing transparency in the regulatory process.

The Regulatory Integrity Act, backed by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-Mich.), requires federal agencies to shed light on what happens behind the scenes when they are crafting new rules. The measure also prohibits regulators from drumming up public support for those rules.

The House voted 246-176 to pass the bill, with 14 Democrats crossing party lines to support the measure, and one Republican opposing it.

“The public comment period is an essential part of upholding our Democratic values, because it ensures that Americans will have their voices heard in the federal government’s regulatory process,” Walberg said Thursday on the floor. “Agencies must take the comment period seriously.”

Under the Regulatory Integrity Act, federal agencies would be required to publish online a list of regulations they are writing, a description of those rules, the status, and timeframe for when the agency started working on and expects to complete each rule.

Republicans say those requirements will force federal agencies to be more transparent.

The legislation also prohibits federal agencies from advocating for their regulations and “appealing to the public” to support these proposed rules.

Instead, the bill directs regulators to rely on public feedback to shape their rules.

To ensure this happens, federal agencies would be required to publish a list of their “public communications” about regulations, the type of communication, date, audience and a copy of what was said.

Federal agencies must “keep to the facts” and “speak about regulations in a neutral, unbiased tone,” Walberg said.

“People need confidence that federal agencies — regardless of whether it is a Republican or Democratic administration — are open to their insights and constructive criticism,” he said.

But Democrats raised concerns that this provision would violate the First Amendment, which protects freedom of speech, because it prohibits agencies from promoting their regulations.

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas) suggested the rule would “uncertainty and confusion” within federal agencies “as to what public communications are permissible, and risks discouraging agencies from keeping the public apprised of the important work they do on its behalf.”

The Regulatory Integrity Act passed the House, but Senate Democrats could block the measure before it gets to President Trump.

This article originally appeared in the March 2 edition of The Hill. Read More

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Walberg Fights to Lower Health Care Costs for Workers, Small Businesses

2017-03-22 19:19:11


Fentanyl: The Next Wave of the Opioid Crisis

2017-03-21 17:44:19


Walberg Champions Small Business Health Fairness Act

2017-03-21 16:36:51


Walberg Works to Protect Missing and Exploited Children

2017-03-16 21:28:20


Walberg Works to Expand Coverage, Lower Costs for Small Businesses

2017-03-08 19:38:43


WLNS: Walberg tours Jackson Recovery Resource Center

2017-03-08 01:24:07


Walberg Champions Bipartisan Good Government Transparency Bill

2017-03-02 16:00:53


Walberg Discusses Small Business Health Fairness Act

2017-03-01 18:39:52


Walberg Examines International Anti-Doping System With All-Star Panel

2017-03-01 18:36:25


WILX: Walberg Invites Jackson Drug Counselor to President's Joint Address

2017-03-01 00:45:22


Walberg Backs Bill to Protect Patients with Pre-Existing Conditions

2017-02-24 18:07:32


Walberg Takes Action to Protect Retirement Security

2017-02-20 17:53:52


Walberg: We're Delivering Relief from Obamacare, Better Health Care Solutions

2017-02-16 22:23:59


WILX: Walberg, Kildee introduce bill to help families save for education

2017-02-15 16:56:33


Walberg Discusses Ways to Close Skills Gap, Strengthen Workforce

2017-02-08 00:59:34


Walberg: Roll Back Misguided Blacklisting Rule

2017-02-02 20:35:52


Walberg Highlights New Auto Industry Jobs, Innovation

2017-02-02 18:27:22


Walberg Urges Senate to Confirm Betsy DeVos for Education Secretary

2017-01-13 14:18:45


Walberg Highlights 2017 Auto Show on House Floor

2017-01-10 17:46:21


House Passes Walberg Transparency Bill to Begin New Congress

2017-01-04 18:06:25


Contact Information

2436 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-6276
Fax 202-225-6281
walberg.house.gov

Tim Walberg is currently serving his third term in Congress as the representative of south-central Michigan.  The diverse constituency of Michigan’s 7th District encompasses Branch, Eaton, Hillsdale, Jackson, Lenawee, and Monroe Counties, along with parts of Washtenaw County.  Since first taking office, Tim has hosted hundreds of coffee and town hall meetings to better understand the thoughts and concerns of the district.

Prior to his time in public office, Tim served as a pastor in Michigan and Indiana, as president of the Warren Reuther Center for Education and Community Impact, and as a division manager for Moody Bible Institute.  He also served in the Michigan House of Representatives from 1983 to 1999, and is proud to bring his reputation as a principled legislator, fiscal reformer, and defender of traditional values to Washington.

In the 113th Congress, Tim serves on the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chair of the Workforce Protections Subcommittee.  In addition, he serves on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

He and his wife, Sue, have been married for over 39 years, and enjoy spending time outdoors and riding on their Harley. They live in Tipton, Michigan, where they raised their three children: Matthew, Heidi and Caleb.


Serving With

Jack Bergman

MICHIGAN's 1st DISTRICT

Bill Huizenga

MICHIGAN's 2nd DISTRICT

Justin Amash

MICHIGAN's 3rd DISTRICT

John Moolenaar

MICHIGAN's 4th DISTRICT

Fred Upton

MICHIGAN's 6th DISTRICT

Mike Bishop

MICHIGAN's 8th DISTRICT

Paul Mitchell

MICHIGAN's 10th DISTRICT

Dave Trott

MICHIGAN's 11th DISTRICT

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