Tim Walberg

Tim Walberg

MICHIGAN's 7th DISTRICT

Walberg Introduces Bipartisan ‘Jessie’s Law’ to Combat Opioid Epidemic

2016/04/29

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) today introduced “Jessie’s Law,” a bipartisan bill named after Michigan resident Jessie Grubb who tragically died earlier this year of an opioid overdose. Jessie’s Law would help ensure doctors have access to a consenting patient’s prior history of addiction in order to make fully informed care and treatment decisions. Providing this information would help prevent cases like Jessie’s, where a recovering addict in Ann Arbor was unknowingly prescribed and discharged with a powerful opioid that led to her death.

“As a father of three, I cannot fathom the immense pain of losing a child and my heartfelt condolences are with the Grubb family. Too many families in Michigan and across America have seen lives swept up by addiction and we must act now to reverse this tragic trend. With Jessie’s Law, we are taking another important, bipartisan, step to confront this epidemic and help save lives in our communities,” said Congressman Tim Walberg.

“As one who has witnessed firsthand all spectrums of this issue, I believe this bill is one of the most important steps we can take in developing effective strategies to address this issue and save lives,” said Congresswoman Debbie Dingell. “My father suffered from opioid addiction much of his life and my sister died from a drug overdose. I know the horrible pain of living with a family member with addiction and the sadness you never get over of losing a loved one to the terrible scourge of addiction. In all of our discussions in seeking solutions, we must educate and prevent abuse but at the same time not stigmatize those with real and legitimate needs. Jessie’s Law does exactly that. It provides information to the treating physician and other medical professionals so they have an accurate picture to treat the patient safely and effectively.”

“It is an honor to introduce Jessie’s Law in the U.S. House of Representatives. Jessie Grubb’s story is especially heartbreaking because her death could have been prevented. Simply providing medical professionals with this vital information we can prevent the unnecessary deaths of so many,” said Congressman Alex X. Mooney.

Living in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Jessie Grubb was in recovery and getting her life back on track after seven years of struggling with addiction. Due to a hip injury while training for a marathon, Jessie underwent surgery in late February. Jessie’s parents informed hospital personnel that she was a recovering addict, but that message never made it to the doctor who discharged her. Jessie left with a prescription for 50 oxycodone pills and fatally overdosed that same night.

Original co-sponsors of the bill include: Representatives Debbie Dingell (D-MI), Evan Jenkins (R-WV), Dan Kildee (D-MI), Annie Kuster (D-NH), Brenda Lawrence (D-MI), David McKinley (R-WV), John Moolenaar (R-MI), and Alex X. Mooney (R-WV).

Jessie’s Law was introduced earlier this week in the U.S. Senate by Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) with the help of Jessie’s parents from West Virginia, David and Kate Grubb.

A member of the Bipartisan Task Force to Combat the Heroin Epidemic, Congressman Walberg continues to collaborate with stakeholders at the local, state, and federal level to raise awareness and develop best practices to fight heroin and opioid addiction.

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VIDEO: Walberg Encourages Participation in National Prescription Drug Take Back Day

2016/04/28

Washington, D.C.—Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) today spoke on the House floor to encourage residents of Michigan’s 7th District to participate in the DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, April 30 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM. The service provides an opportunity for citizens to safely and securely dispose of their expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs at an authorized disposal site in their community.

On Saturday, Congressman Walberg will join with the Jackson Police Department at 11:00 AM to raise awareness about the disposal site at 216 E Washington Ave in Jackson, which is open from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM. Additional drop off locations are available in Branch, Eaton, Lenawee, Monroe, and Washtenaw Counties.

Transcript of Congressman Walberg's Remarks
Mr. Speaker, talk to your neighbors, turn on the local news, and you hear the tragic stories of how opioid abuse is devastating families across this country and in my state of Michigan. 

Combating this epidemic requires us to work together to tackle it head on.

No effort is too small, and each of us can do our part.

One way to help is participating in National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, which takes place this Saturday, April 30th.

It’s an opportunity for citizens to clean out their medicine cabinets of unwanted medications with no questions asked.

Safe disposal of expired prescription drugs is an important step to preventing abuse.

Authorized drop off sites are located all across Michigan’s 7th District, and I will be stopping by at one of those sites—the Jackson Police Department on Saturday.

Mr. Speaker, this is not a Republican or Democrat issue. It’s a human issue, and it affects us all.

I yield back.

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Walberg Fights for Stronger Email Privacy Protections

2016/04/27

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) voted today for the Email Privacy Act, bipartisan legislation to strengthen and modernize our nation’s electronic communications laws that were first enacted in 1986. The bill would enhance privacy protections for consumers and require the government to obtain a warrant in order to access online communications stored by a third-party service providers.

“Technology has advanced dramatically since 1986 and our obsolete digital privacy laws need to be updated to reflect the realities of the 21st century. The Email Privacy Act is an essential step to protect Americans’ emails from government intrusion and uphold our individual liberties guaranteed under the Constitution,” said Walberg.

Congressman Walberg serves on the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chair of the Workforce Protections Subcommittee. In addition, he serves on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. For more information on Walberg’s work in Congress visit walberg.house.gov. Read More

Walberg Encourages Participation in National Prescription Drug Take Back Day

2016/04/26

Jackson, MI—Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) today encouraged residents of Michigan’s 7th District to participate in the DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, April 30 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM. The service provides an opportunity for citizens to safely and securely dispose of their expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs at an authorized disposal site in their community.

On Saturday, Congressman Walberg will join with the Jackson Police Department at 11:00 AM to raise awareness about the disposal site at 216 E Washington Ave in Jackson, which is open from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM. Additional drop off locations are available across the 7th District.

“Prescription drug abuse is shattering lives and tearing families apart and we must work together to combat this grow epidemic in our communities,” said Congressman Walberg. “Proper disposal of old and unwanted prescription drugs is one important way we can help keep our children, families, and neighborhoods safe.”

“Even prescription drugs can be harmful if used inappropriately so we support any effort to get them out of people's medicine cabinets and off the streets,” said Jackson Police and Fire Services Director Matt Heins.

National Prescription Drug Take Back Day is free and anonymous—no questions asked. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. The usual methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash—both pose potential safety and health hazards. Last September, Americans turned in 350 tons—over 700,000 pounds—of prescription drugs at more than 5,000 sites across the country.  

Here is a list of collection sites around the 7th District open from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM on April 30:

Jackson County
Jackson Police Department; 216 E Washington Ave in Jackson (click here for a flyer)
Michigan State Police Jackson Post; 3401 Cooper Street in Jackson

Eaton County
Michigan State Police Lansing Post; 7119 North Canal Road in Lansing
Grand Ledge Police Department; 310 Greenwood St in Grand Ledge

Branch County
Branch County Sheriff’s Office Lobby Drop Box; 580 Marshall Road in Coldwater

Lenawee County
Lenawee County Sheriff’s Office / Promedica Bixby Hospital; 818 Riverside Avenue in Adrian

Monroe County
Michigan State Police Monroe Post; 300 Jones Avenue in Monroe

Washtenaw County
Washtenaw County Sheriff’s Office Main Lobby; 2201 Hogback Rd in Ann Arbor

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WLNS: Washington lawmakers approve Great Lakes bill

2016/04/26

The U.S. House has voted to extend for an additional five years a program designed to improve water quality in the Great Lakes and make progress on resolving their biggest environmental threats.

The measure authorizes spending $300 million annually on the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, although separate votes would be needed each year to provide the funding.

Two mid-Michigan congressmen supported the bill.

“The Great Lakes are a vast strategic resource and source of pride for the state of Michigan and our country as a whole,” said Rep. Tim Walberg in a press release. “Today’s bipartisan action will help protect this magnificent national treasure and preserve the health and vitality of the Great Lakes for the benefit of our environment and economy for generations to come,” he said in a press release. Walberg, a Republican, represents Michigan’s 7th District, which includes Jackson, Eaton, and Hillsdale counties.

“As a lifelong Michigan resident, I believe each of us has a responsibility to ensure the beautiful lakes, beaches and rivers we enjoy today will still be around for our children and their children in the years to come,” said Rep. Mike Bishop in another release. “Doing so will require improving the water quality, repairing local marshes and rooting out the invasive species encroaching on our shorelines – which are just some of the many priorities of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.” Bishop, also a Republican, represents Michigan’s 8th District, which includes Ingham and Livingston counties.

Congress has spent more than $2.2 billion on the program over the past seven years, funding more than 2,900 projects in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and Wisconsin.

Top priorities include cleaning up harbors and river mouths polluted with toxins, combating invasive species, restoring wildlife habitat and preventing runoff that causes algae blooms and beach closures.

A similar bill has cleared a Senate committee and awaits a floor vote.
 
Click here for the original story from WLNS.com. Read More

Walberg Backs Bipartisan Bill to Protect and Restore Great Lakes

2016/04/26

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) today applauded the unanimous passage of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Act, legislation that authorizes resources for local programs to protect and restore the Great Lakes ecosystem. The bipartisan bill addresses some of the challenges facing the Great Lakes region, including combating harmful algal blooms, preventing invasive species like Asian carp, restoring habitat to protect wildlife, and cleaning up areas of concern.

“The Great Lakes are a vast strategic resource and source of pride for the state of Michigan and our country as a whole. Today’s bipartisan action will help protect this magnificent national treasure and preserve the health and vitality of the Great Lakes for the benefit of our environment and economy for generations to come,” said Walberg.
 
Congressman Walberg serves on the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chair of the Workforce Protections Subcommittee. In addition, he serves on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. For more information on Walberg’s work in Congress visit walberg.house.gov. Read More

Jackson Cit Pat: Growing jobs and opportunity on Main Street

2016/04/25

Talk to nearly any small business owner or employee and they'll tell you how challenging it has become to grow and create jobs.

The combination of heavy-handed regulations, confusing paperwork requirements, and a complex and unfair tax code make it harder and harder to succeed.

The federal government should be asking small businesses how to help them thrive, not telling them how to run their companies.

So far this session, I've hosted roundtables and panel discussions in every county in the 7th District and toured more than 140 individual small businesses, farms, and manufacturers.

With input from workers and small business owners, I recently introduced the Main Street Jobs and Opportunity Act. The legislation will support new jobs by reducing regulatory burdens on small businesses and encouraging them to innovate, expand, and create more job opportunities in our community.

Complying with the maze of mandates and regulations in the president's health-care law is one continued obstacle to booming economic growth. The law misguidedly changed the generations-old definition of "full-time employment" down to 30-hours per week, resulting in a loss of hours and wages for workers. The bill would restore the traditional 40-hour work week definition, protecting workers and providing certainty for small businesses.

Excessive occupational licensing requirements before entering a new field are another barrier for individuals looking to find meaningful work. The Main Street Jobs and Opportunity Act seeks to reduce unnecessary red tape and create reciprocity over state lines, where licensing requirements and regulations can vary greatly depending on the state.

While the entire tax code is in need of a dramatic overhaul, one of the most unfair provisions is the Death Tax, which amounts to double or triple taxation upon the death of a loved one. Instead of punishing people for pursuing their dreams, the bill would permanently repeal the Death Tax and allow family-owned farms and small businesses to keep their hard-earned assets and pass it along to their loved ones.

The Main Street Jobs and Opportunity Act also establishes small business start-up accounts to make it easier for new entrepreneurs to get their company off the ground or expand their existing one. By creating tax-deductible savings accounts, we can open doors for would-be small business owners to access the capital they need to turn their idea into a new business with more jobs in the community.

Additional sections in the bill will provide much-needed paperwork relief, limit frivolous lawsuits, and increase accountability at the IRS.

The cumulative effect of excessive red tape and taxation is taking its toll. According to a recent survey by the National Federation of Independent Businesses, optimism among small business owners is at its lowest point in more than two years.

To restore confidence and create a more prosperous future for hard-working families, we need policies that help small businesses do what they do best—innovate, bring their products to market, and hire new workers.

The heart of our economy is the local diners, family farms, and small shops and manufacturers that are the staple of our neighborhoods. They put in an honest day's work, yet are still struggling to get ahead.

Let's focus on helping them by growing a healthy economy for Main Street, not just Washington's.

- U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg, R-Tipton, represents the 7th Congressional District.This op-ed originally appeared in the April 24 edition of the Jackson Citizen Patriot. Read More

Lansing State Journal: Allow for opportunity in 21st century workplace

2016/04/25

By Rep. Tim Walberg and Rep. Mike Bishop

For too many Americans, an underperforming economy has diminished opportunities to pursue their dreams and leave behind a better future for the next generation.

Millions of men and women are struggling to find full-time, good paying jobs. Wages across the country remain stagnant. Working families face one challenge after another to get ahead. As policymakers, we have a responsibility to do everything we can to help.

Recently we held a House Education and the Workforce subcommittee field hearing at Lansing Community College to hear from those affected by federal regulations coming out of Washington, DC. The panel took a close look at the maze of rules produced by entrenched and unelected bureaucrats who often forget how their top-down rulemaking personally affects Americans across the country.

A millennial from the Manhattan Institute stated that heavy-handed regulations inhibit young people from entering the workforce, limit workers from using 21st century technology like smartphones, and make it more difficult for innovative companies like Uber and AirBnB to exist. Another witness from the Michigan Health & Hospital Association noted that non-profits, like hospitals, would incur significant cost increases due to burdensome regulations, leaving fewer resources to devote to a non-profit’s main mission.

For almost 80 years, the Fair Labor Standards Act has been the foundation of our wage and hour standards and the law plays an important role in the lives of millions of hardworking Americans. A lot has changed in our workplaces over the last 80 years, however, and these outdated federal rules have not kept up. The law’s flawed and rigid regulatory structure creates confusion and uncertainty, raising more questions than it provides answers.

Of particular concern to the panelists was the Department of Labor’s proposed overtime rule, which the agency is in the process of finalizing. Instead of making changes to address the complexity of current regulations, the proposal will impose significant burdens on small businesses, limit workplace flexibility, and make it harder for workers to advance in their careers—ultimately hurting the very people who need help.

For example, the associate vice president for Human Resources at the University of Michigan answered, “it is inconceivable that it would not,” when asked whether the proposed overtime rule would negatively affect tuition. According to her testimony, the rule could cost the University of Michigan as much as $34 million to implement. Many other institutions of higher education have expressed similar concerns.

In order for a healthy economy, there are better ways to responsibly update current rules and regulations. We must take into account advances in technology and better reflect the innovations we have today. We also must do so in a way that does not place additional burdensome requirements on small business owners, does not stifle job creation, and does not limit opportunity and workplace flexibility.

As our economy changes, so should our policies to meet the needs of the 21st century workplace. Instead of giving more power to unelected bureaucrats, we should expand personal opportunity, empower hardworking men and women, and grow a healthy economy where more dreams, ingenuity, and freedom can become a reality.

Congressman Tim Walberg represents Michigan’s 7th District and serves on the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chairman of the Workforce Protections Subcommittee. Congressman Mike Bishop represents Michigan’s 8th District and serves on the House Education and the Workforce Committee. This op-ed originally appeared in the April 25 edition of the Lansing State Journal. Read More

Walberg, Dingell Introduce Bipartisan Prison Reform Legislation

2016/04/22

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) and Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (MI-12) introduced bipartisan legislation to bring more accountability to the federal prison system. H.R. 5042, the Federal Prisons Accountability Act, would require the Director of the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to receive a presidential appointment and a confirmation by the U.S. Senate, as is the case for nearly all other top federal law enforcement agency officials. Currently, the Director of BOP is appointed by the Attorney General and not subject to Senate approval. 

As the number of inmates and costs of incarceration have risen dramatically in recent decades, increasing congressional oversight will help ensure the agency is effectively using taxpayer resources, responsive to inmates and corrections employees, and successfully addressing the rehabilitation and mental health needs of the federal prison population. In Michigan, Washtenaw County is home to the Milan Federal Correctional Institution, which has approximately 1,500 inmates and 400 staff members.

“Our federal prison system is in dire need of reform, and we can begin by adding more oversight and accountability to the Bureau of Prisons,” said Congressman Walberg. “Congressional review is essential to ensuring an agency this large stewards taxpayer dollars well and remains focused on improving outcomes for both inmates and employees alike.”

“There is broad bipartisan support in Congress for criminal justice reform, and improving oversight of the Bureau of Prisons is a first step in ensuring better outcomes for inmates, employees and taxpayers,” said Congresswoman Dingell. “Mental health is an important aspect that is often overlooked, and improving Congressional oversight of the BOP will help ensure improving these services in our prisons is a priority.”

The bill was also introduced in the Senate earlier this year by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ), Rand Paul (R-KY), and Mike Lee (R-UT). 

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Walberg: Protect Hardworking Taxpayers by Reining in the IRS

2016/04/21

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Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tim Walberg (MI-07) voted this week for a series of bipartisan bills to protect taxpayer rights, increase accountability and transparency, and rein in abuse at the IRS. Click here to watch Congressman Walberg’s floor speech calling for common sense reforms to clean up the IRS.

“Not only is our current tax system broken, the agency in charge of enforcing it is too. Staggering mismanagement and incompetence at the IRS affects every one of our nation’s workers and small businesses and it’s time the agency starts working for them. With these bipartisan actions, the House continues to take important steps to protect hardworking taxpayers and increase accountability of how tax dollars are spent,” said Walberg. 

More details on the House-passed legislation:

H.R. 1206: No Hires for the Delinquent IRS Act
Prohibits the IRS from hiring additional employees until the Secretary of the Treasury certifies that no employee of the IRS has a serious delinquent tax debt.

H.R. 3724: Ensuring Integrity in the IRS Workforce Act
Prohibits the IRS from rehiring any individual who was previously employed by the IRS but was removed for misconduct or whose employment was terminated for cause.

H.R. 4885: IRS Oversight While Eliminating Spending (OWES) Act
Requires the IRS to deposit fees for service in the general fund of the Treasury, and prohibits the expenditure of such fees unless an appropriation is set by Congress.

H.R. 4890: IRS Bonuses Tied to Measurable Metrics Act
Places a ban on the payment of bonuses to employees of the IRS under the Department of the Treasury submits to Congress a comprehensive customer service strategy that has been reviewed and approved by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration.

Congressman Walberg serves on the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chair of the Workforce Protections Subcommittee. In addition, he serves on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. For more information on Walberg’s work in Congress visit walberg.house.gov.

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Walberg Questions TSA Employees on Agency Misconduct

2016-04-29 20:48:35


Walberg: Focus on Putting Students on Path to Success

2016-04-29 20:54:38


Walberg Encourages Participation in National Drug Take Back Day

2016-04-28 16:29:08


Walberg Chairs Hearing on New Silica Standards

2016-04-21 20:39:39


Walberg: Protect Taxpayers by Reining in IRS Abuse

2016-04-21 14:39:03


WLNS: Walberg Holds 6th Annual Job Fair in Jackson

2016-04-18 20:37:19


Walberg Questions the Taxpayer Advocate Regarding Issues with the IRS

2016-04-15 20:04:47


Walberg Discusses How Wellness Programs Benefit Workers

2016-04-15 19:00:56


Walberg Introduces Main Street Jobs and Opportunity Act

2016-04-14 14:05:36


Walberg Works to Reduce Wasteful Spending and Duplication

2016-04-13 19:29:07


WXYZ: Walberg, Dingell Host Washtenaw County Veterans Fair

2016-04-04 21:19:09


WLNS: Walberg chairs field hearing on workplace flexibility

2016-04-01 17:35:26


WLNS: Walberg Hosts Jackson Veterans Claims Fair

2016-04-01 17:21:23


WLNS: Walberg Tours LCC and Talks Millennials in the Workforce

2016-03-29 15:37:17


Walberg Questions Border Security Officials About Threats at the Border

2016-03-23 17:24:38


Walberg Honors Coldwater Resident Mary Smith on House Floor

2016-03-23 17:06:28


Protecting our communities from heroin and opioid abuse

2016-03-22 22:33:41


Walberg questions Governor Snyder about Legionnaires' outbreak in Flint

2016-03-17 15:59:53


Walberg Works to Prevent Wasteful Infrastructure Spending in Afghanistan

2016-03-16 19:25:02


Walberg questions Labor Secretary about workplace flexibility, overtime rule

2016-03-16 19:25:43


Contact Information

2436 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-6276
Fax 202-225-6281
walberg.house.gov

Tim Walberg is currently serving his third term in Congress as the representative of south-central Michigan.  The diverse constituency of Michigan’s 7th District encompasses Branch, Eaton, Hillsdale, Jackson, Lenawee, and Monroe Counties, along with parts of Washtenaw County.  Since first taking office, Tim has hosted hundreds of coffee and town hall meetings to better understand the thoughts and concerns of the district.

Prior to his time in public office, Tim served as a pastor in Michigan and Indiana, as president of the Warren Reuther Center for Education and Community Impact, and as a division manager for Moody Bible Institute.  He also served in the Michigan House of Representatives from 1983 to 1999, and is proud to bring his reputation as a principled legislator, fiscal reformer, and defender of traditional values to Washington.

In the 113th Congress, Tim serves on the House Education and the Workforce Committee as Chair of the Workforce Protections Subcommittee.  In addition, he serves on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

He and his wife, Sue, have been married for over 39 years, and enjoy spending time outdoors and riding on their Harley. They live in Tipton, Michigan, where they raised their three children: Matthew, Heidi and Caleb.


Serving With

Dan Benishek

MICHIGAN's 1st DISTRICT

Bill Huizenga

MICHIGAN's 2nd DISTRICT

Justin Amash

MICHIGAN's 3rd DISTRICT

John Moolenaar

MICHIGAN's 4th DISTRICT

Fred Upton

MICHIGAN's 6th DISTRICT

Mike Bishop

MICHIGAN's 8th DISTRICT

Candice Miller

MICHIGAN's 10th DISTRICT

Dave Trott

MICHIGAN's 11th DISTRICT

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