Steve Stivers

Steve Stivers

OHIO's 15th DISTRICT

Members of the Ohio Delegation Push for East Coast Missile Defense System to be Located at Camp Ravenna

2016/08/24

WASHINGTON, DC – Yesterday, Representative Steve Stivers (R-OH) joined with 16 Members of the Ohio Delegation to send a letter to Vice Admiral James D. Syring, Director of the Missile Defense Agency (MDA), requesting consideration of the Camp Ravenna Joint Military Training Center as the preferred site for the East Coast Missile Defense System. Signers of the letter included Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH), and Representatives Tim Ryan (D-OH), Dave Joyce (R-OH), Pat Tiberi (R-OH), Bill Johnson (R-OH), Brad Wenstrup (R-OH), Marcy Kaptur (D-OH), Warren Davidson (R-OH), Jim Renacci (R-OH), Marcia Fudge (D-OH), Joyce Beatty (D-OH), Jim Jordan (R-OH), Bob Gibbs (R-OH), Bob Latta (R-OH), and Steve Chabot (R-OH).

Missile Defense Systems are used to intercept ballistic missiles headed for American soil. In 2013, Congress voted as part of the National Defense Authorization Act to require the MDA to conduct environmental impact studies to search for potential sites for an East Coast Missile Defense System. With growing threats to our national security, especially from Iran and North Korea, an East Coast Missile Defense System would be an important addition for our national defense.

“Ohioans stand ready to support the defense of our nation and look forward to this potential opportunity to strengthen the regional economy,” the letter stated.

Camp Ravenna is located in Northeast Ohio, in close vicinity to the Akron and Youngstown transportation networks, making it easier to facilitate the flow of military and construction traffic this project would bring. Currently, there are two Missile Defense System locations in California and Alaska. Fort Drum in New York and the Fort Custer Training Center in Michigan are the other locations being considered on the East Coast.

“It is estimated that the $3.6 billion project could help support 2,300 jobs in the region during construction and directly employ up to 850 people full-time once the system is operational,” the letter stated. “This represents a significant investment in a region of our state that is continuing to recover economically.”

To read the full text of the letter, click here.

-30- Read More

Opiate summit looks at what's working where

2016/08/17

CIRCLEVILLE - Representatives of Ross County and Chillicothe attended an opiate summit Wednesday to discuss what they're doing in the community and hear about what's working in others.

The fourth opioid summit, hosted by U.S. Rep. Steve Stivers, invited organizations and people from throughout Ohio's 15th District to participate in a discussion about what is being done and what needs addressed in the fight against opioid addiction.

"I'm so proud of all the things that have been going on, but Ross County and Chillicothe have been a real leader in the fight against this opioid epidemic out there," Stivers said.

In Ross County, Stivers noted efforts in the Keys to Success program at Chillicothe High School; Centering Pregnancy, a program at Adena Regional Medical Center for pregnant women who are struggling with addiction; the Heroin Partnership Program; and the Ross County Sheriff's drug take-back program.

"Those are some of the things that are going on in Ross County that we're really excited about and need to make sure get passed on to folks all around the state because they can learn from what's going on in Ross County," Stivers said.

Representatives of programs and organizations outside Ross County were able to discuss their own efforts.

"I was really impressed with all the participants and how committed the different communities are to tackle the heroin epidemic in not only their communities but across the state," said Teri Minney, coordinator of the Heroin Partnership Project.

Kim Jones, Adena's community health director, also was grateful to hear about projects in other areas.

"You actually could take some of these things that they're doing, and replicating it, that makes it much easier. And finding out where they got the funding to do it, all the back end stuff that makes it so hard," Jones said.

Stivers invited the summit's participants to think about paying for success based on performance in programs, and he passed out information on available grant funds and key legislation, including the recently passed Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act. Attendees divided into four groups to directly address discussions on criminal justice, housing and employment, prevention, and treatment. The format was different than in years past, where the discussion has been styled as a roundtable.

"It allowed each individual area to dig deeper, and I think we probably got more participation because we essentially got four hours of discussion in one hour. But what was lost was the cross-talk between the areas so we're going to try to relook at it again and see if we can improve it even more. But I'm glad we let people try a new format," Stivers said.

The groups came together for the last half-hour of the summit to address some of their main talking points after the subsets allowed them to discuss what each organization represented was doing and what was needed in their own communities.

"For me, for sure, it's figuring out how to make sure we deal with funding for treatment. It is figuring out what we do to make sure that naloxone is available to local law enforcement and first responders to save lives of people that have overdosed. And we only talked about it a little bit, but this whole idea of re-entry and making sure that people are in recovery and come out of recovery can get a job and can go to school and have an opportunity at a second chance," Stivers said.

"This is really about a culture change, not just a law enforcement initiative but a culture change to combat drug addiction, and it takes all members of a community to do that," Minney said.

Stivers said he now has his do-to list for the next year. Read More

Stivers' Opioid Summit looks for solutions

2016/08/17

CIRCLEVILLE — Congressman Steve Stivers (R-OH) brought his fourth annual Opioid Summit to Ohio Christian University Wednesday in an effort to explore solutions to the drug epidemic. Stivers listened to the concerns of community leaders and officials from his 12-county district that includes Athens, Clinton, Fairfield, Fayette, Franklin, Hocking, Madison, Morgan, Perry, Pickaway, Ross and Vinton counties.

“There’s no panacea, there’s no silver bullet here, but what we’re looking for is to create a puzzle where we fill in all the pieces that deals with the drug epidemic in this country,” Stivers said.

The summit was split into four roundtable breakout groups that addressed drug treatment, prevention, housing & employment for recovering addicts, and criminal justice.

The Criminal Justice group was led by Eric Brown, deputy director of Ohio HIDTA (High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area). Representatives from law enforcement, the state legislature, and the legal community discussed how attitudes toward drug offenders have changed over the past several decades.

“We can’t prosecute our way out of this,” said Judge Frederick Moses with Hocking County Municipal Court. “Back in the 1980s it was, lock them up.”

Eric Brown said that the system is in the midst of a much-needed culture change.

“Public safety is coming together with public health,” he said. “We never used to know about preventative treatment. Now we have a better understanding of how we can work together.”

Terri Minney with Ross County’s Heroin Partnership Project said her group has been working with first responders to provide tools that help officers help the addicts they encounter on the streets.

“If an addict approaches an officer and says they want to get off of drugs, we’re providing cheat sheets to post in their cruisers so the officers will have resources to recommend,” Minney said. “We created resource cards for officers to hand out that list detox centers and information about amnesty programs.”

Other positive solutions discussed included the use of Vivitrol for addicts, and implementing drug courts that send low-level drug offenders to treatment instead of jail.

“We have a lot of opiate summits, so how do we judge success?” Eric Brown asked the group. “Reduction in overdose deaths—that’s how we judge success.”

Congressman Stivers visited all four breakout groups to hear the discussions and suggestions.

“That’s the beauty of this for me. I get the value of 100 experts in their own area who give me a to-do list that I walk out of here and try to execute,” he said. Read More

Opiate summit breaks down areas of success, need

2016/08/17

CIRCLEVILLE - The issues discussed at an opiate summit gave U.S. Rep. Steve Stivers his to-do list for the next year.

The fourth opioid summit hosted by Stivers, R-Columbus, invited organizations and people from throughout Ohio's 15th district to participate in a discussion about what is being done and what needs addressed in the fight against opioid addiction. Stivers said, like in years past, he will take the notes created from each discussion and use them to create his list going forward.

He invited the summit's participants to think about paying for success based on performance in programs, and he passed out information on available grant funds and key legislation, including the recently passed Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act.

The summit, hosted Wednesday at Ohio Christian University in Circleville, was divided into four groups this year to directly address discussions on criminal justice, housing and employment, prevention, and treatment. The format was different than in years past, where the discussion has been styled more like a roundtable but allowed groups to focus conversation on specific topics.

"It allowed each individual area to dig deeper, and I think we probably got more participation because we essentially got four hours of discussion in one hour. But what was lost was the cross-talk between the areas so we're going to try to relook at it again and see if we can improve it even more. But I'm glad we let people try a new format," Stivers said.

Dr. Adam Jackson, Chillicothe VA associate chief of primary care, said during the open discussion that he felt he missed the opportunity to hear perspectives from members of other groups, such as criminal justice and prevention, like he would have had in a roundtable discussion.

Fairfield County Sheriff Dave Phalen said the roundtable didn’t yield any surprises, but the format allowed all stakeholders to discuss their “common denominators.”

“We’re all kind of on the same page as we recognize the problem and need for treatment,” he said.

The groups came together for the last half-hour of the summit to address some of their main talking points after the subsets allowed them to discuss what each organization represented was doing and what was needed in their own communities.

The treatment group discussed the need for more detoxification facilities and workforce expansion for substance abuse positions, while the prevention group talked about how to expand the prevention efforts not only in schools but to adults.

Housing and employment group members expressed concerns over access to treatment, transitional and long-term housing for people in recovery, as well as prospective incentives to help employers better understand addiction and what it means to be in recovery.

"For me, for sure, it's figuring out how to make sure we deal with funding for treatment. It is figuring out what we do to make sure that naloxone is available to local law enforcement and first responders to save lives of people that have overdosed. And we only talked about it a little bit, but this whole idea of re-entry and making sure that people are in recovery and come out of recovery can get a job and can go to school and have an opportunity at a second chance," Stivers said.

The criminal justice group addressed the continued use and funding of naloxone, a drug that reverses the effects of an opioid overdose; getting community engagement; and the use of post-overdose response teams, similar to one model in Ross County that combines members of law enforcement with members of the recovery community to address the overdoses and solve the cases surrounding them to find the distributor.

"What we kept coming back to is the partnership between public safety and public health and how great it's become over the years,"  said Eric Brown, deputy director of the Ohio High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, who led the small group discussion. Brown is a former Major Crimes Unit commander.

Phalen said the success of drug courts and how they have helped long-time drug users also was a main topic, along with the importance of departments carrying Narcan, a brand of naloxone.

Phalen said the sheriff’s office has saved three lives so far with the drug.

Major Crimes Unit Commander Dennis Lowe said carrying naloxone has become even more important for law enforcement because of the increase in fentanyl in the area.

Fentanyl is a highly potent drug being sold falsely as heroin because it is more lucrative for the seller, he said. Fentanyl can be absorbed through skin or inhaled, which Lowe said could cause an overdose to anyone who comes in contact, even inadvertently.

Lowe said that means departments must consider carrying naloxone even if they haven’t in the past because of the safety risk to officers and informants who may encounter the drug. Read More

More Progress in the Battle Against Opiate Abuse

2016/08/16

The drug abuse epidemic is devastating communities and schools all across our country.  In fact, overdoses from prescription painkillers and heroin are now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. Even closer to home, the most recent data for Ohio shows that over 2,500 lives were lost to drug overdoses in 2014 alone. It is important we begin taking steps to break the cycle of drug abuse and crime in our communities – an effort that will take collaboration and a complete strategy at local, state and federal levels.

Recently, Congress reached a milestone in addressing this crisis by passing the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA). At its core, CARA provides much needed funding to federal agencies by establishing a system of enhanced grant programs to implement and monitor local efforts to treat and prevent drug abuse in communities where it is needed most. Furthermore, CARA empowers communities to effectively address local issues by authorizing a   $5 million Community-Based Coalition Enhancement Grant program.

Another key provision of CARA expands the distribution of Naloxone, a drug which can block the most harmful side effects of an opioid overdose to save lives. By opening up more access to Naloxone, first responders will have more time to administer medical treatment to someone overdosing on opioids and decrease overdose deaths. With over 2,200 lives that have already been saved by state funded Naloxone programs this past year, this is an important program that will be strengthened under CARA.

I am also proud to say that language from my bill, the Reducing Unused Medications Act, was included in the final version of CARA. This language allows patients and doctors to request a partial fill on their prescriptions in an effort curb the prevalence of unused medications available to be diverted or abused. This is just one more piece to the puzzle in keeping these drugs from falling into the wrong hands.

It was reassuring to see CARA signed into law by the President in a united effort to address this issue in our country.  While this issue will not be solved overnight, CARA is critical progress in the battle against drug abuse.

Whether voting on legislation in Washington or assisting you with a federal agency, it is my honor to serve you, and I look forward to hearing from you. Feel free to call my Washington, D.C. office at (202) 225-2015, Hilliard office at (614) 771-4968, Lancaster office at (740) 654-2654 or Wilmington office at (937) 283-7049 with any questions or comments you have about issues facing the federal government.

Read More

Get your salad at Rock Dove Farms

2016/08/10

A fresh, tiny, delicate microgreen, tossed onto a gourmet sandwich for color. Alas, vegetable confetti.

An array of purple and green lettuces, creating a crispy and flavorful bed for other vegetables to make the perfectly sophisticated salad.

A bouquet of bright green basil, waiting for a fat clove of garlic and toasted pine nuts to become a refreshing pesto.

Some may assume all of these vegetables — used by Columbus’ most trendy chefs in their farm-to-table movement — were grown in a modern, urban garden in the city.

But, they each came from organic seeds planted behind an 1890s white farmhouse between London and West Jefferson. Admittedly, fellow Madison countians know nothing of the 23-acre farm at the corner of State Route 142 and Gregg Road.

“We don’t have any signs,” said Todd Shriver, who owns Rock Dove Farms with wife, Heather.

The couple, in their mid-30s, seemed to stumble upon the land. With the help of some family members, they purchased the land and began their journey to transform the former grain farm into a certified organic vegetable farm.

Rock Dove Farm was started in 2010 — the same year they were married; the wedding came with the farm, Todd joked.

In June 2014 the farm was certified organic by the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA). There are about 800 organic farms in the state, according to Renee Hunt, OEFFA’s program director.

While Heather doesn’t come from a farming background, it’s all Todd has done his entire life. He grew up on a grain and livestock operation and studied cheese making in Vermont before attending college in Columbus and discovering his passion.

Heather works full-time as a physical therapist at Columbus City Schools and during the summers helps Todd, who works full-time on the farm.

Rock Dove is a member of the Great Rivers Organics cooperative, a farmer-owned nonprofit. The cooperative is built out of a network of organic farms which grow a diverse range of locally and organically-grown produce.

Upscale restaurants will reach out to the cooperative to find the freshest, local and organic produce. Rock Dove specializes in salad greens and lettuce, meaning the busiest seasons are in the spring and fall. The Shrivers also sell basil to Whole Foods.

Other produce grown includes arugula, escarole, friseé, tomatoes, leeks, onions, beets, carrots, radishes, bok choy, kale, chard, strawberries and turnips.

In addition to the cooperative, Rock Dove is a regular contributor to the Farmers Markets in Worthington and Clintonville. Due to the farm’s specialized items, it’s not necessarily feasible to participate in markets in Madison County, where shoppers’ tastes may not align with the farm’s products, Todd said.

The Shrivers are also members of the National Young Farmers Coalition. Members of the Columbus-area chapter were on hand at the farm to visit with U.S. Rep. Steve Stivers (R-Upper Arlington) on Tuesday.

Stivers took a tour of the farm and sampled some basil, plucked directly from beds in the greenhouse.

When asked by the congressman what policies would be most helpful for young farmers, Todd was quick to answer releasing graduates from mounds of student loan debt. He suggested a loan forgiveness program be in place for young farmers to allow recent graduates to make capital purchases.

“It’s a red mark on your balance sheet with nothing to offset it,” said Todd.

Stivers agreed tuition costs are too high — not just for young farmers but for all students.

“The raising cost of tuition is manifesting itself in a large amount of debt that limits people to start a business,” said Stivers. He said he would look into the matter.

Stivers also asked what can be done to further the advancement of the farm-to-table movement. Rachel Tayse, OEFFA’s board president, suggested food education — not just for the average resident but for chefs, as well.

“You have to make chefs understand farming,” she said. “If you want radishes now, you can’t always have them.”

Instead chefs need to work with the seasons and manipulate their menus accordingly. Restaurants using the farm-to-table method in Columbus best include Acre, Skillet and Harvest Pizzeria, Tayse said.

For more information about Rock Dove Farms, or to join their CSA, visit www.rockdovevegetables.com. Read More

Stivers to host open house at relocated Wilmington office

2016/08/09

COLUMBUS– U.S. Rep. Steve Stivers (R–OH) recently relocated his Wilmington District Office to the second floor of the Wilmington Municipal Building. He will be hosting a public open house to welcome constituents to visit the new space and spend a little time visiting with him and his district staff.

The open house will take place noon to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 16.

“We want our constituents to know where we are and that we are there to listen and to help them with any issues they are having with the federal government,” Stivers said.

In addition to his offices in Washington, D.C. and Wilmington, Congressman Stivers also has district offices in Hilliard (Franklin County) and Lancaster (Fairfield County), all in an effort to be as accessible as possible to the people of the 12-county 15th Congressional District.

Constituents may contact the Wilmington District Office via phone during business hours at 937-283-7049 and can also send messages anytime through Stivers’ website, www.Stivers.House.Gov.

Read More

A Better Way for Foreign Policy and National Defense

2016/08/08

Over the past few months, news of terrorist attacks has become all too familiar. With attacks from ISIS within our borders in San Bernardino and Orlando, we see the group becoming bolder and expanding its influence creating a significant national security threat both inside and outside of our borders.

The Administration has embraced a foreign policy strategy of leading from behind. From setting a dangerous precedent with the Iran nuclear deal, to refusing to establish a complete strategy to defeat ISIS, it is clear this policy has failed in nearly every situation. When America leads, the world is a safer place. I believe we need to stop leading from behind, and instead take the challenges we face head on.

This summer, House Speaker Paul Ryan and House Republicans released the “Better Way” plan to offer ideas and solutions to get America back on track. One portion of this plan is a better strategy to handle our national security and foreign policy challenges. This includes ideas to better protect our country, defeat ISIS, tackle new threats, and defend freedom around the world.

First and foremost, we must protect our country by keeping terrorists from reaching our soil. This means securing our borders to keep terrorists from coming in, while preventing people who live in America from being recruited and radicalized. While we are a nation of immigrants, we are also a nation of laws, and it is important to ensure those coming into our country are doing so legally and do not pose a threat to our citizens.

Keeping our country safe also means combating ISIS overseas. The President’s plan to join in air strikes has been assisted in the effort to contain ISIS. However, we not only need to contain ISIS, we need to defeat ISIS and their affiliates. The Better Way plan calls for a broad international coalition of allies and a comprehensive strategy to take the fight to ISIS and other terrorist groups. We have seen that these groups do not abide by borders. It is time we commit to preventing terrorists from attacking our country and allies, and from spreading their influence.

We have also seen a new kind of threat that has no borders – cyberattacks. The internet has become a dangerous weapon that can target governments, businesses, and private citizens. Terrorist organizations can use internet hackers against us, and it is important we address this by improving our cyber defenses and finding individuals carrying out these attacks.

In tackling these threats now, and in the future, our military and law enforcement need the proper resources to keep our country safe. Having served over 30 years in the Ohio National Guard, I understand the need for the federal government to maintain a strong national defense. While I have fought to reign in our overall spending and reduce our nation’s deficit, we cannot continue to allow arbitrary cuts and rollbacks to our military that hurt its ability to accomplish their missions.  We also need to be sure our intelligence and law enforcement agencies are working seamlessly together to identify potential threats.

An effective foreign policy strategy also means engaging our allies and promoting freedom around the world. International agreements are important to our foreign policy, but they should be made responsibly and in a way that does not threaten our national security. The flawed Iran agreement did not require nuclear disarmament and supports a country with a record of human rights abuses and supporting terrorism. This is backwards logic -- we should be holding countries like Iran more accountable and better supporting those nations that are committed to promoting democracy.

As we continue to address foreign policy and national security challenges, please know that it is my top priority to ensure the safety of you and your family. If you have questions or comments about this or any other issue facing the federal government, I invite you to call my Washington, D.C. office at (202) 225-2015, Hilliard office at (614) 771-4968, Lancaster office at (740) 654-2654 or Wilmington office at (937) 283-7049. To learn more about the Better Way plan, visit better.gop.
Read More

Deerfield Township Fire Department gets new truck

2016/08/06

CLARKSBURG - It's the very first brand new fire truck the department has ever owned.

Everything before the brand new truck received Thursday by the Deerfield Township Volunteer Fire Department had been used or converted for firefighter use, Mickey Smith, owner of Ohio First Responders Grant, and writer of the particular grant that afforded the truck for the township.

Without the grant, Smith said it would take the department 20 years and a tax increase to pay off a new truck such as the one it received. The federal government contributed $239,524, and the Deerfield Township Fire Department matched 5 percent.

"There's no way we could ever purchase the truck, but the grant made it possible," Deerfield Township Fire Chief Shawn Lindsey said.

The new custom-built truck, which was delivered Thursday night, has more storage space for equipment, a larger tank for more water storage along with a pump, and a four-door rather than a two-door cab. The truck being replaced was from 1989 and suffered from various safety issues, Lindsey said.

The new truck holds 2,000 gallons of water on board and has an additional tank on the side, while the pump can push out 750 gallons of water per minute, Smith said.

Lindsey said adding more doors to the cab allows them to bring more personnel to the scene in the truck, rather than having numerous personal vehicles in the area.

"They contacted me to do an assessment of the department and see if they qualified for a grant," Smith said. "We went this direction for improved safety and an increase of available on-scene water supply."

"The truck we replaced was basically unsafe, so we decided it was time to update the truck," Lindsey said.

The grant for the funds for the new truck, from the Assistance to Firefighters Grant program through the Federal Emergency Management Agency, was submitted Nov. 30, 2014, and the department was officially awarded the money July 31, 2015, Smith said. Just over a year later, the shiny new truck rolled into the station.

U.S. Rep. Steve Stivers wrote a letter in support of the grant request, as did US Sen. Sherrod Brown, Lindsey said.

Lindsey said they sent out specifications, received bids from several manufacturers, and found this particular truck to be best. He expects it to fit the department's needs as well as aid other townships in Ross and Pickaway counties, where they provide mutual aid on calls. Read More

Rep. Stivers' Statement Regarding the Passing of Former Congressman Steve LaTourette

2016/08/03

Regarding the passing of former Congressman Steve LaTourette, all of the following may be attributed to Congressman Steve Stivers (R-OH):
 
"Steve was a hard-working, smart, and thoughtful guy who always did what he thought was the right thing.

"The impact he has made on Cleveland, Ohio, and our nation through the years stands as a testament to his service and character." Read More

Loading legislation ... one moment please
Loading votes ... one moment please

Contact Information

1022 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-2015
Fax 202-225-3529
stivers.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Financial Services

Rules

Raised in Ripley, Ohio, Steve Stivers learned from his mother and father the importance of family, hard work and public service, which have been the values he has carried with him through his life, whether as a student at The Ohio State University, a soldier serving overseas, as a State Senator, or as a Member of Congress.

Stivers is currently serving his third term as a Member of Congress and represents Ohio’s 15th Congressional District, which is made up of 12 counties including: all of Athens, Clinton, Fairfield, Hocking, Madison, Morgan, Perry, Pickaway, and Vinton counties, and parts of: Fayette, Franklin, and Ross counties.

Stivers is serving his third term his third term on the Financial Services Committee, which oversees the banking, insurance, real estate, public and assisted housing, and securities industries. Members who serve on the committee also work on housing and consumer protection legislation and oversee Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Federal Reserve Bank.

In addition, Stivers has been tapped to serve on the Committee on Rules, which is charged with determining which bills reach the House Floor for a vote. Historically, the Committee is often known as “The Speaker’s Committee” because it was chaired by the Speaker up until 1910 and is the means through which the Speaker of the House manages the House Floor. The Committee also determines how long and under what rules the full body of the House will debate each bill.

Throughout his career, Steve Stivers has led the way supporting programs and initiatives to encourage job creation, promote economic development, and put our country’s fiscal house in order. As he wrapped up a successful first term in office, two of Stivers veterans bills, the HIRE at Home Act and TRICARE for Kids, were rolled into the National Defense Authorization Act and signed into law by the President. In his second term in office, Stivers had two bills make their way to the President’s desk. These two bills, H.R. 1391 and H.R. 4189,would re-name two postal facilities located in Ohio’s 15th Congressional District after our fallen veterans. These bills are a small measure Congress can take to honor the lives of brave service members who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedoms.

Prior to running for Congress, Stivers served in the Ohio Senate and before that worked in the private sector for the Ohio Company and Bank One, where he focused on promoting economic development and encouraging job creation.

A career soldier, Stivers has served 29 years in the Ohio Army National Guard and holds the rank of Colonel. He served the United States overseas during Operation Iraqi Freedom in Kuwait, Iraq, Qatar and Djibouti where he led 400 soldiers and contractors and is proud that each and every one returned home safely to the United States. Stivers received the Bronze Star for his leadership throughout the deployment.

Stivers received both his bachelor’s degree and his MBA from The Ohio State University and resides in Columbus with his wife, Karen, and children, Sarah and Sam.


Serving With

Steve Chabot

OHIO's 1st DISTRICT

Brad Wenstrup

OHIO's 2nd DISTRICT

Jim Jordan

OHIO's 4th DISTRICT

Bob Latta

OHIO's 5th DISTRICT

Bill Johnson

OHIO's 6th DISTRICT

Bob Gibbs

OHIO's 7th DISTRICT

Warren Davidson

OHIO's 8th DISTRICT

Michael Turner

OHIO's 10th DISTRICT

Pat Tiberi

OHIO's 12th DISTRICT

David Joyce

OHIO's 14th DISTRICT

Jim Renacci

OHIO's 16th DISTRICT

Recent Videos