Scott Tipton

Scott Tipton

COLORADO's 3rd DISTRICT

Leadville Town Hall Meeting with Congressman Scott Tipton

2014/07/25

Congressman Scott Tipton will hold a town hall meeting in Alamosa on Wednesday, August 6. During the meeting Tipton will answer questions from constituents and provide an update on the work that he’s doing to encourage economic growth and job creation in the 3rd District. The meeting will last approximately one hour.

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Alamosa Town Hall Meeting with Congressman Scott Tipton

2014/07/25

Congressman Scott Tipton will hold a town hall meeting in Alamosa on Monday, August 4. During the meeting Tipton will answer questions from constituents and provide an update on the work that he’s doing to encourage economic growth and job creation in the 3rd District. The meeting will last approximately one hour.

 

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Witnesses Testify that Landowners Need Protection from Federal Land Management Agencies

2014/07/24

WASHINGTON—Today, during a House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation oversight hearing, witnesses testified on abuses they have suffered at the hands of federal land management agencies and emphasized that Western landowners oftentimes have no protection or recourse when the government sets its sights on their land.

“As Cattle Growers' President, we are dealing daily with individual and collective efforts to remove families like mine from the land. The worst part is that we have no recourse,” testified Jose Varela Lopez, President of the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association.

Read Lopez’s full testimony HERE.

Tipton asked Lopez if he had received notification when the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) began buying-up and locking-down lands surrounding his property which resulted in the decrease of his property value and loss of his ability to utilize his land.

“They did not notify me. It’s my understanding that in talking to them recently that normally they do not notify the adjoining landowners because when they make agreements with certain nonprofits like the Trust for Public Land and others, it’s usually a hush-hush deal. They don’t want anybody to know what they’re doing, and so when I found out about all of these things it was after the fact,” Lopez answered.

Watch Tipton’s Q&A with the Witnesses HERE

Lopez went on to say, “If I had known about this before this happened we could have come to some agreement in doing a land exchange or something like that that would have benefited both of us.”

Tipton recently introduced two pieces of legislation that seek to increase transparency and accountability in federal land exchanges and transactions, require notification of land transactions, and help provide landowners with protections when federal land managers make mistakes.

“Today’s hearing speaks to something that Coloradans have experienced for far too long—federal land management agency abuse. It seems to be commonsense that landowners should be protected from federal land management agency mistakes and abuses of their power. But unfortunately, when government makes the mistake or acts inappropriately, it’s the American people that suffer, left with no recourse or line of defense to protect their livelihoods as we heard in today’s hearing,” said Tipton. “We’ve seen this in the 3rd District where numerous landowners have been the victims of BLM survey mistakes that in some cases weren’t discovered until after numerous resurveys, sometimes decades later. In these cases, it wasn’t BLM employees that were held accountable for their actions, but the landowners who were forced to pay fines and even charged with trespassing despite having no way of knowing that the BLM surveys were wrong. My legislation takes needed steps to provide landowners with protections to ensure they are not left to suffer the consequences when land management agency employees make mistakes, and would also require that impacted landowners receive proper advance notification whenever the federal government is involved in a land exchange. This will increase accountability and transparency in federal land transactions and give affected neighboring landowners an opportunity to take action to protect their livelihoods.”

Lopez testified to the Committee that Tipton’s legislation (H.R. 5074) would be beneficial in cases like his.

H.R. 5075, the Resurveys Entitle Adjacent Landowners to Protection (REAL Protection) Act offers commonsense reforms to the BLM resurvey process by creating a more transparent and equitable process of conducting resurveys and advances the rights of landowners by providing safeguards against BLM actions.

H.R. 5074, the Land Adjacency Notification and Disclosure (LAND) Act, seeks to improve the transparency, oversight and notification of land exchanges involving U.S. Forest Service (USFS) lands or public lands under the jurisdiction of the BLM. 

Learn more about Tipton’s landowner protection bills HERE.

The full list of witnesses and their testimony is available HERE.

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Tipton Works to Enhance Transparency and Empower Students in Higher Education

2014/07/24

WASHINGTON—Stressing the need for greater flexibility and transparency in higher education, Rep. Scott Tipton (R-CO) voted to advance three pieces of legislation this week to promote innovative competency-based learning, and provide students and parents with information needed to make sound decisions on academic programs and tuition financing options.

The Strengthening Transparency in Higher Education Act (H.R. 4983) seeks to streamline and improve existing federal transparency efforts to reduce duplication and confusion, and provide more accurate information to students on higher education consumer information including student success rates and total cost of programs. The Empowering Students through Enhanced Financial Counseling Act (H.R. 4984) will promote financial literacy and ensure that students have a complete picture of the loan, aid and grant programs available to them to finance their tuition and make sound financial decisions.

“Deciding to go to college, choosing a program, and figuring out how to pay for it are among the most important decisions a young person can make, and for most, the decisions will have a lasting impact on their lives for many years,” said Tipton. “This legislation will empower students and their parents to make the best possible decision by ensuring that they have access to clear and accurate information on total costs of the program from start to finish and the best financing options available to meet the needs of their unique situation. With this information in hand, students will be in a much better position to choose the program that works best for them, and repay their student loans. Given the tough economy and competitive jobs market, every advantage that a student has available to them, from when they first enter college to when they graduate, is important to their overall success. ”

Tipton also voted to pass legislation that seeks to provide higher education institutions with greater flexibility to better meet the educational needs of individual students. The Advancing Competency-Based Education Demonstration Project Act (H.R. 3136) would allow higher learning institutions to measure students’ learning based on their competency with the subject matter, rather than solely on the amount of time they spend in the classroom (credit hours).

“By allowing colleges and universities to develop innovative programs that measure student success based on what they learn and what they know, rather than on how long they are seated in a classroom, students would be able to receive a higher quality, more personalized and cost-effective education that truly meets their needs,” said Tipton.

In January, 2014, Tipton joined his Colorado colleagues in a letter to the U.S. Secretary of Education asking that he join them in support of this concept at the Colorado State University-Global Campus (CSU-Global).

The members wrote:

“CSU-Global’s proposal will utilize Credit by Exam (CBE) and Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) programs to decrease students’ time to completion and the cost of a degree, while also allowing students who demonstrate competencies based on their professional experience and non-collegiate learning to obtain credit for their learning…We urge you to support CSU-Global’s application to be an experimental site and would welcome an opportunity to work with you on this endeavor.”

See the full letter HERE.

Learn more about H.R. 3136, H.R. 4984 and H.R. 4983.

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Small Agriculture Businesses Advocate For New SBA Size Standard

2014/07/24

Size Standard Said To Be Outdated And Inequitable

WASHINGTON, DC – The Small Business Subcommittee on Agriculture, Energy and Trade, under the chairmanship of Rep. Scott Tipton (R-CO), today held a hearing to examine the small business size standard for agricultural businesses. The purpose of the hearing was to determine whether the current standard accurately reflects the structural and economic realities of modern small agriculture production operations and evaluate whether it should be changed to better fit today’s industry and increase participation in federal procurement, as well as improve regulatory analysis of how new rules affect small businesses.  

The Small Business Act authorizes the Small Business Administration (SBA) to establish small business size standards, which are normally either employee or revenue-based. Unlike the size standards established for all other industries by the SBA, the size standard for agriculture enterprises are statutorily established. In 1984, SBA lowered the size standard for small agricultural enterprises to $100,000 in annual receipts from $500,000. Congress believed this was too low, and would exclude the vast majority of family farms, so in 1985 the size standard was increased to $500,000. In 2000, Congress updated the size standard to $750,000 in annual receipts.

"Today’s hearing provided a necessary dialogue about whether the agriculture size standard is adequate for today’s economy,” said Chairman Tipton. “The wrong size standard may harm legitimately small agricultural producers by denying them access to SBA programs, such as the federal contracting programs and loan programs. Additionally, many federal agencies view these standards as the default small business size standard when considering their obligations under the Regulatory Flexibility Act, which requires agencies to analyze how their rules will affect small entities. In the coming months, this Committee will continue exploring solutions to the problems we heard today, including whether the current statutory standard needs be updated and the best process for doing so.”

Materials from the hearing are available on the Committee’s website HERE.

Notable Quotes:

Mark Oestman, Owner of Oestman Farms, LLC in Eckley, Colorado said, “I believe that the Small Business Administration should seriously consider substantially raising the arbitrary $750,000 [size standard] in receipts that currently exists for agriculture producers. The dynamics of today’s farms and farmers, especially those who farm as their sole source of income, have changed dramatically and I believe the limit should as well. Due to factors largely out of a farmer’s control, my total receipts and expenses can change dramatically from year to year, and I believe that SBA standards should take many of those factors into consideration and increase the standard."  Ken Keesaman, Owner of KK Farms Red Angus in Osborn, Missouri said, “The evolution of today’s livestock industry has shifted and in order for family businesses to survive we have expanded and diversified our operations. In terms of agriculture, today’s small business has changed and it is appropriate for the size standards applied by the Small Business Administration to more accurately represent today’s small operations. It is my understanding that agriculture is the only industry where the statute establishes our size standard. With that being the case, Congress must change the statue and consider alternatives to the current size standards so they more accurately reflect today’s small businesses.”

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Tipton Cautions that EPA Wage Garnishing Rule Isn’t Over

2014/07/17

WASHINGTON— Congressman Scott Tipton (R-CO) warned that the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) announcement this week that it was abandoning the direct implementation of a proposed rule to garnish Americans’ paychecks to collect fines shouldn’t be construed as the agency backing away from the rule.

The EPA quietly published the rule in the federal register earlier this month, and was attempting to sneak it through without sufficient input or oversight with the intent of directly implementing it on September 2, 2014. In a change of course this week, the EPA announced that because of comments received, it would change the process to a public comment period extended through September 2, before making any final decisions on the rule.

“While it’s good that Americans will now have an opportunity to make comments on this overreaching rule, it’s important to note that the EPA is not backing down. Should the rule be implemented, the EPA would be ignoring the due process rights of American citizens by taking directly from their paychecks without so much as a court order. We are continuing our efforts in Congress to keep this rule from ever being implemented and to protect the rights of the American people,” said Tipton. “For every invasive and overreaching rule at the EPA that is stopped or delayed, there are many more forthcoming that seek to restrict the ability of Americans to earn a living, pay their bills, and prosper. We will  continue to fight to stop the wage garnishing rule and others including proposed EPA rules to expand the agency’s regulatory scope over virtually all U.S. surface water and implement a significant backdoor tax on affordable energy—hurting rural communities and families on fixed incomes the most. We must remain vigilant and work together in Congress to thwart this federal overreach at every opportunity.”

The EPA announcement follows a scathing letter sent on July 11 by Tipton and a number of his House colleagues, calling for the rule’s immediate withdrawal. In the letter to EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, they outlined their concerns on the proposed rule and called into question its legality.

View the letter HERE.

Public comments can be made through September 2 at: http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=EPA-HQ-OA-2014-0012

 

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Tipton Votes to Stop Abuse, Cut Waste at the IRS

2014/07/16

WASHINGTON—Congressman Scott Tipton (R-CO) voted to protect Americans from suffering further abuse by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Tipton and his House colleagues passed the Fiscal Year 2015 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act (H.R. 5016), today. The bill includes protections for taxpayers against IRS targeting and abuse of power, cuts wasteful spending, and increases accountability and transparency at the agency.

“The abuse of power and deception that has occurred at the IRS is the reason Americans are rightfully skeptical of their government. It was deplorable that the IRS targeted specific groups solely because they had different ideologies than the current Administration, and it is appalling that the IRS claims to have lost emails from Lois Lerner and others central to the scandal. While the investigation continues so that those involved will face consequences for their actions, it is important to take steps to prevent this from happening again,” said Tipton. “Today, we took action in Congress to increase accountability and transparency, and cut waste at the IRS. No longer will the agency be able to abuse taxpayers for their ideological beliefs, give out bonuses to underperforming employees, or waste millions of taxpayer dollars on frivolous conferences and videos. These are necessary and positive steps as we work to protect the American people from federal overreach and abuse of power.”

The Financial Services Appropriations Act includes provisions to:

  • Target Overreach and Abuse: Prohibits the IRS from targeting individuals for exercising freedom of speech, prevents the IRS from revising or implementing new regulations on non-profits, protects Americans from being targeted based on their ideological beliefs, and prevents the IRS from using funds to enforce the individual mandate in the President’s healthcare law.
  • Cut Waste: Reduces IRS funding by nearly $1.5 billion (15 percent of the agency’s overall budget), bans bonuses for employees that don’t pay their taxes or fail to do their jobs, and prohibits the waste of taxpayer funds on frivolous conferences and videos.
  • Increase Accountability and Transparency: Prohibits the destruction of records, protects confidential taxpayer information, and requires the IRS to train employees in ethics and impartial application of tax law.
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Tipton Effort to Protect Water Rights Advances in Interior Appropriations Bill

2014/07/15

WASHINGTON—Today, the House Appropriations Committee included Congressman Scott Tipton’s (R-CO) language to protect privately-held water rights as part of the FY 2015 Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Act. Tipton’s language, which was included in the bill advanced during a Committee markup today, prohibits funds from being used by the federal government to take privately-held water without compensation.

In March, Tipton and a number of his western colleagues wrote House Appropriators to request that the language be included:

Over the past decade, there have been numerous cases when the federal government has attempted to circumvent long-established state water law in order to take privately-held water rights without paying for them. By using the federal permit, lease, and land management process to extort water rights from those who hold rights under state law, the federal government is overreaching, violating private property rights, and the United States Constitution.

As you know, water is the lifeblood of the Western United States and all water users including grazers, farmers, ski areas, businesses, tribes and municipalities need certainty that all federal land management agencies, not just the Forest Service, are prohibited from future attempts to take privately-held water rights. Therefore, my colleagues and I are submitting the following report language for consideration in the fiscal year 2015 Appropriations bill to protect privately held water rights from uncompensated federal takings.

“None of the funds made available in this or any other Act may be used to condition the issuance, renewal, amendment, or extension of any permit, approval, license, lease, allotment, easement, right-of-way, or other land use or occupancy agreement on the transfer of any water right, including sole and joint ownership, directly to the United States, or any impairment of title, in whole or in part, granted or otherwise recognized under State law, by Federal or State adjudication, decree, or other judgment, or pursuant to any interstate water compact.

Additionally, none of the funds made available in this or any other Act may be used to require any water user to apply for or acquire a water right in the name of the United States under State law as a condition of the issuance, renewal, amendment, or extension of any permit, approval, license, lease, allotment, easement, right-of-way, or other land use or occupancy agreement.”

See their full letter HERE.

The FY 2015 Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Act included their requested language under Section 438. See the bill HERE.

As one of Congress’s most vocal defenders of Colorado and Western water and private property rights, Tipton is leading the charge to stop federal attempts to take or inhibit access to those rights. Tipton is currently fighting to block implementation of proposed EPA and Forest Service regulations that would amount to the largest federal water grab in American history, and recently raised concerns that a proposed ski area permit condition is a façade while the Forest Service continues to attempt to obtain private water rights.

In April, the U.S. House of Representatives passed Tipton’s Water Rights Protection Act (H.R. 3189), with bipartisan support, to uphold state water law and protect private water rights from uncompensated federal takings. The bill is currently awaiting a vote in the Senate.

The Water Rights Protection Act:

  • Prohibits federal land management agencies from implementing a permit condition that requires the transfer of privately-held water rights to the federal government in order to receive or renew a permit for the use of land;
  • Prohibits the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture from imposing other conditions that require the transfer of water rights without just compensation;
  • Upholds longstanding federal deference to state water law; and
  • Has no cost to taxpayers.

 

 

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Tipton’s Language to Prohibit Sage Grouse ESA Listing Included in Interior Bill

2014/07/15

Funds cannot be used to list Gunnison or Greater Sage Grouse under the bill

WASHINGTON—Today, the House Appropriations Committee included Congressman Scott Tipton’s (R-CO) language to prohibit the use of any funds under the FY 2015 Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Act to be used to list the Gunnison or Greater Sage Grouse as threatened or endangered species. The bill was advanced during a Committee markup today.

In April, Tipton wrote House Appropriators:

“I am also writing to request that the following language be added to the FY 2015 Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations bill stating:

‘None of the funds made available by this Act may be used to add the Gunnison-Sage Grouse to the list of threatened species or endangered species published under section 4(c) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1553 (c)).’

The adoption of this language is designed to postpone the [Department of Interior’s ] impulsive march towards listing the Gunnison Sage-Grouse as a threatened or endangered species.  The proposed ESA listing would designate 1.7 million acres in southwest Colorado and southeastern Utah as critical habitat - including private land which would be off limits to most use and development, including agricultural production and grazing, without providing any compensation.  Although this blanket management approach may be convenient for BLM to administer, it fails to account for the unique geography and environment of the region.”

See the full letter HERE.

Tipton also joined three of his House colleagues on letter requesting similar language for the Greater Sage Grouse. See their letter HERE.

The FY 2015 Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Act included the requested language under Section 117 to prohibit funds from being used to implement of the Gunnison and Greater Sage Grouse. See the bill HERE.

Tipton has been a vocal proponent of state and local species preservation efforts in Congress and recently introduced legislation, the Sage Grouse Protection and Conservation Act (H.R. 4716), with his Western colleagues including Rep. Cory Gardner (R-CO) to prevent the sage grouse from being listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for 10 years. The bill would instead require states to develop conservation management plans to meet the unique needs of the Sage grouse in each state.

“The most effective species preservation plans according to biologists and other experts are locally-tailored to take into consideration the unique ecology and topography of the region in which the habitat occurs.  Colorado has been at the forefront of developing these types of effective local preservation plans for the sage grouse, and these efforts should be given every opportunity to succeed and increase the grouse population without interference from Washington,” said Tipton. “If the goal is truly to protect the sage grouse, then a one-size-fits all listing out of Washington is not the answer. It is not only less effective than locally-tailored plans, but jeopardizes the ongoing work being done in states to preserve and recover the species.”

Tipton has also co-sponsored four pieces of legislation (H.R. 4315, H.R. 4316, H.R. 4317, and H.R. 4318) to increase transparency and update the Endangered Species Act listing process. The legislation, which is awaiting a committee markup, would bring greater transparency to the ESA process by requiring federal agencies to disclose scientific data and cooperate with states. This would ensure the best available scientific data is being used to most effectively preserve a species. Read more HERE.

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Tipton Introduces Legislation to Protect Landowners

2014/07/14

WASHINGTON—Congressman Scott Tipton (R-CO) introduced two pieces of legislation to protect private landowners from federal land management agency errors, and increase transparency in federal land exchanges and acquisitions.

In 2009, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) conducted a resurvey of federal land in Mesa County, Colorado.  The BLM initiates resurveys under the guise that existing boundary lines were inaccurately drawn during the initial survey, which in some instances may have occurred over fifty years ago.  The resurvey resulted in the reclassification of land, originally thought to be owned by a private owner as federal land. The BLM charged that individual with trespassing and the illegal removal of sand and gravel from federal lands, which resulted in a fine of over $250,000.  Unfortunately, this deeply concerning story is not unique. Other private landowners, around the nation and in Colorado face similar situations—forced to relinquish property, believed to be their own, on which they have lived and worked on for generations, and without any just compensation, due to BLM land resurveys.

“Landowners, thought to be the legal owners of land not included in the original boundaries, not only unfairly suffer an infringement on their private property rights, but could also be subject to retroactive trespass penalties and fines as the result of mistakes made by the federal government.  The current process is unfair and punitive to landowners who, through no fault of their own, have been victims of survey errors made by the BLM,” said Tipton. “The REAL Protection Act will give Americans needed protections to ensure that when the BLM makes an error, private land owners aren’t penalized and forced to pay the price for the agency’s mistakes.”

H.R. 5075, the Resurveys Entitle Adjacent Landowners to Protection (REAL Protection) Act offers commonsense reforms to the BLM resurvey process by creating a more transparent and equitable process of conducting resurveys and advances the rights of landowners by providing safeguards against BLM actions.

Tipton also introduced H.R. 5074, the Land Adjacency Notification and Disclosure (LAND) Act, which seeks to improve the transparency, oversight and notification of land exchanges involving U.S. Forest Service (USFS) lands or public lands under the jurisdiction of the BLM. 

The federal government manages nearly 640 million acres in the United States, including 50 percent in the 11 westernmost states.  Given the federal government’s ownership over vast amount of lands, agencies such as the BLM and the USFS often acquire, convey, or exchange these lands with willing private entities, individuals, or state and local governments. Unfortunately, the notification and oversight process regarding federal land conveyances has been implemented arbitrarily and often times to the detriment of uninformed adjacent land owners.

“With the Federal Government controlling such a substantial amount of land, especially in the Western United States, it is vital that the process by which it purchases, sells, or transfers property is transparent and involves a simplified, consistent and fair public notification process,” said Tipton. “By increasing transparency and notification in this process, we can better ensure that the public interest is being served in federal land exchanges and that adjacent landowners receive timely and comprehensive public notification of these pending exchanges. Additionally, to ensure the accuracy of land appraisals, evaluators should be equipped with accurate and transparent information that discloses the land’s intended use by those holding purchasing contracts related to the parcel of land.”

Background:

H.R. 5075, the REAL Protection Act will:

  • Protect landowners if a resurvey results in the reclassification of federal lands previously thought to be privately owned. The persons thought to be a private owner of such land shall –
  • Be given the right of first refusal to purchase the land for fair market value  minus the value of any significant improvement made to such lands; or
  • Be reimbursed for the fair market value of any significant improvement made to such lands; and
  • May not be charged with willful trespass onto such lands unless the person used such lands with the knowledge that the lands were, in fact, federal land.
  • Require the BLM to notify all property owners with land abutting or adjacent to federal land being resurveyed of the pending resurvey, no later than 30 days before commencement of the resurvey. Additionally, the Secretary shall publish a notice in the Federal Register no later than 30 days after the completion of the survey.

H.R. 5074, the LAND Act will:

  • Require the Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture to provide advanced written notification to each adjacent landowner to the parcel of land to be acquired.
  • If the acquisition process involves the use of a third-party facilitator, the Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture, as a condition of the approval of the acquisition, must require – 
  • Submission of all purchase contracts and related agreements held by the third-party facilitator related to the parcel to be acquired; and
  • Supervisor review of all purchase contracts and related agreements, the purpose of the conveyance, and other terms and conditions of the acquisition.
  • Require the Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture to provide advanced written notification to each adjacent landowner to the parcel of land to be conveyed. 
  • If the conveyance process involves the use of a third-party facilitator, the Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture, as a condition of the approval of the conveyance, must require –
  • Submission of all purchase contracts and related agreements held by the third-party facilitator related to the federal land to be conveyed;
  • Submission to appraisers of contact information for prospective end owners of the federal land to be conveyed; and
  • Supervisor review of all purchase contracts and related agreements, the purpose of the conveyance, and other terms and conditions of the conveyance.

 

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Contact Information

218 Cannon HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-4761
Fax 202-226-9669
tipton.house.gov

Congressman Scott Tipton was raised in Cortez, Colorado. He graduated from Ft. Lewis College in Durango, where he studied Political Science and became the first person in his family to earn a college degree. After college, he returned home to Cortez and co-founded Mesa Verde Indian Pottery with his brother Joe. It was through his business that Scott met his wife, Jean, who is a former school teacher. The Tipton’s have two daughters, Liesl and Elizabeth, and two  sons-in-law, Chris and Jace.

After a lifetime running his small business, Scott was elected as a Republican to the Colorado House of Representatives for the 58th District in November of 2008. During his time at the state House, he worked to ensure quality water for the people of Colorado and to improve the air quality of Southwest Colorado. He also sponsored legislation to protect children from the worst criminal offenders by mandating harsher penalties for child sex-offenders and allowing law enforcement to collect DNA evidence from suspects through Jessica’s Law and Katie’s Law.

Scott was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010 and again in 2012 for a second term.

In the 112th Congress, Scott pushed hard to advance a federal version of Katie’s Law to encourage additional states to implement minimum DNA collection standards and enhanced collection processes for felons in order to strengthen law enforcement’s ability to prevent violent crimes, and protect women and children.  That effort became a reality when the President signed Katie’s Law on January 3, 2013.

Using his positions on the House Natural Resources, Agriculture and Small Business Committees, Scott has is fighting for the issues that most directly impact Coloradans, many of which involve our state’s extensive open spaces and natural resources.  In his first term, Scott introduced legislation to encourage healthy forest management and prevent wildfire, as well as passed a bill in the House with bipartisan support to advance the development of clean, renewable hydropower.  He is also leading the charge in Congress to stop a federal grab of privately-held water rights, standing up for farmers and ranchers, the ski industry, and all who rely on their water rights to survive.

Scott is champion of advancing an all-of-the-above energy solution that balances common sense conservation with responsible development. He passed the Planning for American Energy Act through the House (as a title under the American Domestic Energy and Jobs Act) to put requirements into place to develop wind, solar, hydropower, geothermal, oil, natural gas, coal, oil shale and minerals, based on the needs of the American people.

Scott has used his experience as a small businessman to inform his work as a Subcommittee Chairman on the Small Business Committee. Here he has worked to protect farmers and ranchers from regulatory overreach, as well as push for expanded trade opportunities for Colorado products. Scott is a co-founder of the Congressional Small Business Caucus, a bipartisan caucus committed to open dialogue on the issues that most impact small businesses.  Members of the Congressional Small Business Caucus are dedicated to advancing efforts to foster the economic certainty needed for small businesses and entrepreneurs to succeed and create jobs.

In the 113th Congress, Scott continues to represent the many interests of one of the most diverse and geographically vast districts in the nation. He will fight to bring Colorado common sense to Washington—focusing on reforming regulation, protecting Colorado’s natural environment, encouraging responsible all-of-the-above energy development, reducing government spending, and removing hurdles so that small businesses can do what they do best—create jobs.


Serving With

Cory Gardner

COLORADO's 4th DISTRICT

Doug Lamborn

COLORADO's 5th DISTRICT

Mike Coffman

COLORADO's 6th DISTRICT

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