Mike Simpson

Mike Simpson

IDAHO's 2nd DISTRICT

Simpson’s Wilderness Water Bill Signed into Law

2014/07/25

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson expressed great satisfaction at the news that H.R. 876, the Idaho Wilderness Water Resources Protection Act, which he authored, has been signed into law.  Simpson first introduced the legislation in 2009, and today it was signed by the president.

The Idaho Wilderness Water Resources Protection Act corrects a long-standing oversight in law by authorizing a number of water diversions within the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness Area and the Selway-Bitteroot Wilderness Area in Idaho which existed before the wilderness was created.  The new law will enable landowners to do the necessary maintenance and repairs on these diversions.

“I’m so pleased that the Idaho Wilderness Water Resources Protection Act has finally been signed into law,” said Simpson.  “I introduced this bill five years ago when the Forest Service discovered that it didn’t have the authority to permit repairs on an historic water diversion in the Frank Church.  When we looked into the issue, we learned that a number of pre-existing diversions had been overlooked when the wilderness areas were created.  Any one of these diversions could need repairs to maintain integrity and protect the surrounded ecosystem.  With enactment of this bill, the necessary maintenance and repairs can now be done.”

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House Committee Blocks Sheep Station Closure

2014/07/16

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson applauded the decision to stop USDA’s planned closure of the U.S. Sheep Experimental Station in Dubois, Idaho.  Simpson, who is working with other western representatives to prevent closure of the facility, recently urged the chairman of the House Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee to deny a request by the Agricultural Research Service to reprogram funds from the sheep station, which would result in its closure.  Simpson was pleased to learn that the request has been denied.

“Because of its location and expertise, experts at the Sheep Experimental Station Dubois are conducting research that no other facility is currently able to do, including unique research on the domestic-wildlife interface that is vital to the future of the sheep industry,” said Simpson.  “Closing down the Dubois station would effectively end this important research, and it would be a huge loss to American agriculture, which is why my western colleagues and I are fighting so hard to keep it open.”

 Last week Congressman Simpson also sent a letter to Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, expressing disappointment that neither the USDA nor ARS notified Congress of their intent to close the Dubois center.  In the letter, Simpson and other western Members of Congress expressed concern that neither agency has explained how research currently underway in Dubois would be continued.  

“I’m pleased that we have avoided shutting down the Dubois center for now, but I recognize that this decision does not eliminate the potential threat of future closure of the U.S. Sheep Experimental Station,” Simpson said.  “I will continue to work with the USDA, University of Idaho, and members of the sheep industry to ensure the long-term viability of the sheep center at Dubois.  It is critical that the sheep industry have a voice in future USDA decisions affecting their economic vitality.”

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Simpson Defends Western Priorities to Appropriations Committee

2014/07/15

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson today defended western priorities in the House Interior and Environment Appropriations bill for Fiscal Year 2015.  Simpson, a member of the subcommittee, authored a number of provisions that were included in the bill, including language delaying the decision to list the sage-grouse as an endangered species by one year.  Simpson successfully fought off efforts to strike this language during full committee consideration today.

“What we’re trying to say [with this language] is to give us the time to do the work that is necessary [to prevent the need for a listing].” Simpson said during the markup.  “States like Idaho have been working diligently with the BLM and the Fish and Wildlife Service to develop a plan to preserve sage-grouse habitat.  Do you know what the biggest threat to it is?  Wildfire.  Do you know what one of the things is that prevents those rangeland fires from spreading?  Grazing.  So there are some conflicts that go on here, and…the states and the federal government together are working hard to develop state management plans that [they can both] support.  They just need the time to do it.”

This is complicated, and the states and the federal government are working together to find plans they can both support—they just need the time to do it.”

After the markup was complete, Simpson added, “A decision to list sage-grouse as an endangered species would have wide-reaching and devastating impacts on states like Idaho, and even stakeholders who have been at the table since the beginning of this process, like those in Idaho, are concerned that the court-imposed listing deadline has resulted in less collaboration and rushed decisions.  They have acknowledged to me that they need more time to do the good work that will prevent a listing.  This is why I once again authored a one-year delay in this bill.”

The bill also reflected Simpson’s influence in a number of other provisions, including full funding of wildfire suppression at the 10-year average, provisions improving the grazing permit process, and language prohibited the EPA from implementing controversial regulations over U.S. waters.  The bill was voted out of committee this afternoon.

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House Passes Energy & Water Appropriations Bill

2014/07/10

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson announced that the Fiscal Year 2015 Energy and Water Development Appropriations which passed the House of Representatives this evening, increases funding for critical programs at the Idaho National Laboratory. Simpson is Chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, and had the lead role in deciding funding for all Department of Energy programs.

“I am pleased to report that the Energy and Water bill increases funding for many of the vital research efforts at INL,” said Subcommittee Chairman Mike Simpson. “We’ve worked very hard with the Lab and the people of Eastern Idaho to promote INL, its mission, and its vital workforce as keys to a strong nuclear future here in the U.S. and across the globe. The funding increases contained in the bill will have a lasting impact on enhancing the current capabilities of the Lab and building new, unique capabilities that are essential to a vibrant national laboratory. This bill sends a strong message that INL’s work as the DOE’s lead nuclear energy laboratory is critical to our nation’s energy security.”

The FY 2015 Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill sets funding for the DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy, and the report which accompanied the bill laid out the following funding levels for nuclear energy research and development programs:

  • The Idaho Facilities Management account, which covers infrastructure maintenance and improvement at Idaho National Laboratory, is funded at $206 million – a $20million increase over the President’s request and $9.4 million above last year.

  • Idaho National Laboratory’s Safeguards and Security Program is funded at $104 million – an increase of $10 million over fiscal year 2014.

  • The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies program is funded at $101 million – an increase of nearly $30 million above fiscal year 2014 and $22.8 million above the President’s request.  Increases under this program are directed to fully complete the installation of post-irradiation examination equipment at INL’s Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  • Small Modular Reactor Licensing Support Programs are funded at $54.5 million. This funding is slated for NuScale Power’s Small Modular Reactor which is proposed for construction in Idaho.

  • The Light Water Reactor Sustainability program, which is managed by INL and promotes the continued safe operation of America’s existing nuclear reactors, is funded at $35million, an increase of $5 million over FY2014 and the budget request.

  • The Reactor Concepts Research, Development, and Demonstration account is funded at $138 million – an increase of $25 million above fiscal year 2014 and $37.5 million above the President’s request. Within the overall $138 million level for this account, $33 million is allocated to fuel qualification for the High Temperature Gas Reactor, $11 million above the budget request.

  • Fuel Cycle Research and Development is funded at $182 million, $4.5 million below fiscal year 2014 and $7 million below the budget request. Within the fuel cycle program, the Advanced Fuels program is funded at $60.1 million, the same as last year and $17 million above the budget request, and Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition research and development is funded at $55 million, $25 million above fiscal year 2014 and $6 million above the budget request.

  • Within the Office of Naval Reactors, the bill includes $68 million for the operation of the Advanced Test Reactor, an increase of $1.5 million above fiscal year 2014.

  • Within the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, the bill includes $5 million for the development of an Electric Grid Test Bed program to enhance existing full-scale electric grid testing capabilities like those at Idaho National Laboratory.

The bill also provides $380 million for cleanup activities associated with the Idaho Cleanup Project and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project co-located on the Idaho desert with Idaho National Laboratory.  The funding level of $380 million is an increase of $13 million above the President’s request and allows the significant cleanup activities currently underway to continue. The bill also includes an additional $2 million for the National Spent Fuel Program, putting the unique expertise of INL to work in order to provide solutions for managing the Department of Energy’s inventories of spent nuclear fuel.  Finally, $10 million is provided separately for security improvements of spent fuel storage at Fort St. Vrain, Colorado, which is managed by INL. Separate funding will ensure these needs do not impact the progress of ongoing cleanup activities in Idaho.  

 Despite the Obama Administration’s unilateral decision to disregard the federal government’s legal requirement to take responsibility for civilian spent nuclear fuel, the bill continues Nuclear Regulatory Commission funding for a nuclear waste storage facility at Yucca Mountain and to support the continued adjudication of the Yucca Mountain license application. .

Overall, the Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill provides $34 billion for the functions of the Department of Energy, the Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation and a number of independent agencies, including direction for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration.

“The Energy and Water Development bill touches virtually every American in some way and is critical to our nation’s energy and national security,” said Chairman Simpson. "This bill reflects the tough decisions necessitated by our challenging fiscal environment, while placing emphasis where it is needed most: meeting critical national security needs and investing in our nation's infrastructure. It prioritizes the maintenance and safety of our nuclear weapons stockpile, while also funding important infrastructure projects and research that will increase U.S. economic competitiveness and growth."  

The bill passed the House by a vote of 253-170, and will next be conferenced with the Senate version of the same bill. The complete Committee Report can be found at:  http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-113-hr-fy2015-energywater.pdf  

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Simpson Champions Idaho Priorities in House Interior Appropriations Bill

2014/07/09

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson today supported the House Interior and Environment Appropriations bill for FY15 during subcommittee consideration.  The bill takes significant steps to protect western interests and reflects Simpson’s influence as a member of the subcommittee.  Among Simpson’s priorities included in the bill is full funding for Payment in Lieu of Taxes, a vital program in the west that ensures communities are adequately compensated for the lack of tax revenue due to the presence of federal land.

“Every county in Idaho depends on the federal government meeting its obligations through Payments in Lieu of Taxes,” said Simpson.  “PILT is essentially the government’s property tax on the federal land it owns, and it needs to be paid in full and on time.  I’m pleased that full funding was included in the Interior bill for FY15.  I am also committed to fulfilling the promises made to public lands counties in the long-term and will continue working to provide permanent certainty for Idaho’s counties.”

The bill also fully funds wildfire suppression at the 10-year average, an increase of $149 million over last year’s levels.  During the subcommittee markup, Simpson continued to advocate for fixing the flaws in the process of budgeting for wildfire suppression.  Simpson’s separate legislation to end the destructive practice of fire borrowing by treating catastrophic wildfires like similar natural disasters has over 100 cosponsors, including every member of the subcommittee.  “We’ve got to [pass this bill] if we want to reduce the costs of wildfires in the future,” he said during the markup.  “It doesn’t make sense to continue robbing from programs that remove hazardous fuels in order to pay for wildfire suppression.  Hopefully we will be able to get this through Congress this year.”

The Interior bill also includes a number of provisions championed by Simpson that benefit Idaho, including:

-Language preventing the EPA from dramatically expanding its jurisdiction over state and local water under the Clean Water Act;

-Permanent extension of language that allows agencies to renew grazing permits while environmental work is completed;

-Language delaying the court-imposed deadline for determining whether to list sage-grouse as an endangered species for one year to enable states and federal agencies to complete work on sage-grouse management plans.

-Language prohibiting the EPA from moving forward with economically harmful proposals to regulate greenhouse gases from stationary sources.

The bill, which was voice voted out of subcommittee, now moves to full committee consideration.

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Simpson and Walden Move to Stop Closure of Idaho Sheep Research Station

2014/06/27

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson, Oregon Congressman Greg Walden, and other western members of Congress have asked the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture to stop the closure of the U.S. Sheep Experimental Station in Dubois, Idaho.   In a letter, the members ask that Subcommittee Chairman Robert Aderholt not approve the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) request for reprogramming of funds from the sheep station in Dubois.  Reprogramming of funds would result in closure of the facility.

"We were disappointed to learn that ARS has plans to close the US. Sheep Experimental Station in Dubois and frustrated that ARS did not notify Congress or the sheep industry until the decision had been made," Congressman Simpson said.  "In our letter to Chairman Aderholt, we explain that closure of the Dubois Sheep Experiment Station would have a substantial impact on the western sheep industry and express our concern that people involved in the industry were not consulted before ARS made this decision."

"I was shocked to learn that the USDA is attempting to close the Dubois Sheep Experiment Station without consulting western farmers and ranchers or having a plan to ensure the station's important research continues,”  Congressman Walden said.  “No other station conducts research into the unique challenges that confront sheep producers in Oregon and across the west, like grazing techniques, diseases, or developing new breeds.  That's why we are working hard with other western representatives to keep this station open so this innovative ag research can continue.
 
Congressman Simpson and Congressman Walden state in the letter that the ARS sheep center at Dubois conducts critical research on the interaction between domestic and bighorn sheep, and that “it would be difficult, if not impossible, for this research to continue if the Dubois center was closed.”

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Simpson Supports Bills to Create Jobs, Increase Energy Independence

2014/06/26

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson this week supported legislation that will lower energy costs and promote U.S. energy independence.  H.R. 3301, the North American Energy Infrastructure Act, eliminates the requirement that oil and gas pipelines and electric transmission lines that cross U.S. borders with Mexico or Canada obtain a Presidential Permit in order to begin such projects.  H.R. 6, the Domestic Prosperity and Global Freedom Act, would set a timeframe for the Energy Department to review applications for liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports and to require applicants, as a condition of approval, to publicly disclose the specific export destinations of such LNG exports.  H.R. 4899, the Lowering Gasoline Prices to Fuel an America That Works Act of 2014, would require at least 25 percent of eligible federal land be made available annually to lease for oil and gas exploration. 

“Lowering the price Americans pay at the pump and achieving energy independence will lead to a stronger economy and increase our national security,” said Simpson.  “Since the Obama Administration took office, they have offered more roadblocks than solutions toward these goals.  For example, although our country still heavily relies on imported oil, the Obama Administration continues to block and delay permits for increased domestic energy production on our public lands as well as for job creating oil and gas pipeline projects and increasing LNG exports.  These bills will help get us back on the right track.”   

H.R. 3301, H.R. 6, and H.R. 4899 passed the House with bi-partisan support, and will now move on to consideration in the U.S. Senate. 

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Simpson’s Newborn Screening Bill Passes House

2014/06/25

The House of Representatives has passed H.R. 1281, the Newborn Screening Saves Lives Reauthorization Act, co-authored by Congressman Mike Simpson and Congresswoman Lucile Roybal-Allard (CA).  The bill would reauthorize programs for five years while updating and building upon the landmark 2008 Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act first offered by Simpson and Roybal-Allard.

“I am so pleased to see the House take up and pass the bipartisan Newborn Screening Saves Lives Reauthorization Act, and I am so grateful to Congresswoman Roybal-Allard for her dedication to this issue.  She has truly led the way in making this bill a reality,” said Congressman Simpson. “Though it doesn’t receive a lot of national media attention, it is as important as any bill we will pass this year. Screening detects conditions that are otherwise undetectable at birth and if left untreated can cause disability, developmental delay, illness, or even death.”

Congresswoman Roybal-Allard added, “Our collective efforts to rapidly identify and treat these disorders are making a difference between health and disability, and even life and death, for the children affected by these severe diseases.”

“Newborn screening allows us to save lives and prevent serious disability,” said March of Dimes President Dr. Jennifer L. Howse.  “Given that one in every 300 infants has a condition that can be detected through this screening, newborn screening represents an indispensable investment in health, families, and our economy.  The March of Dimes is deeply grateful to Representatives Roybal-Allard and Simpson for their steadfast leadership on this issue vital to newborn and their families.”

Newborn screening is run by individual states, but the original 2008 Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act first encouraged states to uniformly test for a recommended set of disorders, and provided resources for individual states to grow their own screening programs.   Before that legislation, state screening varied greatly, with only 10 states requiring infants to be screened for all the treatable “core conditions” recommended.  Today, most states require screening for at least 29 of the 31 core conditions.

The test consists of a simple prick on the heel of newborns before they leave the hospital.  That blood sample tests for serious genetic, metabolic, or hearing disorders that may not be apparent at birth.  Without the test, parents may have no way of knowing heir child needs treatment.

“Besides the obvious benefit to families who suffer an enormous emotional and economic burden when a one of these conditions goes undiagnosed for too long, this legislation is a powerful tool for savings in our already overburdened health care system,” added Simpson. “As a former dentist, I have seen the value of diagnosing and treating a condition early in a child’s life.”

One example is found in a 2012 study on severe combined immunodeficiency, known as SCID, which is one of the 31 core conditions recommended for state screening.  The Medicaid cost of treating a baby with SCID in the first two years can be $2 million dollars or more.  Yet an infant diagnosed early can be cured through a bone marrow transplant in the first three months of life, costing $100,000.

Similar legislation has already passed in the U.S. Senate, which will need to take up the House changes before sending it to the President for his signature.

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Defense Bill Passes House, Includes Amendment Supporting A-10

2014/06/20

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson praised the passage of the FY15 Defense Appropriations bill, which included an amendment offered by Representative Candice Miller (R-MI) to prohibit the Department of Defense from spending funds to divest, retire, transfer, or place in storage any A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft, or to remove any units of the active or reserve component associated with such aircraft. The Air Force has proposed to retire the A-10, and the House Defense Appropriations bill did not include funding for it in its FY15 bill. 

“I’m very pleased that my colleagues have shown wide recognition and support for the importance of keeping the A-10,” said Simpson.  “The A-10’s past combat performance is lauded by both the service members that operate them and those who rely on them for close air support on the battlefield. While I certainly acknowledge that the Air Force must make difficult decisions in this time of reduced budgets, the A-10’s low operating costs and unique capabilities merit our continued support until an appropriate replacement can be identified.”

The A-10s based at the headquarters for the Idaho National Guard at Gowen Field in Boise, Idaho, are essential to their mission. The Idaho Delegation has been working with Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter to preserve, extend and expand the mission of the Idaho National Guard. 

The Defense Appropriations bill passed by a vote of 340-73 and will next proceed to conference with the Senate version of the same bill.

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Simpson Boosts INL Funding in Energy Bill

2014/06/18

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson today announced that the Fiscal Year 2015 Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill reverses cuts to Idaho National Laboratory, the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, and cleanup activities in Idaho. Simpson is Chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, which passed the bill through the full House Appropriations Committee today, and had the lead role in deciding funding for all Department of Energy programs.

“I am pleased to report that the Energy and Water bill reverses cuts to nuclear research sought by the Obama Administration and increases funding for many of the vital research efforts at INL,” said Subcommittee Chairman Mike Simpson. “We’ve worked very hard with the Lab and the people of Eastern Idaho to promote INL, its mission, and its vital workforce as keys to a strong nuclear future here in the U.S. and across the globe. The funding increases contained in the bill will have a lasting impact on enhancing the current capabilities of the Lab and building new, unique capabilities that are essential to a vibrant national laboratory. This bill sends a strong message that INL’s work as the DOE’s lead nuclear energy laboratory is critical to our nation’s energy security.”

The FY 2015 Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill sets funding for the DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy at $899 million, including $104 million for Idaho National Laboratory Safeguards and Security.  The $899 million funding level represents an increase of $35.6 million over the President’s request and $10 million over the FY2014 funding level. Nuclear energy research and development programs that receive funding within the $899 million allocation include:

  • The Idaho Facilities Management account, which covers infrastructure maintenance and improvement at Idaho National Laboratory, is funded at $206 million – a $20 million increase over the President’s request and $9.4 million above last year.

  • Idaho National Laboratory’s Safeguards and Security Program is funded at $104 million – an increase of $10 million over fiscal year 2014.
  • The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies program is funded at $101 million – an increase of nearly $30 million above fiscal year 2014 and $22.8 million above the President’s request.  Increases under this program are directed to fully complete the installation of post-irradiation examination equipment at INL’s Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  • Small Modular Reactor Licensing Support Programs are funded at $54.5 million.   This funding is slated for NuScale Power’s Small Modular Reactor which is proposed for construction in Idaho.

  • The Light Water Reactor Sustainability program, which is managed by INL and promotes the continued safe operation of America’s existing nuclear reactors, is funded at $35 million, an increase of $5 million over FY2014 and the budget request.

  • The Reactor Concepts Research, Development, and Demonstration account is funded at $138 million – an increase of $25 million above fiscal year 2014 and $37.5 million above the President’s request. Within the overall $138 million level for this account, $33 million is allocated to fuel qualification for the High Temperature Gas Reactor, $11 million above the budget request.

  • Fuel Cycle Research and Development is funded at $182 million, $4.5 million below fiscal year 2014 and $7 million below the budget request. Within the fuel cycle program, the Advanced Fuels program is funded at $60.1 million, the same as last year and $17 million above the budget request, and Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition research and development is funded at $55 million, $25 million above fiscal year 2014 and $6 million above the budget request.

  • Within the Office of Naval Reactors, the bill includes $68 million for the operation of the Advanced Test Reactor, an increase of $1.5 million above fiscal year 2014.

  • Within the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, the bill includes $5 million for the development of an Electric Grid Test Bed program to enhance existing full-scale electric grid testing capabilities like those at Idaho National Laboratory. 

The bill also provides $380 million for cleanup activities associated with the Idaho Cleanup Project and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project co-located on the Idaho desert with Idaho National Laboratory.  The funding level of $380 million is an increase of $13 million above the President’s request and allows the significant cleanup activities currently underway to continue. The bill also includes an additional $2 million for the National Spent Fuel Program, putting the unique expertise of INL to work in order to provide solutions for managing the Department of Energy’s inventories of spent nuclear fuel.  Finally, $10 million is provided separately for security improvements of spent fuel storage at Fort St. Vrain, Colorado, which is managed by INL. Separate funding will ensure these needs do not impact the progress of ongoing cleanup activities in Idaho. 

Despite the Obama Administration’s unilateral decision to disregard the federal government’s legal requirement to take responsibility for civilian spent nuclear fuel, the bill continues Nuclear Regulatory Commission funding for a nuclear waste storage facility at Yucca Mountain and to support the continued adjudication of the Yucca Mountain license application.

Overall, the Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill provides $34 billion for the functions of the Department of Energy, the Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation and a number of independent agencies, including direction for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration.

“The Energy and Water Development bill touches virtually every American in some way and is critical to our nation’s energy and national security,” said Chairman Simpson. "This bill reflects the tough decisions necessitated by our challenging fiscal environment, while placing emphasis where it is needed most: meeting critical national security needs and investing in our nation's infrastructure. It prioritizes the maintenance and safety of our nuclear weapons stockpile, while also funding important infrastructure projects and research that will increase U.S. economic competitiveness and growth." 

The bill is expected to be considered on the floor of the House of Representatives in the coming weeks. The complete Committee Report can be found at:  http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-113-hr-fy2015-energywater.pdf

To view Congressman Mike Simpson’s opening statement visit his YouTube page.

 

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Contact Information

2312 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-5531
Fax 202-225-8216
www.house.gov/simpson

Committee Assignments

Appropriations

Michael (Mike) K. Simpson is serving his eighth term in the House of Representatives for Idaho’s Second Congressional District.

Mike serves on the House Appropriations Committee. He is the Chairman for the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. He also serves on the Interior and Environment Subcommittee and the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee. These committees have jurisdiction over funding for a number of programs critical to Idaho, including the Department of Energy, the Department of the Interior, the Forest Service, our National Parks, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Smithsonian Institute.

Simpson is one of the House’s leading advocates for a new energy policy and a renewed commitment to research and development of improved nuclear energy technologies. Mike has also gained national attention for his bill to split the massive, overburdened 9th Circuit Court of Appeals as well as his bill, the Central Idaho Economic Development and Recreation Act which addresses the concerns of economic growth and stability for rural Idaho and resolves long time wilderness debate over the Boulder-White Clouds.

His political career began in 1980, when he was elected to the Blackfoot City Council. In 1984, he was elected to the Idaho Legislature where he served until 1998, the last six years serving as Speaker. Simpson was born in Burley, Idaho and raised in Blackfoot. He graduated from Utah State University and earned his DMD from Washington University School of Dental Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. After graduation, he joined his father and uncle at the Simpson Family Dental Practice in Blackfoot.

Mike is an avid golfer and enjoys painting. He has been married to his wife Kathy for over 40 years and they live in Idaho Falls.


Serving With

Raul Labrador

IDAHO's 1st DISTRICT

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