Mike Coffman

Mike Coffman

COLORADO's 6th DISTRICT

Coffman Statement on JASTA Veto Override

2016/09/28

Washington, DC -- U.S. Representative Mike Coffman (CO-06) today issued the following statement on the veto override of S. 2040, the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act  (JASTA):

“Today Congress stood steadfast in seeking justice for the victims of terrorist attacks on U.S. soil and their families. We, as a country, cannot allow foreign governments, who support terrorism, to escape responsibility for their complicit hand in terrorist attacks on U.S. soil.”

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Coffman Calls for Criminal Referrals Following VA OIG Report Release

2016/09/22

Washington, DC -- U.S. Representative Mike Coffman (R-Aurora) today wrote a letter to the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General (VAOIG) regarding criminal referrals following the release of the VAOIG Report on the Denver replacement medical center in Aurora, Colorado.

Coffman’s full letter can be read here.

VAOIG’s full report titled, Review of the Replacement of the Denver Medical Center, Eastern Colorado Health Care System can be read here.

“I am writing to follow-up on the April 6, 2016 letter Representative Kathleen Rice and I sent your predecessor requesting a review by the Depart of Veterans Affairs Office of the Inspector General (VAOIG) to determine whether any criminal referrals are appropriate with regards to the hospital debacle in Aurora, Colorado…I am disappointed that VAOIG’s review of the Aurora construction project released earlier today does not address the matter of criminal referrals,” Coffman says in the letter.

“After reviewing the report, I was particularly struck by your office’s conclusions concerning the congressional testimony of former VA executive Glenn Haggstrom.  After recounting numerous internal warnings Haggstrom received about the cost-escalation in Aurora, as well as Haggstrom’s testimony before Congress in May 2013 and April 2014, VAOIG generously concluded Haggstrom ‘did not share [the] information with Congress.’” 

“A less generous assessment is that Haggstrom intentionally misled Congress – he lied.  As the report details, Haggstrom was a party to extensive internal communications concerning the likely need for significant additional funding for the project.”

“I believe the Department and its various congressional witnesses knowingly painted an inaccurate picture of the Aurora project in its representations to Congress in an effort to avoid criticism, embarrassment, and ultimately, accountability,” Coffman continued.

Coffman goes on to insist a review of the VAOIG report to address “whether criminal referrals to the Department of Justice for any VA officials are appropriate… If you conclude that no criminal referrals are appropriate, please clearly explain why.”

A Marine Corps combat veteran, Coffman serves on the House Armed Services Committee and House Veteran’s Affairs Committee, where he is the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

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Advocates, lawmakers push for answers to problem of 'bad paper' discharges

2016/09/13

Veterans advocates rallied on Capitol Hill Tuesday to urge lawmakers deal with the problem of so-called “bad paper” discharges that prevent some struggling veterans from receiving health care, and urged the White House to intervene while the legislative process drags on. 

“It’s disturbing to see this issue come back,” said John Rowan, president and CEO of Vietnam Veterans of America. “We saw half a million questionable less-than-honorable discharges during the Vietnam era. And to think that today there are as many as 300,000 more since Sept. 11, that’s a disgrace.”

Senate lawmakers have already included legislation in the annual defense authorization bill to require the Defense Department to review and improve the discharge process after numerous reports of troops being forced out of the ranks without veterans benefits due to infractions like suicide attempts and substance abuse related to post-traumatic stress disorder. 

Tuesday’s rally was designed to encourage more lawmakers to push to keep that language in the final policy bill draft, adopting changes that would provide mental health care to nearly everyone who served in the military and ensuring that review boards see all relevant health information when deciding whether to grant or upgrade less-than-honorable discharges. 

Measure sponsor Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., said he sees more than enough support in each chamber for the proposal, but also supports executive action to enact some provisions of the legislation immediately. 

“The thing is just to get something done,” he said. “Let’s get these folks the help they have earned and deserve.”

 

Advocates have been hopeful that President Obama might intervene on the issue for years, since he sponsored legislation on mistaken and fraudulent military discharges during his time in the Senate. 

But White House officials have thus far been silent on the issue. Meanwhile, negotiations on the annual defense authorization bill have stalled on unrelated issues. Supporters called that frustrating. 

“We see the suicide rate for veterans today. Why would we deny any of them mental health care?” said Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., an Iraq War veteran and member of the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee. 

Tyson Manker, an Illinois attorney who also served in Iraq, said too many veterans are struggling after being “thrown away like a piece of garbage” by the military. He was other-than-honorably discharged by the Marine Corps after trying marijuana to help control his PTSD episodes. 

“It’s time for us to stand and demand justice,” he said. 

Advocates want Obama to sign an executive order by Veterans’ Day stopping misconduct charges for sexual assault survivors in the ranks, granting tentative health care eligibility to all veterans before reviewing their discharge status, and easing hardship waivers for troops being dismissed for some infractions. 

Peters said lawmakers can codify those changes as permanent once the legislative process concludes. 

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Congress right to press VA on Aurora hospital

2016/09/13

Taxpayers in Colorado and across the nation have been kept in the dark far too long about what went so disastrously awry with the mushrooming cost to build the still-under-construction veterans hospital in Aurora.

One would think a billion-dollar overrun for a facility originally slated to cost $604 million would demand a timely explanation. But as we saw again last week, the top brass at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs keeps trying to keep its secrets. Though the VA completed a report on the matter more than a year ago, it has declined to make its findings public. What’s more, the VA has kept information from congressional oversight.

We’re pleased that members of the U.S. House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs have taken action meant to free up that information. Last week, the committee voted to compel VA officials to make available detailed records from the department’s internal investigation into the eye-popping overrun.

After officials announced last year that the cost of the hospital had jumped to $1.7 billion, an investigation by The Denver Post found several reasons to help explain the overruns. Chief among them were mismanagement within the VA and lax oversight.

But VA officials presumably had far more access to those involved in the Aurora project. In fact, they collected thousands of pages of interviews and other investigative documents that could help objective reviewers study the billion-dollar mishap. Congressional members have been right to ask for that information, but so far have received only 33 pages of summary information about the contents of those files.

That’s just an astonishing fact. After overseeing what once was called the biggest construction failure in VA history, and conducting a massive investigation that might explain how to prevent future boondoggles, the only accounting to date is a slim summary that only members of a congressional committee are able to view.

As committee member Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., said it: “If the department’s effort to hide problems in Aurora sound bad, the department’s efforts to avoid subsequent accountability have been worse.”

The VA has argued that if it provides a full account with the investigative records attached, the fallout could imperil future fact-finding efforts; it makes that claim arguing that the supplemental records contain confidential information. While it is only responsible to expect that innocent employees be protected, VA officials surely could have found ways to redact identities and protect those employees.

Members of the congressional committee now seeking the records through subpoena make exactly that point. They say they have no intention of making public confidential or personal information.

To their credit, VA officials have said they comply with the committee’s request. Committee members need to hold them to it.

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Olympic runner yearns for peace, fears bloodletting in Ethiopia

2016/09/13

Washington (AFP) - Ethiopia faces potential tragedy -- even ethnic bloodletting -- if the international community looks away from repression there, runner Feyisa Lilesa warned Tuesday.

"We all yearn for peace, but the government continues its attacks. I fear that if the killing does not stop, people could abandon nonviolence in self-defense," Lilesa said in an op-ed in The Washington Post.

The marathon man made headlines during the Rio Olympics last month when he made a protest signal as he claimed silver in the men's marathon.

The gesture -- crossing his wrists, arms raised above his head -- is a symbol of defiance against the Ethiopian government's crackdown on anti-government protests that started in his home region, Oromo, in November last year.

The defiant gesture is said to represent the handcuffed arms of political prisoners and dissidents in his home country.

- Ethnic strains real: runner -

"That country is now operating around a system where elites from only one ethnicity are respected and considered superior," he explained.

Human Rights Watch estimates the Ethiopian security forces have killed more than 400 people involved in the protests.

"This includes at least 12 people that I know from my home district of Jaldu in Oromia," Lilesa wrote in The Post.

His is one of the country's several regions with minority ethnic groups.

The runner made the gesture twice -- once while crossing the finish line and again on the medal podium. He said he feared his life would be in peril if he returned home.

"Running is my life," he said, and "I don't think that they (Ethiopia) will select me again."

Ethiopian authorities assured him he would not be punished, but he nevertheless skipped the Olympic team's flight home. Reports have suggested he may seek political asylum in the United States.

And the United States, the 28-year-old runner said, can press Addis Ababa on human rights.

"Hundreds of my fellow Ethiopians have been killed by security forces only because they peacefully protested against injustice... I want to tell the world what is happening," said Lilesa, who said he fears he will be killed if he returns home.

Regarded as one of Africa's most repressive states, Ethiopia is struggling to contain the rare anti-government unrest unleashed by the protest movement, which has spread from Oromo in the center of the country to Amhara in the north.

Lilesa said he would ask the US government to demand an explanation from Ethiopia and to condemn its actions.

- US lawmakers take note -

New Jersey lawmaker Chris Smith and Colorado's Mike Coffman voiced concern about "the oppressive actions taken by the government of President Mulatu Teshome," in a statement.

"Unfortunately... moderation has not taken place -- if anything, the actions of the government of Ethiopia have intensified in its effort to shut down political opposition and critics in civil society," the US lawmakers said.

Anthropologist and Ethiopia expert Bonnie Holcomb said the importance of the minority group's connections to their traditional lands cannot be understated.

"The land is their umbilicus. It is their lifeline, they are part of the land, there is not a separation between human beings and the land," she told AFP.

"So when you take them off, they have nowhere," she said.

"Their identity is struck at the heart, so (these demonstrations are) an expression of desperation."

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Congress is painfully close to passing mental health reform

2016/09/10

One of the best attempts to improve America’s mental health crisis in decades will stall if the U.S. Senate does not get its act together before it goes on another month-long break.  Freshly back from vacation, senators should pass Rep. Tim Murphy’s Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act.

Murphy, a Republican from Pennsylvania and a clinical psychologist, has seen firsthand the challenges that people with mental health disorders face. Social stigma and inadequate public support for treatment leave them with few options.

The Affordable Care Act, for all its flaws, got it right when it mandated mental health parity. Providers and insurers are supposed to treat illnesses of the mind on par with illnesses of the body. A health issue is a health issue.

Murphy’s bill originated in the aftermath of the 2012 Newtown, Conn., mass shooting. It just took this long for a compromise bill to advance in a divided Congress.

More than 11 million adults suffer from a mental illness, and almost half of them do not seek treatment or cannot find it. For some, friends and families fill the void. But the lives of too many others fall apart. They lose jobs and end up living on the streets, or they suffer in secret until something snaps and they harm themselves or others.

That last group is far too familiar to Coloradans. Our state has witnessed mentally troubled mass killers more than most, and our suicide rate is one of the highest in the country.

Murphy recently told The Denver Post editorial board about conversations he’s had with leaders in cities across the country: “They always say, as we’ve emptied our asylums — which we needed to — this is where we’ve now placed mentally ill people: prisons, homeless on the streets, tied to a bed in an emergency room or the county morgue.”

His bill would increase psychiatric bed space so that people have a place to receive evidence-based care. It also would create a federal assistant secretary to oversee mental health policies. That person could provide missing coordination of programs and funding that span multiple agencies.

Other elements of the bill include a grant program for suicide prevention and expanded Medicaid benefits for youth who receive inpatient care. It relies on states to implement best practices for their residents with support, not mandates, from Washington.

The bill sailed through the House with overwhelming bipartisan support. Colorado Reps. Mike Coffman and Scott Tipton were both cosponsors.

Its prospects in the Senate are murky. Colorado Sens. Cory Gardner and Michael Bennet have both supported mental health reform in the past. Indeed, there is bipartisan support for this bill.

However, Texas Sen. John Cornyn wants to use mental health legislation to push gun rights. Democrats, of course, won’t support that and would filibuster a bill that they otherwise support.

Whether one supports or opposes loosening access to guns, surely most people agree that a mental health bill is not the proper vehicle. Congress is tantalizingly close to accomplishing something that will address the nation’s deplorable treatment of the mentally ill. It should not fall victim to the hyperpartisan gun debate.

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Coffman Votes to Subpoena Internal VA Probe on Aurora VA Hospital Project

2016/09/07

Washington, DC -- U.S. Representative Mike Coffman (CO-06) today voted in favor of the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee’s (HVAC) motion to subpoena thousands of pages of undisclosed supporting documentation from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Administrative Investigation Board (AIB) report detailing the Aurora VA hospital construction debacle.  

The subpoena, which HVAC agreed to by a voice vote, will legally compel the VA to hand over all of the AIB’s supporting documentation to HVAC.  

“Today is a win for taxpayers and veterans alike,” said Coffman, Chairman of the House Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations. “This subpoena will finally force VA to disclose the thousands of pages of supporting documentation linked to the VA’s own internal investigation – something that the VA has continually refused to do over the past year. Congress has exercised its Constitutional authority to hold the VA accountable for its actions in the Aurora VA hospital debacle. Veterans and the American people deserve answers on what drove over $1 billion in cost overruns and years of delay in its completion.”

HVAC’s subpoena follows a long history of corruption and bureaucratic incompetence at the VA.

When construction began on the Aurora VA hospital project in August 2009, the VA estimated the facility cost at just under $583 million with a February 2014 completion date.

Years later, the Aurora VA hospital project has since spiraled to cost $1.67 billion and is now estimated to be completed in early 2018.

Despite VA’s failures, no official was fired or disciplined for actions that sent the Aurora VA project into an over-budget and behind-schedule debacle. 

Nearly a year after it was initially promised for delivery, a memorandum summarizing the VA’s AIB findings was finally provided to HVAC Chairman Miller in March, but the VA will not release to HVAC or the American people the thousands of pages of supporting documentation that accompany the memo.

In March 2015, the VA appointed the AIB to conduct an investigation into the massive cost overruns and delays which occurred at the site. As early as June 2015, VA Deputy Secretary Sloan Gibson indicated that the AIB was close to completion and assured HVAC members on December 9, 2015 that the VA would provide the AIB “relatively soon.”

On October 9, 2015, Coffman along with Ranking Member Ann Kuster (D-NH), sent a letter formally requesting that the AIB report be released no later than October 23, 2015. Secretary McDonald ignored Coffman and Kuster’s request to release the AIB report.

On March 25, 2016, Coffman sent an additional letter to VA Secretary McDonald asking the VA to publically release the AIB no later than April 6, 2016.

“I insist that you make this document available to other members of Congress and the American people,” Coffman said in his March 25th letter to Secretary McDonald. “American taxpayers and veterans are entitled to VA’s detailed explanation as to how the costs of this project spiraled out-of-control seemingly overnight.”

Coffman’s request resulted in the VA providing a redacted 31-page summary memorandum which allegedly included “information protected from disclosure” because it “…may be protected under the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. Section 552a.”

In one VA response to Coffman’s numerous requests, the VA also claimed that it had released “thousands of pages of documentation from the AIB” to “all four VA Congressional Oversight Committees.”

“That statement is patently false,” Coffman said in a September 2nd statement. “The VA, to date, has not provided any AIB supporting documentation to either HVAC or the American people. VA officials, unsurprisingly, continue to dodge Committee oversight requests.”

Most recently, on July 7, 2016, Coffman penned a letter to Secretary McDonald demanding the “thousands of pages of documentation from the AIB,” as well as a complete legal explanation as to why the 31-page redacted memo provided to HVAC is allegedly protected under the Privacy Act, no later than August 31, 2016.

The VA did not comply with the August 31st deadline, resulting in HVAC’s motion to subpoena.

Coffman has been a leader in reforming VA hospital construction practices.  Coffman’s reforms stripped the VA of their construction management authority following years of delays and over $1 billion in cost overruns at the Aurora VA hospital. The Army Corps of Engineers has now taken over the Aurora VA hospital construction following Coffman’s reforms.

A Marine Corps combat veteran, Coffman serves on the House Armed Services Committee and House Veteran’s Affairs Committee, where he is the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations.

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House Panel Subpoenas VA Over Denver Hospital, Artwork

2016/09/07

Demanding explanations for a $1 billion cost overrun, a House panel Wednesday issued a subpoena to the Department of Veterans Affairs for documents on how the cost of a Denver-area VA hospital ballooned to almost $1.7 billion.

That figure was nearly triple earlier estimates.

The subpoena by the House Veterans Affairs Committee also seeks documents related to millions of dollars spent on artwork and ornamental furnishings at VA offices nationwide, including more than $6.4 million spent on the Palo Alto, California, health care system.

The chairman of the veterans panel, Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Fla., said it was "unfortunate that VA's continued lack of transparency has led us to this decision" to issue the subpoena, but contended that lawmakers had little choice.

"We will not accept VA trying to pull the wool over the eyes of this committee and the American people for poor decision-making and waste of funds," Miller said.

The subpoena was served Wednesday and gives the VA until Sept. 28 to respond.

The subpoena is at least the fourth the House panel has issued since 2014 amid continuing frustration over the VA's performance following the wait-time scandal that led to the ouster of the VA secretary and a $16 billion overhaul approved by Congress.

Veterans on secret waiting lists faced scheduling delays of up to a year, and as many as 40 veterans died while awaiting care at the Phoenix hospital, according to an investigation by the VA's inspector general.

Miller and other Republicans say the VA has been slow to fix problems and should have fired some employees for wrongdoing.

The GOP-led panel approved Wednesday's subpoena by voice vote. Democrats objected, saying they worried that documents related to the Aurora, Colorado, hospital could jeopardize agency whistleblowers who have helped officials learn the true scope of the cost overruns at the facility, considered one of the biggest boondoggles in the agency's history.

Miller and other Republicans said the committee has a track record of protecting whistleblowers and the subpoena will not lead to the release of personally identifiable information.

The committee has been seeking documents related to the Denver hospital for months. The VA gave Congress a summary of an internal inquiry, but not the supporting documents, despite repeated requests from lawmakers.

The summary hasn't been made public, and the VA has not complied with an open records request from The Associated Press to release it. Deputy VA Secretary Sloan Gibson has said making the documents public could have a chilling effect on future internal investigations.

The summary, in conjunction with the other information provided to lawmakers should "provide sufficient information to inform the committee about how the (investigation) was conducted, the reasons for its conclusions and rationale for corrective actions that the department has taken to ensure that there is no repeat of the missteps made on this project," Gibson said in an Aug. 19 letter to Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo.

Coffman, whose suburban Denver district includes Aurora, is in a tough re-election race. "Veterans and the American people deserve answers on what drove over $1 billion in cost overruns and years of delay" in completing the hospital, he said.

Panel chairman Miller said he has been seeking documents related to art contracts for more than year, following reports that the VA's Palo Alto Health Care System spent more than $6.4 million on artwork and other furnishings, including two sculptures that cost nearly $500,000.

The subpoena seeks information on purchases of artwork and ornamental furnishings nationwide since 2010.

VA spokeswoman Walinda West said in a statement that while department officials "must be stewards of taxpayer dollars, we also know that providing comprehensive health care for patients goes beyond just offering the most advanced medical treatments. Artwork is one of the many facets that create a healing environment for our nation's veterans."

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House Committee Subpoenas VA Over Hospital

2016/09/07

A House panel voted to subpoena the Department of Veterans Affairs on Wednesday. The Veterans Affairs Committee wants thousands of pages of documents related to the cost of constructing the VA Hospital in Aurora.

The committee also wants documents related to art and ornamental furnishing purchases for the past five-and-a-half years.

The cost of building the hospital on the Anschutz Medical Campus has ballooned to more than $1.6 billion. That figure was nearly triple earlier estimates.

The hospital is in Rep. Mike Coffman’s district. Coffman is a Republican representing Colorado in Congress. He made the case to take the step of subpoenaing the VA to the committee.

“I believe this committee and the American people are entitled to reviewall the documents relating to the Aurora AIB and to draw their own conclusions as to what went wrong and who should be held accountable as far as this project is concerned,” said Coffman.

Coffman said the VA has blamed the cost overruns on officials who are no longer with the department.

Democrats and the VA objected to the subpoena because they worried that documents related to the hospital could jeopardize agency whistleblowers who have helped officials learn the true scope of the cost overruns at the facility, considered one of the biggest boondoggles in the agency’s history.

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BREAKING: Coffman to Vote on AIB Subpoena Next Week

2016/09/02

Washington, DC -- U.S. Representative Mike Coffman (CO-06), Chairman of the House Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, will vote in support of full committee Chairman Jeff Miller’s (FL-01) motion to subpoena the thousands of pages of undisclosed supporting documentation from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Administrative Investigation Board (AIB) report detailing the Aurora VA hospital construction debacle.  

Nearly a year after it was initially promised for delivery, a memorandum summarizing the VA’s AIB findings was finally provided to House Veterans’ Affairs Committee (HVAC) Chairman Miller in March, but the VA will not release to HVAC or the American people the thousands of pages of supporting documentation that accompany the memo.

“The American people deserve to know exactly what happened to drive over $1 billion in cost overruns on a project that was not supposed to cost much more than $600 million,” Coffman said.

The subpoena, which the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee (HVAC) is scheduled to vote on September 7, 2016, will legally compel the VA to hand over all of the AIB’s supporting documentation to HVAC.  

“Since the VA has rejected numerous formal requests, the committee must vote to issue a subpoena,” Coffman said. “The VA’s own conclusions in the summary memo essentially place all the blame on individuals who have conveniently now retired. This is unsurprising considering the VA has consistently refused to hold anyone accountable for the many failures on this project. I suspect the American people and their Congressional Representatives will draw very different conclusions when they can see the supporting documentation that HVAC intends to subpoena next week.”

The subpoena follows a long history of formal requests made by Coffman for the AIB supporting documentation.  

On October 9, 2015, Coffman along with Ranking Member Ann Kuster (D-NH), sent a letter formally requesting that the AIB report be released no later than October 23, 2015. Secretary McDonald ignored Coffman and Kuster’s request to release the AIB report.

On March 25, 2016, Coffman sent an additional letter to VA Secretary McDonald asking the VA to publically release the AIB no later than April 6, 2016.

“I insist that you make this document available to other members of Congress and the American people,” Coffman said in his March 25th letter to Secretary McDonald. “American taxpayers and veterans are entitled to VA’s detailed explanation as to how the costs of this project spiraled out-of-control seemingly overnight.”

Coffman’s request resulted in the VA providing a redacted 31-page summary memorandum which allegedly included “information protected from disclosure” because it “…may be protected under the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. Section 552a.”

In one VA response to Coffman’s numerous requests, the VA also claimed that it had released “thousands of pages of documentation from the AIB” to “all four VA Congressional Oversight Committees.”

“That statement is patently false,” Coffman said. “The VA, to date, has not provided any AIB supporting documentation to either HVAC or the American people. VA officials, unsurprisingly, continue to dodge Committee oversight requests.”

Most recently, on July 7, 2016, Coffman penned a letter to Secretary McDonald demanding the “thousands of pages of documentation from the AIB,” as well as a complete legal explanation as to why the 31-page redacted memo provided to HVAC is allegedly protected under the Privacy Act, no later than August 31, 2016.

To date, the VA has not complied with the August 31st deadline.

“It appears to be business as usual at the VA: Hide the truth from the veterans they claim to serve and taxpayers who fund them,” Coffman continued.

A Marine Corps combat veteran, Coffman serves on the House Armed Services Committee and House Veteran’s Affairs Committee, where he is the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations.

Coffman has been a leader in reforming VA hospital construction practices.  Coffman’s reforms stripped the VA of their construction management authority following years of delays and over $1 billion in cost overruns at the Aurora VA hospital. The Army Corps of Engineers has now taken over the Aurora VA hospital construction following Coffman’s reforms.

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Rep. Coffman Honors John Yee on the House Floor

2016-09-23 14:37:33


Rep. Coffman Honors the Life of Chelsey Jean Hood Russell on the House Floor

2016-09-14 21:39:52


Rep. Coffman Speaks in Support of Motion to Subpoena VA's AIB Documents on Aurora VA Hospital

2016-09-12 18:26:35


Rep. Mike Coffman Welcomes 74 New Citizens at Naturalization Ceremony in Aurora

2016-07-29 15:08:30


Rep. Coffman on Nuclear Deterrent Modernization Plans and Budgets

2016-07-15 16:01:44


Rep. Coffman Calls for Public Release of VA AIB Report on Aurora VA Hospital

2016-07-08 15:18:50


Rep. Coffman on Goldwater-Nichols Reform

2016-07-07 18:17:30


Rep. Coffman Speaks on House Floor to Defund Selective Service System

2016-07-07 18:08:59


Rep. Coffman Speaks on House Floor in Opposition to Closing GTMO

2016-05-18 15:12:54


Rep. Coffman Cosponsors Legislation Improving Reproductive Treatments for Disabled Veterans

2016-05-18 13:35:40


Rep. Coffman Testifies on EARN IT Act

2016-05-12 20:31:30


Rep. Coffman on Preventing Veteran Suicide

2016-05-12 20:27:52


Coffman Presses VA Officials On Delays in Veterans’ Healthcare

2016-04-19 18:09:17


Rep. Coffman Questions VA Officials on Appointment Scheduling for Veterans

2016-04-14 18:55:10


Rep. Coffman Congratulates ThunderRidge Girls Basketball on State Championship Win

2016-04-12 18:23:06


Rep. Coffman on Honoring WASPs at Arlington National Cemetery

2016-03-22 19:54:13


Rep. Coffman on FY2017 National Defense Authorization Act Budget

2016-03-22 19:21:03


Rep. Coffman on Choice Consolidation: Leveraging Provider Networks to Increase Veteran Access

2016-03-22 18:55:56


Rep. Coffman Speaks on S.2393 - the Foreclosure Relief and Extension for Servicemembers Act of 2015

2016-03-21 21:14:46


Rep. Coffman Congratulates Valor Christian Girls Swim & Dive on State Championship

2016-03-21 18:33:41


Contact Information

2443 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-7882
Fax 202-226-4623
coffman.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Veterans Affairs

Armed Services

Mike Coffman began his distinguished career of serving our nation at a very young age.  At age seventeen, after finishing his junior year at Aurora Central High School in 1972, he enlisted in the U.S. Army.   Through the Army, Coffman was able to earn a high school diploma.  In 1974, he left active duty to attend the University of Colorado under the G.I. Bill where he continued his military career by serving in the U.S. Army Reserve.  Coffman took a leave of absence from the U.S. Army Reserve and the University of Colorado to attend D.G. Vaishnav College in Chennai, India in 1976 and the University of Veracruz in Xalapa, Mexico in 1977.  Coffman graduated from the University of Colorado in 1979 and immediately transferred from the U.S. Army Reserve to the U.S. Marine Corps where he served as an infantry officer.

In 1983, Coffman came back home to Colorado and started a small business, an Aurora-based property management company, that would grow to over 20 employees. He remained the senior share holder of the firm for the next seventeen years until selling his interest in 2000. While in business, he continued serving in the military by joining the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve.

In his role as a Colorado small business owner, Coffman saw the need to bring more common sense pro-growth economic policies to state government so he ran and was elected to the State House of Representatives in 1988 and re-elected in 1990.  Shortly after his 1990 re-election, Coffman took an unpaid leave of absence from the state legislature and volunteered to return to active duty for the first Gulf War where he served as the executive officer for a light armored infantry company.   The battalion that Coffman served in was ordered to attack and defend positions inside of Kuwait, for three consecutive days prior to the main ground attack, as part of a deception and reconnaissance-by-fire operation.  Coffman retired from the military in 1994 after having served for seven years between the U.S. Army and the Army Reserve and thirteen years between the U.S. Marine Corps and the Marine Corps Reserve.

In 1994, Coffman was elected to the State Senate where he served as the chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.  While in the State Senate, he completed the Senior Executive Program for State and Local Government at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.  In 1998, Coffman was elected to the office of State Treasurer and re-elected in 2002.  In 2005, the U.S. Marine Corps was under strength in meeting their requirements for the Iraq War and begun to extend Marines beyond their active duty enlistments, recall Marines recently released from active duty, and selectively reach out to retired Marines and request their return to active duty.   Coffman resigned his position as the State Treasurer and volunteered to return to the U.S. Marine Corps for an assignment in Iraq.  In Iraq, Coffman was a civil affairs officer where he worked in support of the Independent Electoral Commission of Iraq (IECI) in 2005 and in 2006 he was reassigned to help establish interim local governments in the Western Euphrates River Valley.

In 2006, Coffman came home after completing a full tour of duty in Iraq and was appointed by Governor Bill Owens to serve out the remainder of his term as the State Treasurer.  In that same year, he ran and was elected to the Office of Secretary of State and served in that capacity until he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2008.

Coffman is the only veteran in the Colorado delegation and the only Member of Congress to have served in both the first Gulf War and in the Iraq War.  Congressman Coffman represents the 6th Congressional District of Colorado and serves on the Armed Services Committee, the Veteran’s Affairs Committee where he is the Chairman for the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, and on the House Committee on Small Business.

Coffman and his wife Cynthia were married in 2005 just before he deployed to Iraq with the U.S. Marine Corps.  Cynthia Coffman was the Chief Legal Counsel to Governor Bill Owens before becoming the Chief Deputy Attorney General for the State of Colorado under Attorney General John Suthers.  Coffman attends Faith Presbyterian Church in Aurora with his eighty year-old mother, Dorothy Coffman.


Serving With

Scott Tipton

COLORADO's 3rd DISTRICT

Ken Buck

COLORADO's 4th DISTRICT

Doug Lamborn

COLORADO's 5th DISTRICT

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