Mark Meadows

Mark Meadows

NORTH CAROLINA's 11th DISTRICT

Mark's Weekly Update

2015/02/23

 Fighting Against the President's Executive Amnesty Last week, I joined 170 of my Republican colleagues, led by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), to send a letter to Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid demanding Senate Democrats allow debate on the House-passed bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). On February 27th, current funding for DHS expires, leaving our border patrol agents and other critical security figures at risk of not receiving paychecks. The House-passed bill would fully fund DHS at previously agreed to levels, while withholding funding for President Obama's unlawful executive order granting amnesty to millions of illegal immigrants. Senate Democrats aren't simply opposing the House-passed bill, they are refusing to even debate the bill or its potential amendments. If Senate Democrats have an issue with the version passed by the House, then they should make the revisions they would like to see through the formal Amendment process-- that is how our government is supposed to work. I fear that Senate Democrats are playing politics with America's national security in an effort to protect the President's unconstitutional executive action and to protect themselves from having to go on the record with their pro-amnesty positions.    Making sure that DHS is properly funded is of the utmost importance. I hope that my colleagues in the Senate will do the right thing and listen to the American people. It's time to stop with the political games. It's time to lead. You can read the full letter here.   Remembering former Congressman Cass Ballenger I was saddened to hear of the passing of former Congressman Cass Ballenger (NC-10) who served in the United States House of Representatives from 1986-2005. I'm grateful for his many years of service to the people of North Carolina. Mr. Ballenger represented North Carolina's 10th Congressional District, which at the time of his service incorporated parts of the 11th District. Mr. Ballenger will be remembered for his selfless service to his community, his commitment to providing top-notch constituent services, and his gracious nature that anyone who knew him could attest to.  The people of North Carolina have lost a dedicated civil servant who set the bar incredibly high for those of us who have followed in his footsteps. All who knew him will remember his warm and gracious nature and the selfless way he assisted his community. I am grateful for the many ways he served – from his time on the Catawba Board of Commissioners to his years in Congress. Mr. Ballenger is survived by his wife of 63 years, Donna Ballenger, his three daughters, Lucinda Ballenger, Melissa Jordan, and Davis Weaver, and three grandchildren. My thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends.You can read more about his life of service in the Asheville Citizen-Times here.   Photo via Asheville Citizen-Times     Standing with Israel A new poll released last week found that the majority of Americans support Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's planned speech before Congress next month. This should come as no surprise. The American people support free and open discourse and want to hear from our allies. The White House fears that the Prime Minister's speech will undermine the already deteriorating nuclear talks with Iran. My question for the President is: Why are you willing to negotiate with Iran and Cuba, but unwilling to support a speech by the Prime Minister of Israel before a joint session of Congress? I'm proud to support the Prime Minister and look forward to attending the speech to hear from one of our nation's greatest allies.          Read More

Breitbart: Congressman Wants to Block Porn from Government Computers

2015/02/19

Citing in part reporting from The Washington Times, a Republican congressman has re-introduced legisation which would prohibit federal employees from surfing the Web for pornography while using government computers and devices. The bill follows a scandal last year when an Environmental Protection Agency employee was caught viewing as much as six hours of porn a day, as well as having downloaded as many as 7,000 pornographic files onto his work computer. According to Rep. Mark Meadows, North Carolina Republican, the employee who was implicated in an inspector general’s report last year has yet to be fired. A separate Washington Times investigation revealed that government employees in multiple agencies and departments, including the Federal Communications Commission and the Commerce Department, have been caught viewing pornography on the job, blaming in part the lack of work and boredom. “It’s appalling that it requires an act of Congress to ensure that federal agencies block access to these sites,” Mr. Meadows said, “While there are rules in place at most agencies to ban this kind of unprofessional and potentially hostile workplace behavior, it continues to take place.” The lawmaker added that the practice presents malware and cyber-security risks in these federal agencies, as well as acts as a waste of federal resources and taxpayer money. Mr. Meadows introduced a similar bill last year in the 113th Congress, but it was not enacted.   Read More

Washington Times: Mark Meadows revives bill to block porn-surfing by bureaucrats

2015/02/19

Citing in part reporting from The Washington Times, a Republican congressman has re-introduced legisation which would prohibit federal employees from surfing the Web for pornography while using government computers and devices. The bill follows a scandal last year when an Environmental Protection Agency employee was caught viewing as much as six hours of porn a day, as well as having downloaded as many as 7,000 pornographic files onto his work computer. According to Rep. Mark Meadows, North Carolina Republican, the employee who was implicated in an inspector general’s report last year has yet to be fired. A separate Washington Times investigation revealed that government employees in multiple agencies and departments, including the Federal Communications Commission and the Commerce Department, have been caught viewing pornography on the job, blaming in part the lack of work and boredom. “It’s appalling that it requires an act of Congress to ensure that federal agencies block access to these sites,” Mr. Meadows said, “While there are rules in place at most agencies to ban this kind of unprofessional and potentially hostile workplace behavior, it continues to take place.” The lawmaker added that the practice presents malware and cyber-security risks in these federal agencies, as well as acts as a waste of federal resources and taxpayer money. Mr. Meadows introduced a similar bill last year in the 113th Congress, but it was not enacted. Read More

Washington Post: Push for transportation bill faces a couple of speed bumps

2015/02/19

House Republicans and Democrats sang in unison Wednesday about the need to come up with a solution to the transportation crisis before funding runs out May 31, but the bipartisan chorus may face speed bumps over paying for transit systems, and pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure. Reining in rural state lawmakers who want every penny of gas-tax revenue spent on roads and bridges will fall to Bill Shuster (R.-Pa.), chairman of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure who held the gavel Wednesday as the 59-member committee quizzed Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx about administration plans for a long-term transportation bill. Part of the White House proposal, which has yet to land on Capitol Hill, is a bump up in the money designated for upgrading and expanding transit systems. “That’s very difficult for me to sell in North Carolina,” said Rep. Mark Meadows (R.-N.C.), whose district includes 16 rural counties in the western tip of the state, “because most of the transit money has gone to six cities that are not in North Carolina.” Foxx countered with a grin. “Is Charlotte still in North Carolina?” he joked. Foxx is the former mayor of that city of 800,000.   The battle over how scarce dollars from the rapidly dwindling Highway Trust Fund should be spent first emerged three years ago as the House considered what would become a two-year surface transportation bill that has been extended until the end of May. Congressmen who represented states outside of the megalopolises that include Chicago and the East and West Coasts challenged using cash from the trust fund for anything but roadways. Their effort was blunted and ultimately defeated when Republicans and Democrats from cities and suburban areas joined forces. Almost half of the House transportation committee, including many who want decision making taken out of federal hands, won election after that battle was fought. “It’s distressing to folks when they see a large bike project — 10 miles of bike trails — when we can’t get the bridges fixed,” said Brian Babin (R.-Tex.), who represents eight rural counties northeast of Houston.   That played into a concept central to Foxx’s thinking. Foxx, who has joined Shuster in a bipartisan alliance to get a highway bill passed, last month came out with a 30-year outline for the nation’s transportation future, a document he hopes will engender discussion about the future. “I don’t think we should plan for a [transportation] system that’s 1956. We should plan for 2045,” Foxx said. He cited demographic shifts that have more people moving to urban hubs, many of them to downtown core areas that were abandoned by their parents a generation ago. “I think the small amount we’re putting into bike and pedestrian [projects] is worth it,” he said. “I think the mistake is [to think] that transit isn’t critical.” Foxx said the forthcoming administration transportation proposal would add $478 billion to spending levels over the next six years. “Against what we need, it’s not such a big number,” he said, referring to estimates of a need for trillions of infrastructure investment. “Remember that others are calling for far more. We need to set the ceiling [for investment], not the floor.” The question of where the money will come from — $62 billion in general tax revenue has been needed since 2008 to bolster the highway trust fund — was a question on everyone’s minds. “We’re all like a bunch of dogs circling around a skunk,” said Rep. Don Young (R.-Alaska). “The skunk is how we’re going to fund this program. No one has addressed the question of funding.” Read More

Washington Examiner: Oversight Committee probes Washington Metro's safety gaps

2015/02/19

A congressional probe of the oversight failures that led to the Jan. 12 incident on a Washington metro line, which claimed the life of a Virginia woman, revealed first responders may have been unaware that a stranded train full of passengers was still in the smoke-filled tunnel for a prolonged period of time due to major breakdowns in communications. Lawmakers excoriated representatives from the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority and transit police for their failure to correct systemic problems that have repeatedly surfaced in reviews but have never been corrected. “I’m stunned that WMATA even needed a federal agency to remind it that it needed a ventilation system in good working order,” Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., said during a House Oversight and Government Reform subcommittee hearing Friday. A joint hearing of the government operations and transportation subcommittees sought details from the day a tunnel near the L’Enfant Plaza metro station in downtown Washington filled with smoke while passengers on a train stuck inside were not evacuated for at least a half hour. As many as 84 passengers required treatment after inhaling harmful smoke. Edward Mills, assistant fire chief with D.C. Fire and Emergency Services, said radio technology failed inside the tunnels and caused confusion when first responders arrived at L’Enfant. Mills said rescuers saw an empty train on the platform at L’Enfant and were unsure if it was the only train in the smoke-filled area. Once they were made aware a train containing passengers was still inside the tunnel, the first responders headed into the darkness despite the fact that electricity may still have been flowing through the rails, Mills testified. A breakdown in communications apparently prevented WMATA from communicating with the rescuers about whether the rails were live, putting everyone involved at risk. Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., pressed witnesses from transit agencies about why no one was alerted to the potentially electrified tracks before first responders made the call to forge ahead anyway. “How many people have to die before we can answer that question: Why didn’t that happen?” Meadows said. Jackie Jeter, president of the union that represents many Washington transit workers, criticized the apathetic attitude toward safety that permeates the ranks of WMATA. “The task of developing a safety culture has not been met,” Jeter said of the agency. “Most of our members are not sent to safety training until they make a mistake.” The hearing was marked by emotional testimony from a survivor who shed new light on what took place inside one of the trapped metro cars Jan. 12. Jonathan Rogers broke down in tears describing his attempts to perform CPR on Carol Glover, the Alexandria mother of two who died from the complications of smoke inhalation, during the final moments of her life. Rogers also shared a cell phone video he had taken that afternoon showing dozens of passengers struggling to breath in a dark, hazy train car. Several of the committee members questioned transit authorities as to why safety flaws revealed by a deadly 2009 collision on a different metro line had not yet been corrected. “We knew about this as a problem years ago,” Connolly said. “What have we done to make sure our passengers are safe?” Read More

Citizen-Times: Mark Meadows trying again on federal worker porn ban

2015/02/13

Eleventh District U.S. Rep. Mark Meadows is trying again with a bill to make it clear that federal employees are not allowed to view pornography on the job. Meadows, a Jackson County Republican, on Wednesday introduced a bill to prohibit federal workers from accessing pornographic or explicit material on government computers or devices. He introduced a similar measure last September, late in the congressional calendar, that went nowhere. Meadows said the move was prompted by a case described in a May 2014 committee meeting of an EPA employee found to have spent as much as six hours a day looking at porn on the job using his work computer who was suspended with pay but had yet to be dismissed months later. Meadows’ office said similar cases have surfaced since then. “It’s appalling that it requires an act of Congress to ensure that federal agencies block access to these sites,” Meadows said in a statement. “While there are rules in place at most agencies to ban this kind of unprofessional and potentially hostile workplace behavior, it continues to take place. There is absolutely no excuse for federal employees to be viewing and downloading pornographic materials on the taxpayers’ dime,” he said. It appeared last year that the EPA worker was still on the job not because there was no policy preventing the actions, but because firing someone at the agency for any reason is a complicated process. Many federal agencies explicitly ban the practice, and an EPA policy says workers can be fired for using government equipment to look at “materials that are sexually explicit or sexually oriented.” Read More

Roll Call: Bowser Talks Metro and Marijuana on Capitol Hill

2015/02/13

Two weeks after meeting with Speaker John A. Boehner, District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser was back on Capitol Hill Thursday to meet with Democratic leaders and others to discuss D.C. issues, including Metro funding, marijuana legalization and autonomy. Bowser told CQ Roll Call after her discussion with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., that the meetings were part of an ongoing effort to foster relationships on Capitol Hill. She also met with House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md.; Assistant Democratic Leader James E. Clyburn, D-S.C.; and the leaders of the oversight subcommittee with jurisdiction over D.C. “Our focus has been on creating new relationships between the mayor and members of the Congress,” Bowser said. “And so I just wanted to let Leader Pelosi know that our door is open.” Bowser said she asked Pelosi to “keep an eye on” funding for  the Department of Homeland Security’s move to the St. Elizabeth’s hospital site in Southeast D.C. They also discussed the District’s marijuana legalization initiative, which faces an uncertain future with GOP opposition in Congress, and funding for the Metro. When asked what Pelosi said during their discussion of the marijuana initiative, Bowser responded, “Her concern is that residents of the District of Columbia should enjoy the rights that every other American has. And that their elected leaders and voters should pass laws that affect the residents of the District of Columbia, without intrusion by the Congress.” Bowser also discussed funding for the D.C. Metro system, an issue that came to the forefront this week after the Washington Area Metro Transit Authority released its proposed 2016 budget Monday, revealing that Metro faces a funding gap. In the budget, WMATA proposed a fare increase of up to 10 cents and cuts in late-night services and some bus services to make up for the shortfall. Following WMATA’s announcement, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., said she would introduce a bill to restore parity between transit benefits and parking benefits. Norton said a reduction of transit benefits led to a 25 percent decrease in D.C. Metro ridership. On Thursday, Bowser, said she raised the issue with Pelosi. “The federal government, of course, is a big user of our Metro system,” Bowser said. “Transit parity is one way to get there but ultimately there will be capital needs as well.” Bowser also discussed the Metro system with leaders of the House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Government Operations, which has jurisdiction over D.C. issues. The committee’s chairman, Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., said their discussion focused mainly on Metro safety. The subcommittee is holding a hearing on Metro safety on Friday. “I think most of it is really trying to just make sure that the Metro that all of us depend on operates efficiently and safely,” Meadows said. “And [Bowser] did mention that there’s a lot of deferred maintenance that she believes needs to be addressed. And so we’ve agreed to certainly take a real strong look at all of those issues.” Metro safety issues also made headlines this week, after the National Transportation Safety Board issued “urgent recommendations” Wednesday for improving Metro’s ventilation system following a deadly incident in January when a Metro train stopped inside a tunnel, and passengers were trapped as the train filled with smoke. Meadows said he, along with Rep. Gerald E. Connolly, D-Va., also discussed budget autonomy for the District of Columbia with the mayor. Though Meadows said the issue has “not been on my top ten list of things to deal with,” he expressed a desire to ensure that the city functions in cases where the federal appropriations process stalls. “I shared with her that it’s certainly our desire to make sure that school kids get to go to school regardless of what happens in the federal issues here,” Meadows said. Meadows also said they briefly discussed the marijuana initiative, and while they did not resolve any differences, the conversations would continue. “I think that the real difficult thing, with regards to that issue, is you have a mayor who wants to represent the will of the people that elected her. And yet you have a sense of Congress that is contrary to that,” Meadows said. “And where does that leave us? And so, again, we’re going to have to have a number of follow-up conversations.” Read More

Yahoo News: This Proposed Law Would Ban Federal Employees from Watching Porn on the Job

2015/02/13

Maybe this could finally help get congress to work. A new piece of legislation introduced in the House Wednesday looks to officially outlaw federal employees from viewing pornographic materials while on the job. There is currently no nation-wide regulation definitively prohibiting NSFW behavior by employees of the state. That fact was brought to popular attention last May when an Environmental Protection Agency worker was accused of downloading over 7,000 pornographic files on his government-issued computer. The agency said the employee spent as much as six hours of his work day viewing these files. The author of the new Eliminating Pornography From Agencies Act, Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., points out in a blog post about the prospective law that the unnamed EPA employee has yet to be fired, and that other similar reports of porn-surfing federal employees have popped up since. Though the new law, if passed, would obviously not result in any international mandate, the problem it looks to tackle is not just exclusive to the U.S. Three Indian politicians were forced to resign in 2012 after they were caught viewing pornography on a smartphone during a session of parliament. And a 2013 report indicates that, in a year’s time, there were over300,000 attempts to reach pornographic websites on the networks that service the British Parliament. Randy… The bill introduced in the U.S. Congress Wednesday is the second Meadows has authored with the same name. Govtrack.usgives his latest attempt a “2%” chance of being enacted. Unfortunately for Meadows, it’s pretty difficult to get a law passed by congress when all of its members are so busy with…computer work. Read More

Breitbart: Congressman Files Bill to Block Porn at Federal Agencies

2015/02/13

Republican Congressman Mark Meadows (NC) has introduced his Eliminating Pornography from Agencies Act this week, which would make it very naughty, and prevent government employees from having access to porn or other “explicit material” while they are working on “government computers and devices.” Meadows mentioned in a press release the incident where an EPA employee was caught viewing a daily 6 hour dose of pornography, as well as downloading thousands of “pornographic files on to government computer.” Last year, an Inspector General report revealed that one Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) employee, who still has his job, was viewing as much as 6 hours of pornography a day in his office on his government computer. The same federal employee was found to have downloaded as many as 7,000 pornographic files onto his government computer. To date, this employee has yet to be fired and we continue to learn of similar bad actors. “While there are rules in place at most agencies to ban this kind of unprofessional and potentially hostile workplace behavior, it continues to take place. There is absolutely no excuse for federal employees to be viewing and downloading pornographic materials on the taxpayers’ dime…“Further, downloading these files, which are often ridden with viruses and malware, poses a cybersecurity threat at our federal agencies. This commonsense legislation ensures that federal workers have a comfortable, safe work environment and protects taxpayer resources from being misused.”-Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) There is no word yet of whether or not former President Bill Clinton, who may have a thing or two to say about this, will oppose or support Meadows’ bill. Read More

ADVISORY: Oversight Committee to Examine Safety of D.C. Metro

2015/02/12

  On Friday, February 13, 2015, the House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Government Operations, chaired by Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC), and the Subcommittee on Transportation and Public Assets will hold a joint hearing to examine safety gaps within Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority’s (WMATA) Metrorail system.   The hearing titled, “D.C. Metro: Is There a Safety Gap?”, will address safety concerns surrounding WMATA’s management of the Metrorail system in the wake of a January 12, 2015 incident that resulted in the death of a passenger and the hospitalization of more than 80 riders.   HEARING DETAILS: WHAT:   Hearing titled: “D.C. Metro: Is There a Safety Gap?”   Subcommittee on Transportation and Public Assets, Chairman John Mica (R-FL) Subcommittee on Government Operations, Chairman Mark Meadows (R-NC) WHERE:     Oversight and Government Reform Hearing Room  Rayburn House Office Building, Room 2154 DATE: Friday, February 13, 2015 TIME: 9:00 a.m. EST   WITNESS LIST:   Mr. Jonathan Rogers January 12, 2015 Metrorail passenger   The Honorable Christopher A. Hart Acting Chairman National Transportation Safety Board   Mr. Mortimer L. Downey Board of Directors, Chairman Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority   Mr. Edward R. Mills Assistant Fire Chief- Operations DC Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department   Ms. Jackie L. Jeter President & Business Agent Amalgamated Transit Union, Local 689   The meeting is open to the public and a live video stream will be broadcast here.  Congressman Mark Meadows chairs the Subcommittee on Government Operations. ### Read More

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Contact Information

1516 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-6401
Fax 202-226-6422
meadows.house.gov

After working as a small business owner for 27 years, Representative Mark Meadows brings a business-style approach to Washington, D.C.

From owning and selling a successful restaurant to building a development company, Mark understands what the 63.7 million people in the United States who are self-employed or work for small businesses need to grow their businesses.  He believes real job creation comes from the private sector, not the federal government.  Mark recognizes that regulations are stifling job growth in this country and without a budget to set spending priorities, our federal government will continue to spend beyond its means.

While serving on the Committees on Oversight and Government Reform, Foreign Affairs, and Transportation and Infrastructure, Mark will hold the government accountable, protect American citizens and interests abroad, and ensure we have a modern transportation network which meets the needs of Western North Carolina and our country as a whole.

He is dedicated to providing top-notch constituent services to North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District and committed to upholding his Christian values and conservative principles while serving in Congress.

Mark lives in Jackson County with his wife Debbie. They have two college-age children, Blake and Haley.


Serving With

Renee Ellmers

NORTH CAROLINA's 2nd DISTRICT

Walter Jones

NORTH CAROLINA's 3rd DISTRICT

Virginia Foxx

NORTH CAROLINA's 5th DISTRICT

Mark Walker

NORTH CAROLINA's 6th DISTRICT

David Rouzer

NORTH CAROLINA's 7th DISTRICT

Richard Hudson

NORTH CAROLINA's 8th DISTRICT

Robert Pittenger

NORTH CAROLINA's 9th DISTRICT

Patrick McHenry

NORTH CAROLINA's 10th DISTRICT

George Holding

NORTH CAROLINA's 13th DISTRICT

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