Kristi Noem

Kristi Noem

SOUTH DAKOTA

Tax Reform Designed for Agriculture, Says Noem

2017/11/18

While speaking at the South Dakota Farm Bureau Centennial Convention Saturday evening, Rep. Kristi Noem discussed her fight for a tax code that works better for agriculture. Noem serves as one of the only farmers and ranchers on the House Ways and Means Committee, which has primary jurisdiction over tax reform. During the closing debate on tax reform in the House, Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady – a Rapid City native and University of South Dakota graduate – called Noem “a champion of family-owned farms and businesses.”

“Our farm has been in the family for more than a century,” said Noem. “The tax reform proposal we’re working on is designed to help farms across South Dakota last a century more.”

Noem continued: “Many South Dakotans have heard my story. After my dad died in a farming accident, we were hit by the Death Tax, which affected our operation for nearly a decade. I’m thrilled the House tax reform bill would finally get rid of this un-American tax.”

Grover Norquist, President of Americans for Tax Reform stated Noem’s “hard work and persistence has made our progress to date possible and is our greatest asset in the serious fight to kill the Death Tax once and for all.”

The House tax reform proposal includes a full and permanent repeal of the Death Tax, based on Noem’s Death Tax Repeal Act. It also includes key provisions designed to help farmers and ranchers succeed, including lower tax rates, immediate expensing, and provisions related to like-kind exchanges.

South Dakota Farm Bureau President Scott VanderWal, who testified before Noem’s House Ways & Means Committee about tax reform, stated, “This is a tax reform built for farmers, and Rep. Noem was integral in achieving that. From significantly lower tax rates to repealing the Death Tax, the Tax Cut and Jobs Act is more fair and takes a big step toward rewarding rather than punishing hard work and success.”

“It’s not just the Death Tax that disproportionately impacts South Dakota producers,” said Noem. “Almost any farmer you talk to will tell you that taxes are too high. We’re going to change that. Through tax reform, we significantly lower tax rates and double the standard deduction, which is going to make a significant difference in the tax bill producers receive. But we also allow for interest deductibility. I fought to get immediate expensing included as well, and we were successful in getting other expensing tools that are critical for highly-leveraged industries like agriculture. This is a proposal designed with farmers and ranchers in mind. It’s designed to keep more money in their pockets.”

During the process of helping to draft the House’s tax reform proposal, Noem has met with hundreds of South Dakotans to discuss the plan – both in the state and in her Washington, D.C. office. The House passed their tax reform proposal in mid-November. The Senate continues to debate their version. Once passed, the House and Senate will go to Conference to merge the two documents before both chambers take a final vote and put the legislation on the president’s desk.

KEY TAX REFORMS FOR FARMERS AND RANCHERS

Significantly lowers individual tax rates and puts a historically low small business rate in place.

Nearly doubles the standard deduction to $24,000 for married couples and $12,000 for single filers.

Repeals the Death Tax by 2025, doubling the exclusion for the first seven years and maintaining stepped-up basis.

Allows for immediate expensing, which will help farmers upgrade their operations by letting taxpayers depreciate 100 percent of qualified expenses the year they are purchased. It would also now apply the expensing benefits to assets in which the taxpayer is not the original owner.

Expands interest deductibility, which allows farmers and ranchers to deduct interest payments and is critical for a highly-leveraged industry like agriculture.

Expands cash accounting to protect farmers and others from paying taxes on things they have yet to receive payment on.

Preserves options for like-kind exchanges.

Expands Section 179, which allows farmers and ranchers to deduct the cost of some types of property as an expense, allowing farmers to better manage depreciation.

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Blessed, Honored, and Thankful

2017/11/17

The story of the first Thanksgiving is one you’ve probably heard (some version of it anyway). But I recently came across what happened a couple of years later when the second Thanksgiving was celebrated. The pilgrims had faced a tough drought that year. It hit their yields pretty hard and food became scarce. The colony’s governor called for a fast to preserve resources. When the fast was finally lifted, the pilgrims gathered together and the thanksgiving feast began.

I imagine their meal was hardly the spread many of us have today, but there’s something neat about the fact that this tradition of gratitude has lasted through the generations.

While we don’t face a food shortage as the pilgrims did, South Dakota does understand the impact of a drought. It’s made for a really rough harvest in much of the state this year and forced many families to tighten their belts a bit.

I became the general manager of our farm in the mid-1990’s, so I’ve been through years like this. They were tough. But looking back, I know we had so much to be grateful for. We built a lot of efficiencies into our operation during those lean years (to be fair, we had to). It forced us to diversify our operation, which led me to start a hunting lodge – an experience I still appreciate today. The long days could be grueling, but there’s a part of me that misses them now. We worked hard, but we worked as a family. And those memories mean the world to me.

My day-to-day life looks different today, but I still count the blessings. I get frustrated by Washington a lot, but I never take for granted the responsibility you’ve given me.  I’m honored beyond belief to represent South Dakota. I’m grateful for the love and compassion so many have shown. I’m grateful for those who are willing to talk with me about the things we disagree on. I’m grateful for every win we achieve and to share the experiences of South Dakota with folks from across the country. I’m grateful to be able to travel the state almost every week and to spend time with people I might not have had the chance to otherwise connect with.

When you’re in the thick of things, it can be hard to see the blessings that are right in front of you. I recognize that. But taking the time to acknowledge those blessings can really shift a person’s perspective. My mom is a big fan of Willie Nelson, and I loved how he put it: “When I started counting my blessings, my whole life turned around.”

Like many families, we take time to count our blessings at the Thanksgiving table every year. Part of me has always wondered if the pilgrims shared that tradition too. While so much has changed over the last 400-plus years, I wouldn’t be surprised if the conversations around the Thanksgiving table were actually quite similar: I’m grateful for family, for a home, for freedom, for what we could harvest despite the drought.

From Bryon, Kassidy, Kennedy, Booker and I, we wish you a blessed Thanksgiving.  Read More

With Noem's Leadership, House Passes Tax Reform Proposal

2017/11/16

The U.S. House of Representatives today passed a landmark tax reform proposal, drafted in part by Rep. Kristi Noem. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which has found support from many South Dakotans, is expected to increase wages by 3.1 percent, add nearly 1 million jobs, and raise after-tax incomes by thousands of dollars, according to the non-partisan Tax Foundation. Meanwhile, the Joint Committee on Taxation found there would be “a tax benefit to all income categories.”

“I have worked hours going line by line through this legislation to make sure the policies contained in it are going to work for families, that they’ll increase wages for folks, and create more opportunity in America,” said Noem.

On the House Ways & Means Committee, which has primary jurisdiction over tax reform, Noem has championed many of the bill’s family-centered policies. Noem was vocal about the need to significantly expand the Child Tax Credit and led efforts to ensure the Child Care Credit and flexible spending benefits remained in the House proposal.

“I am extremely proud of the steps we’ve taken to strengthen families in this bill,” continued Noem. “South Dakota has the highest rate of working moms in the nation. Parents are already stretched thin, so the provisions in this bill are designed to help them – help them pay their bills, take care of their kids, go to work, and maybe at the end of the day, take a weekend where they can go and do something fun with their kids. That’s important to South Dakota.”

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act also includes a handful of provisions Noem has previously introduced as stand-alone legislation. More specifically, the House tax reform proposal fully and permanently repeals the Death Tax by 2025, based on Noem’s Death Tax Repeal Act. Additionally, the bill excludes the Indian Health Service’s Student Loan Repayment program from tax, a provision that was pulled from Noem’s 2016 HEALTTH Act. Moreover, as one of the only members of the House Ways & Means Committee with a background in agriculture, Noem championed efforts to give farmers, ranchers, and small businesses better expensing tools and drive down the tax rate for small businesses.

“If we’re going to keep kids in South Dakota, we need to create opportunities in South Dakota,” Noem explained. “This tax reform package protects family farms from one generation to the next and makes it easier for South Dakota’s hardworking job creators to thrive.”

The Senate continues to debate their version of tax reform. Once passed, the House and Senate will go to Conference to merge the two documents before both chambers take a final vote and put the legislation on the president’s desk.

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South Dakota bends IHS' ear

2017/11/14

South Dakota's Congressional Delegation on Tuesday met with President Trump's choice for head of the Indian Health Service, and they gave Robert Weaver an earful of complaints.

“Unfortunately, we’ve become all too familiar with the horrific problems that occur at IHS, and it is important for Mr. Weaver to understand the importance of restoring trust and accountability in the agency, particularly in the Great Plains region,” said Senator John Thune.

Senator Mike Rounds weighed in.

“For years, Indian Health Service has failed to fulfill its trust and treaty obligation to provide adequate health care to tribal members. The quality of care at IHS facilities in the Great Plains Region is simply unacceptable."  Rounds said he shared with Weaver his proposed legislation for a comprehensive review of the IHS.

Last but not least, Kristi Noem shared her concerns.

“The Great Plains area of the IHS is a train wreck,” she said, “We’re going to need aggressive, out-of-the-box thinking to get things back on track. During today’s meeting, I stressed with Mr. Weaver just how urgent the situation truly is..."

Weaver is a member of the Quapaw Tribe in Oklahoma. He was nominated by the President last month. Weaver has nearly two decades of experience in hospital, mental health administration, and entrepreneurship.

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Delegation Meets With Indian Health Services Director Nominee

2017/11/14

U.S. Sens. John Thune (R-S.D.) and Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem (R-S.D.) today met with Robert Weaver, the president’s nominee to be director of Indian Health Service (IHS). Weaver, who was nominated for the position in October, has nearly two decades of experience in hospital, mental health administration, and entrepreneurship. Weaver is a member of the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma and is currently a consultative representative to U.S. Government Relations for his tribe in the area of health care.

“Unfortunately, we’ve become all too familiar with the horrific problems that occur at IHS, and it is important for Mr. Weaver to understand the importance of restoring trust and accountability in the agency, particularly in the Great Plains region,” said Thune. “Our meeting today gave me the opportunity to let Mr. Weaver know that fixing the IHS system and dramatically improving the quality of care provided to tribal members is one of my top priorities, and, if confirmed, I am committed to working with him to improve the agency.”

“I appreciated the opportunity to meet with Mr. Weaver today,” said Rounds. “For years, Indian Health Service has failed to fulfill its trust and treaty obligation to provide adequate health care to tribal members. The quality of care at IHS facilities in the Great Plains Region is simply unacceptable. During our meeting, we had the chance to talk about my proposed legislation to require an assessment of the financial, administrative and quality problems at the agency, and I was pleased that he agrees on the necessity of such an assessment. He also agreed on the importance of consultation with tribal leaders. If confirmed, I look forward to working with him and tribal leaders to identify and fix the many problems at IHS.”

“The Great Plains area of the IHS is a train wreck,” said Noem. “We’re going to need aggressive, out-of-the-box thinking to get things back on track. During today’s meeting, I stressed with Mr. Weaver just how urgent the situation truly is and how great the deficiency of care really is. I was also grateful to talk through some of the solutions I see ahead. The bottom line is this though: Families are receiving third-world care and it’s costing them their lives. This needs to be fixed now.”

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Weekly Column: True Patriots

2017/11/10

Every November, we set aside time to recognize those who have acted on our behalf to protect freedom and defend our liberties – those who have worn our nation’s uniform – who have earned the title “Patriot” and can call themselves a “United States Veteran.”

More than 72,000 veterans call South Dakota home. Each has spent years serving so others could enjoy the blessings of liberty that we celebrate in this country. As a small token of gratitude for their sacrifices, our office hosted a Veterans Day Open House this year in Sioux Falls. For a few hours, we sat down and talked with South Dakota veterans over cookies and coffee, helping many navigate complicated federal programs, such as Social Security and VA benefits.  I’m incredibly grateful to those who took the time to stop in, and I hope others recognize our door is always open to you.

In addition to helping veterans get the federal benefits to which they’re entitled, I’ve been fighting to make sure the promises made to veterans are kept. This summer, for instance, President Trump signed legislation I supported that aims to expand whistleblower protections within the VA and streamline the process required to fire any VA employee. This is a critical step in improving VA operations.

More recently, we worked with the president to give troops the largest pay raise in years and expand veterans’ access to education and workforce training. I’m glad both have been signed into law.

Additionally, the House passed the Black Hills National Cemetery Act, which I introduced.  The legislation would expand the Sturgis-area cemetery by 200 acres, ensuring we keep this important promise to veterans for decades to come. I’m hopeful the Senate will take up the bill soon.

This is all in addition to legislation we passed last Congress to increase mental health access for veterans and incentivize small businesses to hire those who have served.

There’s more work to do, however. I continue to fight to keep the Hot Springs VA open. There are changes that must be made to the VA CHOICE Program, which the House Veterans Affairs Committee is working very hard on.

There is no way to fully compensate our veterans for the sacrifices they’ve made, but this November, I encourage you to take a moment and personally thank one of South Dakota’s 72,000 patriots and their families. There is a price to freedom, and we can never forget that.

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Rep. Kristi Noem says the tax reform bill is a smart move for our generation

2017/11/09

Representative Kristi Noem says House Republicans introduced a tax reform package last week that she says will finally give people some breathing room.

Although congressional Republicans have moved forward with their plan to overhaul the nation's tax system by the end of the year, they still have a ways to go before it heads to the president's desk.

Noem says they are currently going through the Democrat amendments and they aren't happy with them.

She says she's looking for growth in the economy by getting people higher paying jobs and cutting rates to bring relief to their pocket books.

She says it's an ongoing debate and although they are trying to meet in the middle, she says the Democrats are only looking to cause the president to fail.

Rep. Kristi Noem says, "This is just not going to be bipartisan. They're not going to work together on something that's this important to our president, that's this important to our country and so that's why we just have to make sure that we're making the right decisions, making sure that we're putting families first, that we're putting the hardworking folks in this country first and make sure that the policy is solid, so that we go forward and really do grow our economy."

Noem says it's been 31 years since we did tax reform in this country and we have to stick to our principles.

She says she's been in tax reform meetings for years and she says the question people should be asking themselves is if they trust the government to make decisions about how to spend your money or if you should trust families to make those decisions.

She says if this bill is passed, people's paychecks will be bigger come January.

The House Ways and Means Committee voted 24-16 along party lines to send the measure to the full House. 

Democrats say it's a tax bounty for the rich.

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Tax Reform Advances with Approval from Noem's Committee

2017/11/09

Rep. Kristi Noem today joined the House Ways & Means Committee in approving the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, setting the stage for the tax reform bill to be considered by the full House in the coming weeks. The legislation, which has found support from many South Dakotans, is expected to increase wages by 3.1 percent, add nearly 1 million jobs, and raise after-tax incomes by thousands of dollars, according to the non-partisan Tax Foundation. Meanwhile, the Joint Committee on Taxation found there would be “a tax benefit to all income categories,” and the Tax Policy Center found “the legislation would reduce taxes on average for all income groups.”

“It is the privilege of a lifetime to go through this tax reform plan line by line and fight for South Dakota priorities,” said Noem. “Today is an exciting day. This is the most significant step we’ve taken toward comprehensive tax reform in more than 30 years, and I’m proud of what we’ve put forward. It’s a plan that finally respects and rewards hard work. It delivers much lower tax rates and simplifies things enough so most people won’t need an army of accountants to pay their taxes or build their business. We’re making sure everyone starts playing by the same rules and can experience the benefits of higher wages and increased job creation. I look forward to continuing this debate in the full House and remain optimistic about what this plan can do for the hardworking people of South Dakota.”

 

POLICY HIGHLIGHTS

Simplifies the tax code so an individual or family can file their taxes on a form as simple as a postcard.

 

Significantly lowers individual tax rates to Zero, 12%, 25% and 35%, while also nearly doubling the standard deduction to $24,000 for married couples and $12,000 for single filers. High-income Americans will maintain the 39.6% rate.

  • 0%: Married couples making less than $24,000 / Single filers making less than $12,000 (the increased standard deduction protects these families from taxation)
  • 12%: Married couples making $24,000-$90,000 / Single filers making $12,000-$45,000
  • 25%: Married couples making $90,000-$260,000 / Single filers making $45,000-$200,000
  • 35%: Married couples making $260,000-$1,000,000 / Single filers making $200,000-$500,000
  • 39.6%: Married couples making more than $1,000,000 / Single filers making more than $500,000

Provides unprecedented support for families:

  • Increases the Child Tax Credit to $1,600 per child (60% larger than under current policy).
  • Eliminates the “marriage penalty.”
  • Creates a new Family Flexibility Credit, which provides a credit of $300 for each parent and non-child dependent.
  • Preserves the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (also known as the Child Care Credit) to better support working parents.
  • Allows unborn children to be named beneficiaries of 529 education savings plans

Phases in full and permanent Death Tax Repeal by doubling the Death Tax exemption levels for the first seven years and then fully repealing the Death Tax by 2025.

Preserves and strengthens the Earned Income Tax Credit with provisions to stop widely reported fraud.

Gives support at important milestones in life:

  • Preserves the Home Mortgage Interest Deduction for existing mortgages and maintains the home mortgage interest deduction for newly purchased homes up to $500,000.
  • Retains popular retirement savings options, such as the 401(k)s and IRAs.
  • Streamlines higher-education benefits.

Excludes the Indian Health Service’s Student Loan Repayment program from tax to help in recruiting. It’s based on Noem’s 2016 legislation.

Continues the deduction for charitable contributions.

Allows businesses to immediately write off the full cost of new equipment, which is critical for South Dakota’s agriculture community.

Creates opportunities to create more jobs and raise wages.

  • Creates a separate and historically low small business tax rate.
  • Lowers the corporate tax rate to a globally competitive 20%.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Noem, the first South Dakotan in history to serve on the House Ways & Means Committee, has played a pivotal role in drafting the legislation that advanced today. In the process, Noem met with hundreds of South Dakotans to discuss the plan – both in the state and in her Washington, D.C. office. She also participated in more than a dozen formal Ways and Means Committee hearings on tax reform and brought South Dakota farmer Scott VanderWal to the table to testify on tax reform’s impact on agriculture. All in all, the House Ways and Means Committee has been working on this proposal for more than six years, holding more than 40 public hearings since 2011. 

You can also find examples of how certain taxpayers would be impacted by tax reform here as well as statements from South Dakotans about the plan here.

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What They are Saying about Tax Reform

2017/11/07

This is a tax reform bill built for farmers, and Rep. Noem was integral in achieving that. From significantly lower tax rates to repealing the Death Tax, the Tax Cut and Jobs Act is more fair and takes a big step toward rewarding rather than punishing hard work and success.”
- Scott VanderWal, Farmer near Volga and SD Farm Bureau President, who testified before the House Ways & Means Committee on tax reform

[Rep. Kristi Noem’s] hard work and persistence has made our progress to date possible and is our greatest asset in the serious fight to kill the Death Tax once and for all.”
- Grover Norquist, President of Americans for Tax Reform

Prairie Aquatech will benefit from this tax plan by having a lower corporate tax rate and keeping the money locally to pay employees a higher wage.  Since we are a research and development company, the R&D tax credits, interest deductions and being able to write off the cost of new equipment will help us get started as a new business….”
- Dennis Harstad, VP of Operations/GM at Prairie Aqua Tech in Brookings

"High-quality child care can help more children be prepared to succeed in life. In fact, research shows that it can help to combat the major barriers that keep 71% of young Americans from being qualified to serve in the military. With child care costs on the rise, the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit is a critical support for working families….”
- Major General Donald J. Goldhorn, U.S. Army, Retired – Castlewood, South Dakota

“The National Indian Health Board is very pleased to see that the draft House tax proposal includes a provision to make the IHS student loan repayment program tax exempt.  This common-sense provision will not only create parity with other federal health programs, but will allow IHS to stretch their scarce resources further and provide more incentives for health professionals to work for the Indian health system… NIHB expresses our sincerest appreciation to Congresswoman Noem for her commitment to getting this included in the House tax legislation.”
- Caitrin McCarron Shuy, National Indian Health Board 

“I believe that the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act will help small businesses like mine invest in more equipment, develop better processes, and compete better in the global market which will, in turn, result in more opportunities for employment as we grow and invest in our future.”
- Robb Peterson, President at Glacial Lakes Rubber & Plastics LLC in Watertown 

“Tax reform is absolutely necessary to ensure that ‘family’ remains the cornerstone of our South Dakota farms and ranches now and for generations to come. Congresswoman Noem’s personal family farm experiences coupled with her position and influence on the Ways and Means Committee lend real life experience to the tax issues such as Estate Tax and Like Kind Exchanges that can be life changing for South Dakota farmers and ranchers.”
- Jerry Schmitz, President of the South Dakota Soybean Association 

“Molded Fiber Glass Companies supports the proposed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act bill and sees it as a positive step in helping US, and in particular, South Dakota-based businesses, become more competitive with foreign-based businesses.  We also see it as having a very positive impact on Middle Class families which make up our workforce.” 
- David Giovannini, Sr. Vice President at Molded Fiber Glass Companies in Aberdeen 

“The simplification of the filing requirements, the elimination of the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), and modification of the estate tax will take out a lot of the pain, shock, anger, and frustration that Americans feel about their taxes.”
- Casey Peterson, Founder and Shareholder at Casey Peterson LTD CPAs and Financial Advisors 

“Due to the bill’s provisions that will dramatically improve the competitiveness of US-based corporations (including the immediate and permanent 20% tax rate) and encourage US economic growth and investment, 3M supports H.R. 1 and urges its reporting from the Committee during this week’s markup….”
– 3M with facilities in Brookings and Aberdeen 

“Every dollar is critical to the small business owner in South Dakota, especially those who are just starting out.  So any progress towards meaningful tax reform for the small business owner is welcome.”
- Jeff Eckhoff, State Director of the South Dakota Small Business Development Center 

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Noem's Committee Begins Formal Consideration of Tax Reform Bill

2017/11/06

Rep. Kristi Noem today joined the House Ways & Means Committee as they began formal consideration of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. According to the non-partisan Tax Foundation, the tax reform proposal – which Noem played a pivotal role in drafting – would increase wages by 3.1 percent, add nearly 1 million jobs, and raise the after-tax income of the average middle-income family.

For the latest information, please visit Noem.House.gov/TaxReform. To watch the proceedings live, please visit WaysAndMeans.House.gov/Live.

“It’s taken decades to get to this point, but it’s essential we get this right,” said Noem. “For the next week, we’ll be going through the bill line by line, making sure it reflects our priorities of building strong families and a strong future for all Americans. We’re committed to lowering tax rates, expanding pro-family credits, and creating a tax code that respects and rewards hard work. In return, taxpayers will see wages rise and job creation boom. After years of stagnation, it’s critical we act now. I’m eager to finish our committee work on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act so full House consideration can begin.”

Noem was selected for the House Ways and Means Committee in January 2015. Just over a year later, the committee released a blueprint for tax reform that outlined what a pro-growth, pro-family tax plan would look like. Over the course of the next year, Rep. Noem sat down with hundreds of South Dakotans to discuss the plan – both in the state and in her Washington, D.C. office. Noem also participated in more than a dozen formal Ways and Means Committee hearings on tax reform and brought South Dakota farmer Scott VanderWal to the table to testify on tax reform’s impact on agriculture.

All in all, the House Ways and Means Committee has been working on this proposal for more than six years, holding more than 40 public hearings since 2011.

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S.D. delegates tout GOP tax bill, promise savings for middle class

2017/11/03

South Dakota's Congressional delegates trumpeted the release of a $1.51 trillion GOP tax reform plan Thursday, saying it would save most South Dakotans thousands of dollars each year while also boosting business in the state and across the country.

In statements to and calls with reporters, Rep. Kristi Noem and Sens. John Thune and Mike Rounds celebrated the proposal, which would cut taxes for corporations and lower tax burdens for low- and middle-class Americans.

“I’m proud that this bill lowers rates for everyone," Noem said. "We've focused on the low- and middle-income folks that are in South Dakota and across our country."

The bill comes with a $1.51 trillion price tag over the next decade, which Republicans said would be reduced as taxpayers and corporations reinvest their savings in purchases or business expansions, boosting the economy. 

Democrats and a handful of skeptical Republicans voiced concerns about the proposal's tax cuts for businesses and wealthy Americans, arguing that it wouldn't do enough to help low- and middle-income people.

"This bill stresses more tax cuts for corporations and wealthy people than for the middle class," said Sam Parkinson, executive director of the South Dakota Democratic Party. "We think Republicans in Congress should be working with every member to find solutions."

House Republicans said they felt confident the measure would pass in that chamber later this month. The Senate plans to draft its own tax reform bill which would be combined with the House proposal in a conference committee.

"We have taken the first step with the introduction of this bill in promising that we are going to fix this," Rounds said. "I’m very happy that they’ve gotten this far on it."

Some of the changes proposed in the Republican plan:

- A consolidation of tax brackets from seven to three, with individual rates of 12, 25 and 35 percent. Earners in the highest bracket wouldn't pay more than 39.6 percent on their earnings

- Child tax credits would grow to $1,600 from $1,000. Additional $300 credits would be applicable for each parent, older family member or nonchild dependent

- Mortgage interest deductions will remain, but future purchases will be capped at $500,000

- The estate tax, imposed on estates worth more than $5 million, would be phased out over six years

- Corporate tax rates would from 35 percent to 20 percent and new companies would be able to write off new investments immediately

- Small business owners would see their tax rates drop to 25 percent

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Tax Reform: Strong Families. A Strong Future.

2017/11/03

I met a woman a while back in the grocery store. She had a cart full of groceries and a handful of coupons. As we waited in line, she asked: “Kristi, when is it going to get better?” The cost of those groceries, of healthcare, of childcare – all were going up. But she hadn’t gotten a raise in years.

I’ve been thinking about that young woman a lot lately. She, like so many South Dakota families, faces that financial pinch every day. When will it get better? Earlier this month, we released a once-in-a-generation tax reform package that I’m optimistic will begin to answer that question.

The bill – appropriately named the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act – is designed to strengthen families and offer a more optimistic future for all Americans. More specifically, we significantly lower individual tax rates and nearly double the standard deduction. We also simplify the tax code so an individual or family can file their taxes on a form as simple as a postcard. Think of the stress that would save come tax time!

We also provide unprecedented support for families, increasing the Child Tax Credit to $1,600 per child, eliminating the marriage penalty, preserving the Child Care Credit, and creating a new Family Flexibility Credit.

The Death Tax is fully and completely repealed by 2024, and we double the exemption between now and then. Farmers and ranchers, along with other businesses, will be able to immediately write off the full cost of new equipment, which is critical for agriculture. No changes are made to popular retirement savings options, such as the 401(k) or IRA. And we open the door for employers to create more jobs and raise wages by offering a historically low small business tax rate and lowering the corporate tax rate to a globally competitive 20 percent.

I know I just threw a lot of numbers at you, so let me explain what it would mean for a typical family. Imagine this: Phil and Kate have two children in middle school. She works at the bank in town; he works for an area farmer. Together, they make $59,000 a year. As a result of the lower tax rates, a significantly larger standard deduction, an enhanced Child Tax Credit and the new Family Flexibility Credit, Phil and Kate would see their total tax bill drop from $1,582 to $400. That’s more money they can use for whatever is important to them, whether it’s paying bills, buying a new fridge, or putting away savings for the future.

Let’s look at another example. Meet Beth. Two years ago, she opened Beth’s Pizza Place. This year, she expects to earn around $62,000 in net income. Under today’s tax code, Beth would pay a little over $8,600 in taxes, but under our plan, her tax bill would fall by more than $3,000, freeing up money to install a new oven or give her employees a little raise.

While nothing will be perfect in everyone’s eyes, I’m optimistic about the impact this package could make in the lives of South Dakotans, including that woman I met in the grocery store. It’s taken years to get to his point, but it’s essential we get this right. For kids about to graduate from college, this could be the tax code they live by for much of their adult lives.

As the first South Dakotan in history to serve on the committee that’s responsible for tax reform, I’m deeply honored to give our state a seat at this table. I was talking with President Trump just after we introduced the bill. His optimism about our plan and commitment to getting it done was beyond encouraging.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will be debated in my committee for a few more weeks before the full House votes on it. If you’d like to follow along or share your thoughts on it, please visit Noem.House.gov/TaxReform

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Noem: Tax Reform Means Stronger Families and a Stronger Future

2017/11/02

Rep. Kristi Noem today announced the release of a once-in-a-generation tax reform package which aims to strengthen families and offer a stronger future for all Americans. The legislation was drafted by the House Ways and Means Committee, on which Rep. Noem is the first South Dakotan in history to serve. For the latest information, please visit Noem.House.gov/TaxReform

“People deserve a break,” said Noem. “For years, we’ve watched as energy, food, healthcare and child care costs increased, but people’s paychecks remained largely unchanged. Small businesses have had a hard time expanding in that type of environment, and families have struggled to achieve the degree of financial independence they’re aiming for. In order for America to move beyond this, we need a tax code designed to strengthen our families and offer a more optimistic future. While no proposal will be perfect in everyone’s eyes, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act would make the tax code much more simple and fair, delivering family-friendly credits, lower tax rates, small business incentives, and, ultimately, a full and permanent repeal of the Death Tax. It’s taken years to get to this point, but I’m encouraged by the progress and look forward to continuing this debate in upcoming committee meetings.”

The tax reform package released today would:

  • Substantially simplify the tax code so an individual or family can file their taxes on a form as simple as a postcard.
  • Significantly lower individual tax rates for low- and middle-income Americans to Zero, 12%, 25% and 35%. High-income Americans will maintain the 39.6% rate.
    • 0%: Married couples making less than $24,000 / Single filers making less than $12,000 (the increased standard deduction protects these families from taxation)
    • 12%: Married couples making $24,000-$90,000 / Single filers making $12,000-$45,000
    • 25%: Married couples making $90,000-$260,000 / Single filers making $45,000-$200,000
    • 35%: Married couples making $260,000-$1,000,000 / Single filers making $200,000-$500,000
    • 39.6%: Married couples making more than $1,000,000 / Single filers making more than $500,000
  • Nearly double the standard deduction to $24,000 for married couples and $12,000 for single filers.
  • Provide unprecedented support for families.
    • Increases the Child Tax Credit to $1,600 per child (60% larger than under current policy).
    • Eliminates the “marriage penalty.”
    • Creates a new Family Flexibility Credit, which provides a credit of $300 for each parent and non-child dependent.
    • Preserves the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (also known as the Child Care Credit) to better support working parents.
  • Phase in full and permanent Death Tax Repeal by doubling the Death Tax exemption levels for the first six years and then fully repealing the Death Tax by 2024.
  • Preserve and strengthen the Earned Income Tax Credit with provisions to stop widely reported fraud.
  • Preserve the Home Mortgage Interest Deduction for existing mortgages and maintains the home mortgage interest deduction for newly purchased homes up to $500,000.
  • Retain popular retirement savings options, such as the 401(k)s and Individual Retirement Accounts.
  • Streamline higher-education benefits.
  • Continue the deduction for charitable contributions.
  • Exclude the Indian Health Service’s Student Loan Repayment program from tax to help in recruiting. It’s based on Noem’s 2016 legislation.
  • Allow businesses to immediately write off the full cost of new equipment, which is critical for South Dakota’s agriculture community.
  • Create a separate and historically low small business tax rate.
  • Lower the corporate tax rate to a globally competitive 20%.

Noem was selected for the House Ways and Means Committee in January 2015. Just over a year later, the committee released a blueprint for tax reform that outlined what a pro-growth, pro-family tax plan would look like. Over the course of the next year, Rep. Noem sat down with hundreds of South Dakotans to discuss the plan – both in the state and in her Washington, D.C. office. Noem also participated in more than a dozen formal Ways and Means Committee hearings on tax reform and brought South Dakota farmer Scott VanderWal to the table to testify on tax reform’s impact on agriculture.

All in all, the House Ways and Means Committee has been working on this proposal for more than six years, holding more than 40 public hearings since 2011.

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SD Republicans show support for tax reform

2017/11/02

South Dakota’s three congressional delegates are all aboard with the latest Republican tax reform plan.

Aside from the wealthiest Americans, who would see their individual tax rates maintained at 39.6 percent under a plan unveiled Thursday, U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem said the “once-in-a-generation” reform effort would help reduce rates for lower- and middle-class Americans.

Noem, a House Ways and Means Committee member, spoke in a media call shortly after her committee released the draft bill Thursday morning. The plan would lower the total of individual tax rates from seven to four. Rates were proposed at 12 percent, 25 percent, 35 percent and 39.6 percent. Another bracket would be set at zero percent for married couples making less than $24,000 and single-filers making less than $12,000.

In her initial statement, Noem attempted to isolate the ways she believes this plan would benefit everyday South Dakotans. Noem spoke of a woman she met in a grocery story who asked, “When is it going to get better?” Noem said the coupon-wielding shopper spoke of the economic peril she’s faced, and the congresswoman said the woman’s concerns have remained in her mind since.

It’s this tax reform plan Noem said would benefit folks like the mother she met in Watertown.

“Quite honestly, we need to make our tax code better for families like hers,” Noem said.

The tax reform package would also phase in the repeal of the estate tax, aiming for a full repeal in 2024, and preserve the 401(k) savings option. And as Republicans have promised throughout tax reform talks, the plan would simplify the tax code so a person could file their taxes on a form as small as a postcard.

But the plan isn’t loved by all South Dakotans.

The corporate tax rate would drop drastically under the plan, from 35 percent to 20 percent, a benefit to the wealthy that didn’t jive with the priorities of the South Dakota Democratic Party.

SDDP Executive Director Sam Parkinson called the House Republican bill a “massive tax cut” for the wealthy and big corporations, and said it would end up “blowing a big hole in the deficit.”

“We urge Rep. Kristi Noem and Senators Thune and Rounds to vote against this awful plan, and work with Democrats to develop a tax plan that works for everyone, not just the wealthy and large corporations.”

On Thursday, South Dakota’s longest-tenured congressional delegate also offered input on the House Ways and Means Committee’s reform framework.

U.S. Sen. John Thune, a Republican like Noem, sees the reform effort as a means to “fix” a tax code that hasn’t been altered for decades.

“Through comprehensive tax reform, we will be able to provide Americans with more jobs, fairer taxes and bigger paychecks,” Thune said in a written statement released Thursday. “... I look forward to continuing to work with our colleagues in the House to deliver a final pro-growth tax reform package to President Trump’s desk for his signature.”

And for U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds, it’s about time to overhaul the tax code. By cutting the corporate tax rate, Rounds said, average household income could rise $4,000 per year. If the bill makes it through the House, Rounds said the plan is a good starting point for a Senate response to the proposed legislation.

“We’re really happy to the fact that they’re basically real close to being on time with it, and that allows us the opportunity to actually review it, make recommendations and come up with our modifications, and hopefully make it better than it is already,” Rounds said.

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South Dakota is leading the charge against the Death Tax

2017/11/02

The next few weeks will be a pivotal time in the debate regarding tax reform, and especially the future of the 101- year- old Death Tax. The Mount Rushmore state has been a leader on this issue since 2001. That year, South Dakota voters repealed the state’s Death Tax by an overwhelming 80% of the vote. Not coincidently, the Estate Tax later proved to be a driving force in the election of Senator John Thune, when it was a cornerstone of his campaign in his 2004 victory over incumbent Senator Tom Daschle.

South Dakota continues to lead the nation’s effort to repeal this tax, championed in the House by Congresswoman Kristi Noem (HR 631) and in the U.S. Senate by Mr. Thune (S 205). Their effort may finally be on the precipice of a major win for family farms, businesses, and their employees. The win – the repeal of this destructive tax – would represent a major leap forward in the economic prospects for both South Dakota and the nation.

According to the American Business Defense Council, 79% of South Dakotans agree that Death Tax repeal will save hundreds of farms and small business in South Dakota alone. Seventy-six percent of South Dakotans want the Death Tax completely repealed, while only 18% oppose its’ repeal. Seventy-Five percent are also concerned that the life insurance industry is spending millions in lobbying to keep the estate tax.

From a national standpoint, America’s estate tax is the fourth-highest in the world. Russia, China, Canada, Mexico, Sweden and Norway are among the many nations which have repealed their Death Taxes. Congress’ Joint Economic Committee found that the death tax has destroyed roughly $1.1 trillion in capital stock in the economy. Lost capital means fewer trucks, smaller tractors, fewer combines, and less agricultural technology. It also means fewer jobs and lower wages.

Should repeal occur, it will be largely because of South Dakota’s Congressional leadership at the forefront of this issue, as they fight for the state and national economy. This opportunity to repeal the death tax is critical for our farms and businesses that continue to provide for our families, South Dakota and the United States of America.

During the Thune vs. Daschle Senate race, Vernell Johnson, South Dakota’s famed auctioneer and author said, “I’ve sold too many of South Dakota’s farms in the last four decades because a family member died. It’s time to get rid of the Death Tax once and for all.” I think that says it all.

Dick Patten is the President of the American Business Defense Council and a noted business leader and speaker.

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House Rep. Kristi Noem joins tax reform

2017/11/02

Noem says she hopes to reinforce the mortgage interest rate deduction, the childcare tax credit, the family tax credit, keeping those things going and expand upon them. She says she also intends to create more jobs and higher paying jobs.

Kristi Noem says, "I'm also thrilled that this bill repeals the death tax because it is an unfair tax, it's a double tax and it's Un-American. We also make sure we keep important provisions for agriculture in South Dakota small businesses like interest deduction. We give them an expensing tool and we lower the small business rate down to 25%"

With passage in the House, the legislation will next be debated in the U.S. Senate.

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Noem, House Republicans unveil tax reform package

2017/11/02

U.S. Representative Kristi Noem says a chance meeting with a woman in a South Dakota grocery store stuck with her as she worked on the House tax reform package announced Thursday.

The woman complained about having trouble making ends meet.

"She was in the forefront of my mind as we worked on the details of this package - the lower rates for everybody, the simplicity, the mortgage interest rate deduction, the family tax credit.."

As member of the House Ways and Means Committee that put the proposed package together, Noem played a prominent part in the big announcement on Capitol Hill. 

The tax reform plan also includes the eventual death of the estate tax and Noem got personal again, sharing the oft-repeated story about what happened when her farmer father suddenly died when she was just a teenager.

"I could not believe that the federal government would come to a family that had already paid taxes on all that income and say that because you had a tragedy, now you have to pay again."

This biggest reform package in decades - $1.5 Trillion - is supposed to lower most individual and business tax rates and make doing your taxes so simple that you could use a form the size of a post card. House Speaker Paul Ryan held up a post card for emphasis, during Thursday's announcement.

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Noem: Black Hills to Benefit from New House-Passed Forestry Provisions

2017/11/01

Rep. Kristi Noem today joined the House in passing H.R.2936, the Resilient Federal Forests Act, which pairs a responsible budget fix with targeted forest management reforms to dramatically improve the health and resiliency of the nation’s forests.

“The years-long pine beetle epidemic has turned much of the Black Hills into a tinder box,” said Noem. “We are fortunate to have so many dedicated foresters working in this area, and I’m proud to have scored some critical victories in support of their efforts over the years. The Resilient Federal Forests Act would put additional tools at their disposal. With the House’s stamp of approval, I strongly urge the Senate to take the legislation up quickly and allow these critical resources to be deployed.”

“Hill City School District is extremely grateful to see an extension of Secure Rural Schools through passage of the Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017,” said Mike Hanson, Hill City Superintendent. “Our school district receives no state aid and is heavily impacted through federally owned acres. The loss of Secure Rural School dollars requires the district to increase the use of reserve funds in our operational budget as well as look at cost reductions that may have a negative impact on student learning. This extension of Secure Rural Schools allows our district to continue providing the best educational opportunities for our federally connected students! We wish to thank all members of the House who voted for this Act and especially South Dakota Representative Kristi Noem! Your leadership and dedication makes a powerful impact on our nation’s public schools!”

“This is a great news for many schools in the Black Hills,” said Mark Naugle, Custer Superintendent. “This legislation will help to make up for the decrease in revenue from local timber harvesting.  It will also help to offset the impact of Federal ownership of property in local school districts.  Custer School District would like to thank Representative Noem, and Senators Thune and Rounds, for supporting provisions which help our school districts.”

The bipartisan Resilient Federal Forests Act would, among other things:

  • Permanently solve the wildfire “borrowing problem. Without authorizing new spending, the bill provides a fiscally responsible solution to end fire “borrowing” (the practice of transferring funds from forest management to firefighting, which increases the risk of wildfires). It does so by allowing FEMA to transfer funds to the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management.
  • Eliminate paperwork. The legislation would reduce duplicative paperwork for forest management projects by allowing National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) exclusions, as long as the project is consistent with existing forest plans.
  • Address obstructionist litigation. To promote the quick resolution of litigation against forest management projects, the bill would create a new arbitration pilot program that would require litigants opposing a forest management activity to come to the table with an alternative proposal rather than just saying “no.”
  • Bolster tribal participation in forest health projects. Under the bill, we would expand authorities for tribes to manage adjacent national forests to reduce the risk of wildfire, insects and disease.
  • Support local governments and modernize the Secure Rural Schools & Community Self-Determination Act. With an updated Secure Rural Schools provision, schools in counties like Custer, Fall River, Lawrence, Meade and Pennington would have greater flexibility in how they choose to use these critical funds.

With passage in the House, the legislation will next be debated in the U.S. Senate.

Noem has long been an advocate for provisions to increase the health of South Dakota’s forests as well as a champion of modernizing the Secure Rural Schools provisions. In November 2013, Noem brought U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell to view the pine beetle epidemic’s damage first hand. Months later, policies Noem helped write were included in the Farm Bill and became law. This included provisions to cut through environmental red tape, get boots on the ground faster, and allow the Forest Service to work on the scale this epidemic required. Around 1 million acres of the Black Hills National Forest benefited from the reforms. In May 2017, Noem welcomed U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue to the state as well to visit the Black Hills National Forest, among other locations, and discuss outstanding needs.

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Questions from My Latest Town Hall

2017/10/27

It often goes unreported, but the House has passed more than 250 bills this year, many following through on the conservative priorities I’ve been discussing for nearly a decade. These 250 House-passed bills include the repeal and replacement of Obamacare, resources for President Trump’s border wall proposal, protections for unborn children, VA reform, and a rollback of numerous Obama-era regulations.

More than 50 of these bills have become law, including many regulatory repeals and national-security legislation I wrote to bring more women into peace negotiations. Others, such as Obamacare repeal, continue to be debated in the Senate. This was the opening report I gave at a recent town hall in Mobridge – one in a series of town halls and telephone town halls I’ve done in recent months.

After that initial report came questions. The first was from Carson, a senior at Mobridge-Pollock High School. He wanted to know what had been done on the issue of abortion. I talked to him about how I helped introduce legislation that would define life as beginning at conception. While we haven’t had the opportunity to vote on that specific provision yet, the House did recently pass the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, which bans abortions after 20 weeks (the point at which studies indicate babies can feel pain). We were also able to get legislation signed into law this year that would empower states to withhold family-planning funds from organizations like Planned Parenthood.

The next question came from Jayden, who was wondering what I thought of President Trump. I explained that I was pleased the president was strong on national security, which is his number one job. President Trump also campaigned on building a wall on the southern border, repealing Obamacare, and reforming the tax code – all of which are priorities that I share. Additionally, he put a pro-life Supreme Court justice on the bench, which was a huge accomplishment.

Then, a Navy veteran from the area asked about the inefficiency that happens in many government-run agencies. I’m incredibly grateful for this man’s service and believe his concerns are well founded. I’ve fought this kind of inefficiency and waste many times, including through my CUFF Act. This legislation, which has passed the House and is awaiting action in the Senate, would stop certain Social Security benefits from going to people wanted for felonies and parole violations.

The grand finale question came from a young woman interested in my thoughts on unions. South Dakota is a “Right to Work” state, which means individuals can’t be required to join unions or be forced to pay for union dues as a condition of employment (something that’s required in other states). I think “Right to Work” is the right approach.

I was grateful to everyone who made it to my town hall in Mobridge, and I hope to either see you at one in the near future or talk with you during one of my upcoming telephone town halls. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to visit one of my offices, give us a call, or send me an email. To get the location of the office nearest you, please visit my website: noem.house.gov

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Noem Applauds Trump's Actions to Address Opioid Epidemic

2017/10/26

Rep. Kristi Noem today applauded President Donald Trump’s declaration of a nationwide Public Health Emergency to address the opioid crisis. The announcement, according to the White House, allows for expanded access to telemedicine service, temporary appointments of specialists needed to respond effectively to our nation’s health emergency, dislocated worker grants, and shifting of resources to better help individuals receive substance abuse treatment.

“FBI reports indicate the rate of violent crime in South Dakota nearly doubled between 2005 and 2015,” said Noem. “While there are a number of conditions that can contribute to a surge that severe, many agree drugs have played a big role. No community – no family – is immune to addiction. Particularly with opioids, it can often start with a simple prescription for pain medication to deal with a headache. But that same medicine you took to heal can be the drug that leads to a life-altering addiction. I’m encouraged by President Trump’s commitment to addressing this crisis, and I look forward to working closely with him and his administration to keep our communities safer and drug free.”

Last Congress, Noem helped pass two major bills to fight the opioid crisis: the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act and the 21st Century Cures Act, both of which were signed into law.  Among other things, the legislation puts private- and public-sector experts on the case to identify best practices for pain management.

To follow up on those new laws, Noem has thrown her support behind a series of bills in this Congress to combat the growing drug crisis, including:

  • H.R.2857, Supporting Families in Substance Abuse Treatment Act, (Introduced by Noem; Passed House June 20, 2017), which aims to strengthen a state or tribe’s ability to keep families together through the parent’s drug addiction treatment, if that’s what’s right for the child and for the parent’s treatment.
  • H.R.2834, the Partnership Grants to Strengthen Families Affected by Parental Substance Abuse Act (Cosponsored by Noem; Passed House June 20, 2017), which strengthens the Regional Partnership Grant program, a program that provides funding to state and regional grantees to provide evidence-based services to prevent child abuse and neglect related to substance abuse.
  • H.R.1741, Transnational Criminal Organization Illicit Spotter Prevention and Elimination Act (Cosponsored by Noem), which makes it illegal to “spot” for drug traffickers at the border. Without this change, helping drug traffickers avoid law enforcement when crossing the U.S.-Mexico border (known as “spotting”) is not an enforceable offense.
  • H.R.22, Support More Assets, Resources, and Technology on the Border Act (Cosponsored by Noem), which authorizes the deployment of additional personnel and new technologies to secure the border. This includes an authorization for as many as 10,000 additional members of the National Guard to be deployed to the border.
  • H.R.1057, Synthetics Trafficking and Overdose Prevention Act (Cosponsored by Noem), which is designed to help stop dangerous synthetic drugs like fentanyl and carfentanil from being shipped through our borders to drug traffickers in the U.S.
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Contact Information

1323 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-2801
Fax 202-225-5823
noem.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Ways and Means

U.S. Representative Kristi Noem is a wife, mother, experienced rancher, farmer, and former small business owner. Kristi was born and raised in rural Hamlin County in northeastern South Dakota and still lives there today with her husband, Bryon, and their three children, Kassidy, Kennedy, and Booker.

Kristi learned the value of hard work early in life from her father. He put Kristi, her sister and two brothers to work on the family farm at a young age caring for the cattle and horses and helping with planting and harvest. After graduating from high school, Kristi began attending college at Northern State University in Aberdeen. When her father died unexpectedly in a farming accident, Kristi returned to the family farm and ranch full-time. Her father’s death left a huge absence, so Kristi stepped up and helped stabilize the operation and provided leadership when it was needed most.

Kristi’s work on the farm and ranch didn’t go unnoticed. In 1997 she received the South Dakota Outstanding Young Farmer award and in 2003 she was honored with the South Dakota Young Leader award.

Kristi’s experience as a small business owner shaped her understanding of government and its purpose. Too often, government is inefficient and ineffective, simply getting in the way of small businesses and entrepreneurs who wish to create jobs and grow our economy. Realizing this, Kristi decided to get involved to try and make a difference.

Her service includes the South Dakota State Farm Agency State Committee, the Commission for Agriculture in the 21st Century, the South Dakota Soybean Association, and numerous other boards and committees. In the fall of 2006, Kristi was elected as the 6th District Representative to the South Dakota House of Representatives.

Kristi quickly realized she could serve her district, and the State of South Dakota, more effectively in a leadership position. So in her second term she ran for, and won, the position of Assistant Majority Leader in the State House, where she served until 2010.

Kristi was first elected to serve as South Dakota’s lone Member of the U.S. House of Representatives on November 2, 2010.

While keeping up with her Congressional duties in Washington, D.C. and work with constituents in South Dakota, Kristi continued to take undergraduate courses from South Dakota State University. In December 2011, Kristi graduated from SDSU with her Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science.

On November 6, 2012, Kristi was re-elected to the U.S. House of Representatives where she continues to serve on the Agriculture Committee and House Armed Services Committee.

Kristi enjoys helping her daughters compete in rodeo and 4-H. She has been a 4-H leader for 14 years. Kristi is also an avid hunter. She particularly enjoys pheasant hunting on the homestead and archery elk with her brothers.


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