Kevin McCarthy

Kevin McCarthy

CALIFORNIA's 23rd DISTRICT

A Visit With Our Future Leaders

2014/09/30

Annapolis, MD - Today, Congressman Kevin McCarthy traveled to the United States Naval Academy (USNA) in Annapolis, Maryland where he visited with eleven midshipmen all of whom the Congressman nominated for attendance. Prior to joining the entire USNA Brigade for lunch in the dining hall, Congressman McCarthy met with USNA Superintendent, Vice Admiral Ted Carter to discuss the important role service academies play in shaping our nation’s future leaders. Admiral Carter and Leader McCarthy discussed the future of the U.S. Navy, and the contributions the Academy is making in preparing these future officers for challenges facing our national security. On a lighter note, the Admiral previewed the outlook of the storied football program for the remainder of the year to Congressman McCarthy.   Congressman McCarthy released the following statement after his visit:   “It was with great pride to visit so many future leaders from our community at the United States Naval Academy. It is a true honor and serious responsibility as a Member of Congress to nominate our students to attend our service academies. America is a nation that must always lead in an increasingly dangerous world, and the students at our service academies will be integral in defending our nation. It is comforting to know that so many of our neighbors will serve in these efforts. I look forward to helping future classes of our emerging leaders follow their dream to some of our nation’s finest institutions.”     ### Read More

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy: On how an early lunch at Luigi's reflects the can-do spirit of Bakersfield and the great Central Valley of California

2014/09/27

Bakersfield Observed September 27, 2014 http://www.bakersfieldobserved.com/2014/09/house-majority-leader-kevin-mccarthy-on.html Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield and House Majority Leader, gives us his weekly view from Capitol Hill. In his words:  "Several weeks ago a few East Coast journalists visited Bakersfield to report on a city and region that is unique to a state widely known for its relaxed lifestyle over gritty word ethic. Upon hearing of their trip, I immediately made a reservation at Luigi’s for Saturday morning to show them some true local flavor. That weekend when we pulled up and met the group outside they were sweating from a long walk in the hot sun. 'We had to park three blocks away!' I recall them saying. When we entered, the dining room was bustling with staff carrying plates of pasta and steak and patrons cramming into the long center tables to accommodate their expansive parties. For the out-of-towners, this more resembled a 1 p.m. restaurant scene than 11:15 am.  "I tell this story because this disparity was brought up during our meal. Why, our visitors thought, were we (and seemingly everyone else in town) eating steak before noon? I said it was simple; our community has been up working since sunrise. That is how it’s been for generations.   "It is this can-do attitude that yields more than just large appetites. Since our ancestors settled in the Central Valley long ago, we have become the nation’s food basket and major supplier of energy - powering communities across the country. We have developed into a community of explorers, pushing the limits of space travel and aerospace capabilities ever since the sound barrier was broken in the Mojave Desert in 1947. One needs to look no further than our community as an example of American exceptionalism.   "But achieving such positive influence in our society has not been without its challenges. The current drought is historic and is creating immense hardship on our communities. Oil wells that have operated safely for years and have employed our neighbors are now in question by regulators. But it is in the face of this adversity when we are at our best.   "New technologies have opened up diverse energy sources to power our state while they have also led to more efficient and productive conventional energy development than ever before. And our farms have adopted water conservation practices that use only what is needed while still producing the majority of nuts, fruits, and vegetables that are consumed throughout the country.   "While we respond to challenges the way we always have - through resilience - the Federal and state government are poised to implement more regulations that erase our gains and present near impossible barriers to overcome. In today’s growing governmental bureaucracy, the limits of these rules and regulations are getting wider and more ambiguous than ever were intended when originally passed by Congress.   "In Washington, the House of Representatives has passed numerous bills that limit the expansion of regulations that will especially hurt communities like ours, and instead returns responsibility to states and communities. A desk in Washington doesn’t know what is best for our community. Only our community knows what is best and that is why I will continue to fight for these common sense solutions that have proven results.   "With the spirit of our community coupled with policies that don’t put fish above people, don't force unattainable regulations on small businesses, and don't force the shutdown of oil wells over unfounded science, Bakersfield is poised for continued times of prosperity. If there is any question, just go to lunch around 11 am."   ### Read More

We applaud decison on elderberry beetle

2014/09/26

  While the City of Porterville is not ready to stop watering its elderberry mitigation project along Highway 190 east of town any time soon, the news that Tulare County has been removed as a habitat area for the Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle is certainly welcome news.   The beetle is include on the federal list of threatened species and because the beetle thrives on the elderberry bush, it too is protected. For about a decade the city has had to maintain a project where it plants elderberry bushes for every bush removed. City manager John Lollis said the city has spent a million dollars on the project and that figure does not take into account the hundreds of thousands of dollars spent by private developers who had to come up with their own mitigation plans.   Last week, the U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife made two announcements. The first is that it was removing the counties of Tulare, Kern and Fresno as habitat areas for the beetle and second, that it was suspending its efforts to delist the bug from the threatened list. The action to remove the counties from the habitat range was the direct result of efforts by Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Bakersfield) who became concerned with the impact the bug and the bush by the same name were having on both the city and developments in Porterville.   The beetle was added to the threatened list in 1980, but in 2006 a review of that list recommended delisting the beetle. In 2010, a petition was filed to remove any beetle-critical habitat designations.   In its announcement last week, the Fish and Wildlife service did not explain why it was dropping efforts to delist the beetle, but we would encourage the effort to continue. The beetle and bush have been a thorn in the side of progress for far too long and the city’s mitigation project is a waste of taxpayers’ money. The bush can be found almost anywhere along the river and most of those bushes are doing far better than those the city is paying to keep alive.     ### Read More

County no longer in elderberry beetle habitat range

2014/09/22

No one is ready to stop watering the score of elderberry bushes the city has planted at its elderberry mitigation site, but on Tuesday the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced that Tulare, Kern and Kings counties are no longer in the habitat range of the Valley Longhorn Elderberry Beetle. The beetle is a threatened species and because of that the city has had to take mitigating measures any time an elderberry bush is destroyed. City manager John Lollis said the city has spent more than a million dollars over the last decade on its mitigation project off of Highway 190 east of town. U.S. Rep. Kevin McCarthy said the action by the federal agency means an end to the measures cities have had to take, but Lollis said he is not ready to pull the plug on the mitigation project or any other actions the city has taken regarding the bush and the beetle. “Today’s decision provides needed relief to our local communities that have been forced to expend precious resources to protect a species that is not even located in our region. With the removal of Elderberry Beetle regulatory mandates from our local area, our communities can continue to focus on creating jobs rather than endure unnecessary and onerous environmental regulations,” said McCarthy, the majority leader in the House of Representatives. While the three counties were removed from the habitat, the FWS said it was withdrawing its proposal to delist the elderberry beetle as a threatened species. “It is unfortunate that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has withdrawn its own proposal to delist the Valley Longhorn Elderberry Beetle as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act,” commented McCarthy. “I strongly encourage the Fish and Wildlife Service not to withdraw this proposal and to reopen the public comment period so that constituents from other areas affected can provide the most up-to-date facts that show this species has recovered.” The bush and the beetle that thrives on it has been a roadblock to countless projects over the years. The city had to do a study on how it will mitigate any loss of elderberry bushes with its project to widen the Jaye Street bridge. Lollis said the city has agreed to plant 60 new bushes, at a cost of $5,000 a bush. He said he has been in contact with McCarthy’s office and is hopeful some guidelines will be forthcoming from the Fish and Wildlife Service. “I think it’s going to take some time to work with Fish and Wildlife,” he said, adding, “I’m not ready to torch the preserve.” He did say it appears the news for any projects proposed from now moving forward, but is skeptical it will have any impact on existing projects, such as the Jaye Street bridge. The Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle was listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act in 1980. In 2006, a five-year species review recommended delisting the beetle and in 2010 a petition was field to remove any beetle critical habitat designations. The effort to delist the beetle continued until this latest announcement. On June 10 of this year McCarthy, California State Senator Jean Fuller and California Assemblywoman Connie Conway sent a letter to FWS Director Daniel Ashe calling on the Service to act on its own recommendation by finalizing its proposal to delist the Elderberry Beetle as a threatened species. Also, McCarthy secured language in the Fiscal Year 2015 Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Appropriations Act (H.R. 5171) that would prevent FWS from withdrawing its proposal to delist the Elderberry Beetle and encourages them to delist this species. The legislation is pending. Just last month the city agreed to a $108,000 three-year contract for Sequoia Riverlands Trust to manage the 7-acre mitigation site. The beetle is a medium-sized, red and dark green insect that is one-half to one-inch long with arching long antennae. It is found only in the Central Valley and depends solely on elderberry shrubs (Sambucus) for food and shelter. Read More

Taft's famous Sandy Creek back in the spotlight

2014/09/22

Sandy Creek, the dry wash that bisects the community of Taft, was brought up on the floor of the United States House of Representatives Tuesday. Congressman Kevin McCarthy used the controversial ditch as an example of federal regulations hamstringing business and economic growth as he spoke in favor of a house resolution called the Waters of the United States Regulatory Overreach Protection Act of 2014. H.R. 5078, as it is known, was drafted in response to concerns that the Environmental Protection Agency could declare even dry streams bodies of water and place them under their regulatory control. McCarthy, now the Houser Majority leader, has dealt with Sandy Creek before. As a freshman in the California Assembly, he helped the City of Taft avoid construction of a costly water treatment plant for wastewater that was going into Sandy Creek. That was one a along list pof problems that began when Sandy Creek was declared a “navigable waterway” by the United States Army Corp of engineers. Tuesday, he spoke again about regulations on the dry ditch, this time in Washington D.C. Here is the complete text of his remarks: “Well I thank the gentleman for yielding, and Mr. Chairman I rise today against an awful, unlawful expansion of federal power. “The EPA’s attempt at an unprecedented power grab will ultimately saddle the hardworking Americans, small businesses, and farmers with new onerous regulatory burdens. “Under this proposed new rule, the EPA will be able to claim jurisdiction over almost all bodies of water in the U.S. So along with the bays and rivers, the EPA’s hand will extend over streams, ponds, ditches, and even storm-water runoff. “Beyond sounding ridiculous, this rule will impact farmers, energy producers, and any private citizens that use their land for economic or recreational purposes. “It is harmful and unnecessary. Now, I live in the West. The West is burdened right now with the drought. Some of that drought is based upon excess regulations that pick a fish over people, that water will run out to the ocean because of a regulation and a lawsuit. “Now I’ve seen where regulatory effects and burdens have gone before. I have a town in my community called Taft. It’s a hard-working town like many of you have. And the EPA has been a part of it before. It’s a town that could be anywhere in America. And it had a waterway that the EPA said, and it was called Sandy Creek. “The only challenge though in Sandy Creek: it was a dry ditch. It had been dry for  30 years. So when they [Taft] came to me and they wanted to be able to move forward, they found that the federal government was trying to impose a permitting regulation—an excess regulation—on this private land. “I had to personally call, and they said, ‘No, you could not do it because of the creek.’ I had to bring an individual all the way out, drive them out to the dried dirt, sit them in the dry creek bed until finally they said, ‘Yes.’ “Well, under the new bill, in fact, Sandy Creek will not be dry any more from the aspect that the burdensome regulation will be back on it. It could be redesignated and we will not be able to grow again. “Mr. Chairman, we are struggling with job creation in America. We are struggling where small businesses are trying to make ends meet. Milk prices are at an all-time high. Why would we burden America with more regulation? Why would we not unshackle what holds us back and let us be able to grow and let people keep their private lands and protect our water, but do it in a sense that has common sense? I yield back.”  ### Read More

Researchers edging closer to potential valley fever cure

2014/09/22

It's been a good year for the fight against valley fever. In July, the FDA approved a new skin test from San Diego-based Nielsen BioSciences Inc. called Spherusol. Previous skin tests fell out of favor because of a high number of false positives, but Spherusol -- which will roll out in phases starting this year -- has been shown to be more reliable. Read More

McCarthy to Hold U.S. Service Academy Forum on October 25th

2014/09/19

Bakersfield, CA – Congressman Kevin McCarthy will hold a forum in Bakersfield on Saturday, October 25th for students in the 23rd Congressional District interested in attending one of the U.S. Service Academies: "Our nation’s Service Academies provide our students with the opportunity to obtain an excellent education and also equip our young people with the skills to become great leaders,” said Congressman McCarthy. “I am proud that every year, many of our communities’ students choose to attend these schools. This forum offers students and parents the chance to learn more about the application process, academy life, and career opportunities within the various branches of the military. I encourage anyone who is interested to come out and learn more."  There will be information on the application process to receive a congressional nomination to one of the five academies, in addition to briefings and video presentations by Service Academy Liaison Officers. Academy Liaison Officers, along with various visiting cadets and midshipmen from the U.S. Military Academy, U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy, and U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, will provide information on life at an academy. The U.S. Coast Guard Academy offers appointments solely on the basis of a nationwide merit-based competition, and there is no congressional nomination required. Details: Saturday, October 25, 2014 Kern County Board of Supervisors Chambers 1115 Truxtun Avenue, Bakersfield, CA 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. RSVP by calling 661-327-3611 or email RSVP.McCarthy@mail.house.gov Read More

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Removes Kern and Tulare Counties from Elderberry Beetle Regulations

2014/09/16

Washington, D.C. – Today, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service announced that Tulare, Kern and Kings Counties are no longer in the habitat range of the Valley Longhorn Elderberry Beetle.  For decades, protecting the Elderberry Beetle has put costly and time consuming burdens on our local communities making critical infrastructure and economic development projects more expensive.  Today’s announcement means our farmers, small businesses, and cities are no longer subject to unnecessary Endangered Species Act requirements and mitigation for the Elderberry Beetle. Congressman McCarthy issued this statement: “Today’s decision provides needed relief to our local communities that have been forced to expend precious resources to protect a species that is not even located in our region.  With the removal of Elderberry Beetle regulatory mandates from our local area, our communities can continue to focus on creating jobs rather than endure unnecessary and onerous environmental regulations.” “However, it is unfortunate that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has withdrawn its own proposal to delist the Valley Longhorn Elderberry Beetle as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.  I strongly encourage the Fish and Wildlife Service not to withdraw this proposal and to reopen the public comment period so that constituents from other areas affected can provide the most up-to-date facts that show this species has recovered.” Background The Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle was listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1980. A FWS 5-year species review concluded in 2006 recommended delisting the beetle. In 2010, a petition was filed with FWS to delist the beetle as threatened under ESA and remove any beetle critical habitat designations. FWS proposed a rule in 2011 to formally delist the beetle and critical habitat, which can be reviewed here. On April 16, 2013, the Porterville City Council adopted a resolution calling on FWS to delist the beetle and any critical habitat designations.  The resolution can be reviewed here. On June 10, 2014, Congressman McCarthy, California State Senator Jean Fuller, and California Assemblywoman Connie Conway sent a letter to FWS Director Daniel Ashe calling on the Service to act on its own recommendation by finalizing its proposal to delist the Elderberry Beetle as a threatened species. Congressman McCarthy secured language in the Fiscal Year 2015 Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Appropriations Act (H.R. 5171) that would prevent FWS from withdrawing its proposal to delist the Elderberry Beetle and encourages them to delist this species.  The legislation is pending. Read More

McCarthy Speaks to Stop EPA’s Water Rule on Dry Creeks

2014/09/15

  Watch McCarthy's remarks here. Washington, D.C. - Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (CA-23) spoke on the House floor today in favor of H.R. 5078 to preserve local control against the EPA’s unprecedented attempt to expand its power over private property: “Well I thank the gentleman for yielding, and Mr. Chairman I rise today against an awful, unlawful expansion of federal power. “The EPA’s attempt at an unprecedented power grab will ultimately saddle the hardworking Americans, small businesses, and farmers with new onerous regulatory burdens. “Under this proposed new rule, the EPA will be able to claim jurisdiction over almost all bodies of water in the U.S. So along with the bays and rivers, the EPA’s hand will extend over streams, ponds, ditches, and even storm-water runoff. “Beyond sounding ridiculous, this rule will impact farmers, energy producers, and any private citizens that use their land for economic or recreational purposes. “It is harmful and unnecessary. Now, I live in the West. The West is burdened right now with the drought. Some of that drought is based upon excess regulations that pick a fish over people, that water will run out to the ocean because of a regulation and a lawsuit. “Now I’ve seen where regulatory effects and burdens have gone before. I have a town in my community called Taft. It’s a hard-working town like many of you have. And the EPA has been a part of it before. It’s a town that could be anywhere in America. And it had a waterway that the EPA said, and it was called Sandy Creek. “The only challenge though in Sandy Creek: it was a dry ditch. It had been dry for  30 years. So when they [Taft] came to me and they wanted to be able to move forward, they found that the federal government was trying to impose a permitting regulation—an excess regulation—on this private land. “I had to personally call, and they said, ‘No, you could not do it because of the creek.’ I had to bring an individual all the way out, drive them out to the dried dirt, sit them in the dry creek bed until finally they said, ‘Yes.’ “Well, under the new bill, in fact, Sandy Creek will not be dry any more from the aspect that the burdensome regulation will be back on it. It could be redesignated and we will not be able to grow again.  “Mr. Chairman, we are struggling with job creation in America. We are struggling where small businesses are trying to make ends meet. Milk prices are at an all-time high. Why would we burden America with more regulation? Why would we not unshackle what holds us back and let us be able to grow and let people keep their private lands and protect our water, but do it in a sense that has common sense? I yield back.”    ###   Read More

Local veteran presented with five medals by Congressman Kevin McCarthy

2014/08/29

During the Honor Flight fundraising event today, one local veteran was presented with five medals by Congressman Kevin McCarthy that earned during his service in WWII. The medals were presented to 90-year-old Lee Neukirchner at the Wall of Valor in downtown Bakersfield. Neukirchner served in the US Air Force from 1943 to 1946 during WWII, and, fought in Normandy on D-Day. Neukirchner received the Army Good Conduct Medal, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with three bronze service stars, World War II victory Medal, The Honorable Service Lapel Button, and a Sharpshooter Badge with Rifle Bar. Read More

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2421 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-2915
Fax 202-225-2908
kevinmccarthy.house.gov

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Majority Leader

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Congressman Kevin McCarthy represents the 23rd District of California, which spans Kern, Tulare, and Los Angeles counties. First elected in 2006, Kevin is a native of Bakersfield and a fourth-generation Kern County resident. He is committed to policies that give small businesses and entrepreneurs the confidence they need to hire, expand, invest and innovate. After the 2010 midterm elections, Kevin was elected by his colleagues to serve as Majority Whip of the United States House of Representatives.

Kevin started his own small business before the age of 21. He built Kevin O’s Deli from the ground up, even enlisting his father’s help in building the deli’s counter in their garage. He worked hard, hired employees and enjoyed success in his community. That’s also where he first encountered government overregulation. The countless frivolous and redundant rules, as well as the taxes small businesses like his were burdened with, spurred Kevin’s interest in public service. When Kevin sold his business, he used the profits to put himself through college and graduate school. He received both his undergraduate degree and his Masters in Business Administration from California State University, Bakersfield.

During college, Kevin accepted an internship with then-Congressman Bill Thomas, and soon became a member of Congressman Thomas’s staff. Kevin won his first election in 2000 as Trustee to the Kern Community College District. In 2002, McCarthy was elected to represent the 32nd Assembly District in the California State Assembly. As a freshman legislator, he was selected unanimously by his Republican colleagues to serve as the Assembly Republican Leader, becoming the first freshman legislator and the first legislator from Kern County to assume the top Republican post in the California State Assembly. Kevin worked with his colleagues in the Assembly and Senate and with the Governor to reduce California’s budget deficit, overhaul the state worker’s compensation system and enhance California’s business climate to create more opportunities for California workers and businesses until he ran for Congress in 2006.

Kevin brings his personal experience as a small business owner and as an effective leader in the statehouse to Washington D.C. In his role as Majority Whip, Kevin leads the effort in Congress to advance common sense policies that will put America back on the path to prosperity. Since gaining control of the House in November 2010, Kevin and his Republican colleagues have blocked the largest tax increase in American history, cut out-of-control government spending by historic levels and passed numerous pieces of legislation that will help create jobs in America. These bills reduce the burden on small businesses, increase our nation’s energy security by promoting domestic energy production, knock down barriers for small business owners to access capital and help increase certainty for the private sector.

Kevin will continue to fight to get Washington’s fiscal house in order while promoting policies that empower the private sector to invest and create jobs.

When Kevin is not in Washington fighting for the constituents of California’s 23rd District and for the future of America, he is home in Bakersfield with his wife Judy and two children Connor and Meghan.


Serving With

Doug LaMalfa

CALIFORNIA's 1st DISTRICT

Tom McClintock

CALIFORNIA's 4th DISTRICT

Paul Cook

CALIFORNIA's 8th DISTRICT

Jeff Denham

CALIFORNIA's 10th DISTRICT

David Valadao

CALIFORNIA's 21st DISTRICT

Devin Nunes

CALIFORNIA's 22nd DISTRICT

Buck McKeon

CALIFORNIA's 25th DISTRICT

Gary Miller

CALIFORNIA's 31st DISTRICT

Ed Royce

CALIFORNIA's 39th DISTRICT

Ken Calvert

CALIFORNIA's 42nd DISTRICT

John Campbell

CALIFORNIA's 45th DISTRICT

Dana Rohrabacher

CALIFORNIA's 48th DISTRICT

Darrell Issa

CALIFORNIA's 49th DISTRICT

Duncan Hunter

CALIFORNIA's 50th DISTRICT

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