Kay Granger

Kay Granger

TEXAS' 12th DISTRICT

Brief Congressional Update

2015/03/27

Dear Friend,

I know many of you have expressed your opinions regarding the recent vote to fund the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) earlier this month. I want to reiterate that the bill to fund DHS did not provide any funding for President Obama’s immigration executive actions that he outlined in November. 

I believe the confusion lies within the decision House leadership made last fall to force President Obama to rescind his executive actions on immigration by stating Congress would refuse to fully fund the Department of Homeland Security until the President agreed to withdraw his executive order. This gave the false impression that funding DHS meant Congress would be funding the president’s executive action, which is not the case. The bill that passed did not provide any money to support his executive action. I believe the federal court system is now the best chance to prevent President Obama’s illegal executive actions from being implemented. 

This week, the House passed the Republican budget resolution for fiscal year 2016. I voted for the resolution because it balances the budget in less than ten years, it repeals the Affordable Care Act, and takes crucial steps to improve the long-term fiscal health of our country. The budget also boosts defense spending, which is a priority for me. I believe increasing defense spending is an important investment for the U.S. to make at a time when our country continues to combat the threat of the Islamic State and other extremists’ organizations. Defense spending has a profound impact on our local defense industry in North Texas as well. We build state-of-the-art aircraft and weapons systems that are, and will be, used in defense our country. I will always fight to keep a robust defense industry thriving in the 12th congressional district. 

Also, this week, I was appointed to serve on the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. I am looking forward to my service on this subcommittee because water plays such an important role in North Texas. Water infrastructure is a key priority for Texas communities especially with regard to managing drought conditions and preparing now for future flood control emergencies before they occur. 

I also wanted to share the news that the Panther Island project was recently honored as the best “Next Big Idea” at the Urban Land Institute North Texas Impact Awards in Dallas. ULI North Texas is an organization of land use professionals and community leaders. This organization provides leadership in the responsible use of land and in creating and sustaining thriving communities around the country. 

Three finalists for this Impact Award were selected and were invited to present their ideas on stage in front of the audience at the awards event. As one of the finalists, Trinity River Vision Authority presented the vision for the future of 800 acres directly adjacent to downtown Fort Worth. The audience members then voted and selected Panther Island as the winner.

Sincerely,

Kay Granger

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Lockheed Martin, lawmakers tout F-35 supplier chain

2015/03/26

By Leigh Munsil

Lockheed Martin took to Capitol Hill on Wednesday with an F-35 flight simulator and footage of the advanced fighter jet in flight to tout the economic benefits of the massive weapons project for companies supplying key components.

The midday event was a chance for staffers to see the plane and the company to maintain support for the controversial project as they prepare to vote on the Pentagon’s budget for next fiscal year.

Rep. Kay Granger (R-Texas), who represents Forth Worth, where the aircraft is built, spoke at an event in the Rayburn House Office Building’s foyer.

“Even though it’s made in my hometown,” she told Politico, “it’s not just a Fort Worth plane. All these people are involved. It means jobs for everyone all over the United States.”

Lockheed officials also touted the Pentagon’s latest Selected Acquisition Reports published last week, which found that F-35 program costs decreased by $7.5 billion in the most recent reporting period, from $398.6 billion to $391.1 billion.

But Granger warned that if lawmakers want to see continued savings, they can’t adjust the fighter’s production and delivery schedule.

“I’m thrilled. I’m absolutely thrilled,” Granger said of the SAR findings. “The thing that Congress has to be aware of is, Lockheed can do everything they can do to lower the cost, but if Congress then steps in like they’ve done and says, ‘Well, OK we’re going to buy that many but we’re going to slow it down’ — slowing it down raises the price. Congress really needs to be aware of that and understand that if we’re doing that, then don’t come around later and say, 'Oh, we’ve got a price overrun.’”

Granger was joined by Rep. John Larson of Connecticut, whose district includes F-35 engine-maker Pratt & Whitney and Lockheed executive vice president and F-35 program manager Lorraine Martin.

Larson encouraged fellow lawmakers to restore automatic cuts to the Pentagon budget known as sequestration and “get over this notion” that the F-35 program needs to be downsized.

“This is not the time to pull back; this is the time to push forward,” he said.

Martin said the supplier day was a chance to remind members of Congress how important smaller suppliers are to building an affordable jet.

“There are a lot of pressures on this nation and other nations that are a part of this program,” she said. “But quantity matters. Eighty percent of all cost savings going forward are going to come from increased quantity. … Now it’s about buying in bulk throughout the supply chain, and enabling that to bring the cost down. And that is a message that we’re bringing to all of the representatives here."

"Even though we understand that it is really challenging times, we need this aircraft, we need it to be cost-effective, and it means we have to buy it on the profile that’s in the program of record.”

Yet the warnings about the impact of cutting the buy contradict comments from the Air Force’s program manager on Tuesday, who said that now that the company is producing more aircraft each year, it would have minimal impact on unit cost if next year’s buy was modestly reduced.

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Lockheed Martin, lawmakers tout F-35 supplier chain

2015/03/26

By Leigh Munsil

Lockheed Martin took to Capitol Hill on Wednesday with an F-35 flight simulator and footage of the advanced fighter jet in flight to tout the economic benefits of the massive weapons project for companies supplying key components.

The midday event was a chance for staffers to see the plane and the company to maintain support for the controversial project as they prepare to vote on the Pentagon’s budget for next fiscal year.

Rep. Kay Granger (R-Texas), who represents Forth Worth, where the aircraft is built, spoke at an event in the Rayburn House Office Building’s foyer.

“Even though it’s made in my hometown,” she told Politico, “it’s not just a Fort Worth plane. All these people are involved. It means jobs for everyone all over the United States.”

Lockheed officials also touted the Pentagon’s latest Selected Acquisition Reports published last week, which found that F-35 program costs decreased by $7.5 billion in the most recent reporting period, from $398.6 billion to $391.1 billion.

But Granger warned that if lawmakers want to see continued savings, they can’t adjust the fighter’s production and delivery schedule.

“I’m thrilled. I’m absolutely thrilled,” Granger said of the SAR findings. “The thing that Congress has to be aware of is, Lockheed can do everything they can do to lower the cost, but if Congress then steps in like they’ve done and says, ‘Well, OK we’re going to buy that many but we’re going to slow it down’ — slowing it down raises the price. Congress really needs to be aware of that and understand that if we’re doing that, then don’t come around later and say, 'Oh, we’ve got a price overrun.’”

Granger was joined by Rep. John Larson of Connecticut, whose district includes F-35 engine-maker Pratt & Whitney and Lockheed executive vice president and F-35 program manager Lorraine Martin.

Larson encouraged fellow lawmakers to restore automatic cuts to the Pentagon budget known as sequestration and “get over this notion” that the F-35 program needs to be downsized.

“This is not the time to pull back; this is the time to push forward,” he said. Martin said the supplier day was a chance to remind members of Congress how important smaller suppliers are to building an affordable jet.

“There are a lot of pressures on this nation and other nations that are a part of this program,” she said. “But quantity matters. Eighty percent of all cost savings going forward are going to come from increased quantity. … Now it’s about buying in bulk throughout the supply chain, and enabling that to bring the cost down. And that is a message that we’re bringing to all of the representatives here."

"Even though we understand that it is really challenging times, we need this aircraft, we need it to be cost-effective, and it means we have to buy it on the profile that’s in the program of record.”

Yet the warnings about the impact of cutting the buy contradict comments from the Air Force’s program manager on Tuesday, who said that now that the company is producing more aircraft each year, it would have minimal impact on unit cost if next year’s buy was modestly reduced.

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Lockheed Martin brings F-35 cockpit demonstration to Washington, D.C.

2015/03/25

WASHINGTON, March 25, 2015 – Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] today showcased its F-35 Lightning II mobile cockpit demonstrator to Members of Congress at the Rayburn House Office Building.

“We owe our future generations the strongest, most advanced national defense possible. The F-35 is a critical piece in our defense arsenal that will allow us to continue our dominance in the skies into the next generation,” said Rep. Kay Granger, co-chair and founder of the Congressional Joint Strike Fighter Caucus.

“The F-35 is being recognized around the world as a game changer in defense. Powered by Pratt & Whitney engines produced in East Hartford, Connecticut, this aircraft plays a critical role in maintaining our nation's military superiority," said Rep. John Larson, co-chair of the Congressional Joint Strike Fighter Caucus.

“We’re pleased to be able to demonstrate the capabilities of the F-35 Lightning II here in the nation’s capital,” said Lorraine Martin, executive vice president and general manager of the F-35 Lightning II Program for Lockheed Martin. “With more than 1,200 domestic suppliers in 49 states and Puerto Rico, the F-35 program supports more than 129,000 direct and indirect jobs and provides $380 billion in economic impact across the country.”

In additional to American economic impact, thousands more are employed in the F-35 program’s partner countries, which include the United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Australia, Denmark and Norway.  

During today’s event, attendees received an update on the status of the program as well as the opportunity to “fly” the F-35 cockpit demonstrator to experience stealth capability, fighter agility and integrated information through the eyes of a pilot. The cockpit is visually and audibly interactive and provides a realistic look at the F-35’s performance, air-to-air and air-to-ground capabilities, sophisticated sensor fusion and advanced computational capabilities.  

The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th Generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully-fused sensor information and network-enabled operations.

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Granger Opening Statement: Public and Outside Witness Hearing

2015/03/25

The hearing will come to order.

I want to welcome everyone to today’s hearing for the Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs.

I also want to thank all of the witnesses for being here today.  

I want to note for the record that all written testimony received by the subcommittee will be given the same consideration. Each witness will be given four minutes to provide remarks and Members will have one minute to ask questions. Witnesses are reminded that the Members have your full testimony, and you are encouraged to summarize.

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Rep. Kay Granger to co-chair bipartisan task force to combat anti-Semitism

2015/03/24

By Aubree Abril

WASHINGTON – Rep. Kay Granger, R-Fort Worth, joined seven colleagues in Congress Tuesday to launch a Bipartisan Task Force for Combating Anti-Semitism.

She joined Reps. Chris Smith, R-NJ, Nita Lowey, D-NY, Eliot Engel, D-NY, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., Steve Israel, D-NY, Peter Roskam, R-Ill., and Ted Deutch, D-Fla.

The eight House members will serve as co-chairs of the task force formed to address the rise of anti-Semitism around the world.

“Jewish populations are facing increased levels of hatred, frequently under the guise of political differences of other alibis, but in reality it is solely because of their faith,” the co-chairs said in a joint statement.

The task force plans to educate members and explore ways to teach tolerance and confront hate.

“It is the responsibility of everyone who believes in basic universal liberties and freedoms to condemn this trend and work together to root out the hatred which underlies anti-Semitism,” the co-chairs said. “We look forward to working with our colleagues in Congress to find innovative solutions that match the 21st century face of the age-old bigotry.”

Former Dallas Rep-Martin Frost was the first Jewish congressman to serve in a House leadership post. He served as chairman of the House Democratic Caucus from 1999-2003.

http://trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com/2015/03/rep-kay-granger-to-co-chair-bipartisan-task-force-to-combat-anti-semitism.html/

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U.S. Lawmakers Launch Task Force to Combat Global Anti-Semitism

2015/03/24

By Lucy Westcott - 3/24/15

A bipartisan task force to combat rising global anti-Semitism was set up by the House of Representatives on Tuesday in response to a number of attacks targeting Europe’s Jewish community this year.

The House Foreign Affairs Committee heard testimony from European Jewish leaders on Tuesday about the spike in attacks on Jews in Europe, including the January attacks on a kosher supermarket and the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris; the deadly shooting at a Copenhagen synagogue last month; the 2012 attack on a Jewish school in Toulouse, France; and the 2014 killings at the Jewish Museum in Brussels.

The Bipartisan Taskforce for Combating Anti-Semitism, co-chaired by four Republicans and four Democrats, was created to help Congress fight global anti-Semitism around the world and to promote tolerance and remembrance of the Holocaust. The task force will educate congressional members on the “distinct form of intolerance” that is anti-Semitism and will work with foreign leaders, civil society groups and the executive branch to share ways to reduce acts of hate and anti-Semitism worldwide.

“We look forward to working with our colleagues in Congress to find innovative solutions that match the 21st century face of this age-old bigotry,” U.S. Representatives Chris Smith, Nita Lowey, Eliot Engel, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Kay Granger, Steve Israel, Peter Roskam and Ted Deutch said in a joint statement.

Testifying in front of Congress on Tuesday, Ronald Lauder, president of the World Jewish Congress, noted a “strange confluence of hatred” across Europe that includes radical Muslims, far-right and neo-Nazi political groups like Jobbik in Hungary and Golden Dawn in Greece, and an elite, educated class of people “with a pathological hatred of Israel,” all of which, along with years of economic downturn, has caused a rise in anti-Semitism in Europe.

“For the first few decades following World War II, we mistakenly believed that anti-Semitism—the age-old hatred of Jews—had finally disappeared from Europe and everywhere else,” said Lauder. “I now tell you with the greatest sadness that, 70 years later, the age-old virus of anti-Semitism has returned in all its evil and ugliness. Anti-Semitism has returned to streets of Paris and Toulouse, to the streets of Brussels and Copenhagen. It has even returned to Berlin.”

France, which with 500,000 Jews has the world’s third largest Jewish population, behind Israel and the U.S., has seen a particularly sharp rise in anti-Semitic attacks over the past year and has increased security at Jewish schools following the Charlie Hebdo attack. A February report for Le Parisien newspaper and the French TV program CQFD found 68 percent of French people believe anti-Semitism is on the rise. Seventy-seven percent believed Islamophobia is increasing.

Jews in France experienced twice as many anti-Semitic attacks in 2014 compared with 2013, according to a report released in January by the country’s Jewish Community Security Service.

Jews in Denmark also faced threats and attacks last year. According to Dan Rosenberg Asmussen, president of the Danish Jewish Community, who testified before Congress on Tuesday, fewer Danish Jews are wearing yarmulkes, and “they wouldn’t dare” for fear of being physically attacked in certain areas of Copenhagen, he said.

On February 15, Dan Uzan, a volunteer security guard, was shot dead outside the main Copenhagen synagogue, hours after a shooting at a debate on freedom of speech and Islam at a cultural center in the city.

“The terror attack against the Jewish community in Denmark did not occur in a vacuum. It did not happen in Copenhagen just by chance. It was the culmination of years of growing anti-Semitism,” said Asmussen. “It happened in a country where it has become widely acceptable to criticize and question both Israel and Jews with a carelessness that we did not expect or imagine just a few years ago."

Representative Curt Clawson, R-Florida, who noted his own Danish ancestry, asked what the world could do next, especially if the solution to global anti-Semitism cannot be found within the Muslim community.

“What we see in Denmark is the same all over. The Muslim community tends to be very fractured,” said Asmussen. He cited the “ring of peace” that saw Muslims form a human shield around a Copenhagen synagogue earlier this month, which mirrored a similar initiative around an Oslo synagogue in February. But not many Muslims take part in such displays of solidarity, said Asmussen.

Lauder, Asmussen and Roger Cukierman, president of the Council of Jewish Institutions of France, who also testified, all agreed that not every country takes the anti-Semitism threat seriously, and that the U.S. needs to do more to step up the pressure and fight it.

Both Lauder and Cukierman said the Internet can be a tool and a platform to disseminate hatred and ill-feeling toward Jews. “On the Internet, ways were found to ban child pornography. Likewise, anti-Semitism must be banned,” said Cukierman. “The providers of Internet must understand that they bear a responsibility when murders are committed by youngsters who became jihadists through the Internet.”

http://www.newsweek.com/us-lawmakers-launch-task-force-combat-global-anti-semitism-316555

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Granger Opening Statement: Budget Hearing - Assistance to Central America

2015/03/24

The Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs will come to order.

I would like to welcome our witnesses to today’s hearing:

  • Roberta Jacobson, Assistant Secretary of State for the Western Hemisphere
  • William Brownfield, Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement
  • Elizabeth Hogan, Acting Assistant Administrator of U.S.A.I.D. for Latin America and the Caribbean

Last summer, our country experienced a national security and humanitarian crisis of historic proportions as tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors were sent through criminal smuggling networks from Central America, across Mexico, and to our southern border. Although the number of unaccompanied children has dropped since then, thousands more are expected to cross this year. This is unacceptable.  

At the Speaker’s request, I led a working group to examine this issue and provide recommendations. I visited the Texas-Mexico border several times. I also led a delegation to Guatemala and Honduras to see where the children were coming from and why. There are many reasons why so many families and children have made, and continue to make, this dangerous journey. Some of this can be explained by the Administration’s slow pace of deportations and insufficient focus on law enforcement at the border. The harsh conditions and lack of security in Central America also play a role. In addition, the lack of economic opportunity and high unemployment is causing people to look for other ways to survive.  

The purpose of today’s hearing is to discuss what the United States and other countries in the region can do to put an end to this illegal migration at its source. The United States has provided assistance to Central America for many years. We need to take a hard look at what has worked, what has not, and what changes need to be made going forward.   

Last year’s appropriations act increased assistance for Central America and also included support for programs to combat human trafficking and help countries repatriate and reintegrate their citizens. The Administration’s budget request includes $1 billion for Central America, more than double the amount provided last year. The committee needs an explanation from our witnesses of how such a large investment will change the situation on our border.  

While the United States has a role to play in helping Central America, we cannot and should not do this alone. Other countries in the region have a stake in Central America’s failure or success. Our neighbor, Mexico is on the front lines of combating the illegal migration issue and we must do all we can to help Mexico strengthen its borders. In addition, we should also support and use the capabilities of partners in the region, such as Colombia.

There are a number of lessons we can learn from ‘Plan Colombia’ that can help guide us. One of those lessons is that for lasting change to occur, we need a solid commitment from the partner countries themselves. These governments must be willing to make hard choices and address the needs of their own citizens. I have met with the Presidents of some of these countries and have already seen progress. For the first time, the Central American governments have come together to develop a joint plan to address shared problems in the region. Just as I believe the United States should assist these countries, so too should we hold the governments accountable for following through on their commitments.

I look forward to hearing from our witnesses today on how we can best address these important issues. 

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Members of Congress Announce the Launch of Bipartisan Taskforce on Anti-Semitism

2015/03/24

(Washington, DC) - Today, U.S. Reps. Chris Smith (NJ-04), Nita Lowey (NY-17), Eliot Engel (NY-16), Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (FL-27), Kay Granger (TX-12), Steve Israel (NY-03), Peter Roskam (IL-06), and Ted Deutch (FL-21) announced the launch of the Bipartisan Taskforce for Combating Anti-Semitism in the House of Representatives. Together, these Members will serve as co-Chairs of the Taskforce in the 114th Congress and spearhead initiatives aimed at addressing the alarming rise of anti-Semitism around the world.

The Bipartisan Taskforce for Combating Anti-Semitism was formed in order to ensure that Congress plays an integral role in condemning anti-Semitism and promoting tolerance worldwide.

The Taskforce will serve as a forum for educating Members on this distinct form of intolerance and to engage with the Executive Branch, foreign leaders, and civil society organizations for the sharing of best practices and cooperating on solutions to rebuff this disturbing trend. It will also promote Holocaust Remembrance in concert with exploring innovative ways to teach tolerance and confront hate.

The co-Chairs issued the following joint statement:

“Around the world, we are witnessing an alarming rise of anti-Semitism that is dangerous and complex. Over the past few years, Jewish schools, synagogues, and even homes and property have been targets of anti-Semitic violence. Jewish populations are facing increased levels of hatred, frequently under the guise of political differences or other alibis, but in reality it is solely because of their faith. It is the responsibility of everyone who believes in basic universal liberties and freedoms to condemn this trend and work together to root out the hatred which underlies anti-Semitism. We look forward to working with our colleagues in Congress to find innovative solutions that match the 21st century face of this age-old bigotry.”

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Ex-Israeli president on a peace mission

2015/03/23

By Anna M. Tinsley 03/23/2015 3:29 PM

FORT WORTH  —  Former Israeli President Shimon Peres has dedicated his life toward finding peace.

And the former president — who left office last year after seven decades of public service, holding every notable post in Israel’s government, including prime minister twice — isn’t stopping now.

The 91-year-old, who visited Fort Worth Monday to speak at a luncheon honoring the 50th anniversary of Tarrant County College, spends much time working at the Peres Center for Peace in Israel.

“Enemies are very expensive,” he told a crowd of hundreds gathered at the Fort Worth Convention Center ballroom for the “A World View” TCC Foundation luncheon. “Friends ... pay off in different ways.”

U.S. Rep. Kay Granger, a Fort Worth Republican and honorary co-chair of the luncheon, was among those to note that Peres “has had a remarkable career.”

As Peres — who has had the rare honor of receiving the Nobel Peace Price, Congressional Gold Medal and the Presidential Peace Prize — talked about his vision for the Middle East and the world, a small group of Palestinian protesters marched downtown.

They chanted “Free Palestine” through a bullhorn and carried signs that read “Peace for Palestine,” “Free Palestine” and “End Occupation.”   Peace in the Middle East

Peres, the ninth president of Israel who is often described as the last of the country’s founding fathers, answered questions asked by former U.S. Ambassador and moderator Tom Schieffer.

Schieffer asked, for instance, about a proposed two-state solution to resolve some conflict in the Middle East, which would divide Israelis and Palestinians, creating an independent state of Palestine right next to the state of Israel.

Peres said he supports the concept.

“It’s better to have two states living in peace than one state without peace,” he said.

Schieffer also asked about Israel’s relationship with the United States and whether other countries — from China to Russia — could become competition for the U.S.

“America became great by giving, not taking,” Peres said, noting that unless other countries adopt the same attitude, they won’t be in the same league.

“You will not have a serious competition unless the other people will be as generous and wise as (the United States) is.”

When asked who his favorite U.S. presidents and Secretaries of State were, Peres noted that many were friendly and impressive.

And when asked why so many American presidents begin their terms with the goal of finding peace in the Middle East, but seem to have problems with that, Peres noted that “they were successful on occasions.”

Country music star Pat Green was among those present at the event, even singing the Israeli national anthem.

Popular topic

Israel and its ties to the United States is a popular topic among politicians.

On Monday, as Texas U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz was announcing that he’s in the race to become the 2016 GOP presidential nominee, he weighed in on the issue.

When he said, “Imagine a president who stands unequivocally with Israel,” he drew some of the loudest applause given during his speech.

And last week, when former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta was in Fort Worth for a World Affairs Council program, he noted that the U.S. has “a very special relationship with Israel.”

That’s why, he said, it’s key for Obama to overcome an often strained relationship with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

“There are a whole series of threats (both countries) face,” Panetta said. “The last thing we need is the president of the United States and the prime minister of Israel to not get along.”

TCC anniversary

Monday’s luncheon was the first of two major events Tarrant County College has planned to mark the college’s 50th anniversary this year.

Granger and former U.S. House Speaker Jim Wright, D-Fort Worth, served as honorary co-chairs for the event, although Wright was unable to attend.

The second will be a community celebration at historic Panther Island on Aug. 1.

TCC first opened its doors in 1965 as Tarrant County Junior College. Through the years, the college has grown to five campuses.

“I want to congratulate Tarrant County College on reaching this significant 50-year milestone,” Granger said, adding that the college has had a profound impact on North Texas.

“It has helped shape the direction and success of Fort Worth over the last five decades,” she said.

http://www.star-telegram.com/news/politics-government/article16104080.html

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Contact Information

1026 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-5071
Fax 202-225-5683
kaygranger.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Appropriations

A former teacher, small business owner and Mayor of Fort Worth, Congresswoman Kay Granger was first elected to represent the 12th congressional district of Texas in 1997.  Earning a reputation for pragmatic leadership and serving as a powerful voice for Texas values, Kay fervently fights for the issues that matter most to Texas’ 12th congressional district and our country.

Since arriving in the U.S. House of Representatives, Kay has distinguished herself as one of the most recognized and influential leaders on defense and foreign policy – an expertise she began developing as the Mayor of Fort Worth, which is home to the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base and Lockheed Martin.  As a senior member of the powerful Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, she has continually strengthened the 12th District’s contribution to America’s defense system and supported efforts to provide for our women and men in uniform – both on the battlefield and when they return home from combat.

In 2012, Kay stood with Governor Rick Perry and members of the 136th Airlift Wing of the Texas Air National Guard to fight a costly and unnecessary Air Force proposal that looked to move Texas’ prized C-130 squadron to Montana.  To the Air Force, Texans, and the millions of Americans who depend on the C-130 aircraft to respond to natural disaster emergencies, Kay delivered a powerful message:  C-130s will not be moved without a fight.  Thanks to her work as well as that of Governor Perry, Senator Cornyn, Senator Hutchinson and the entire Texas delegation, the C-130’s stayed where they are needed and where they belong:  Fort Worth.

Kay has long believed that national security and foreign policy go hand in hand.  As the top Republican on the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee, she has worked to increase global stability and security as well enrich the lives of millions in the developing world through efforts that center on bettering global health, improving the lives of women and teaching emerging democracies how to sustain newly-discovered freedoms.

Kay is also a Majority Deputy Whip and serves on the Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development.

In recognition of her achievements, Kay has received the Air Force Foundation Award and the Marine Corps’ Semper Fidelis Award.  She has also been honored with the Tax Fighter Award by the National Tax Limitation Committee and the Spirit of Enterprise Award by the U.S. Chamber of Congress.  Additionally, the National Association of Manufacturers has recognized her for her pro-growth, pro-worker voting record.  For a full list of the awards she’s received, please click here.

Born in Greenville, TX, Kay was raised in Fort Worth.  Majoring in education, Kay – a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution – graduated from Texas Wesleyan University and became a high school journalism and English teacher.  In 1978, she opened her own insurance agency and operated it for over 20 years, leading her to become the first woman inducted into the Fort Worth Business Hall of Fame.  In 1991, she was elected as the first female Mayor of Fort Worth where she cut crime by 49 percent and led the city to win the coveted All-American City Award.  Kay, who attends the First United Methodist Church in Fort Worth, is a mother of three and a proud grandmother to five.


Serving With

Louie Gohmert

TEXAS' 1st DISTRICT

Ted Poe

TEXAS' 2nd DISTRICT

Sam Johnson

TEXAS' 3rd DISTRICT

John Ratcliffe

TEXAS' 4th DISTRICT

Jeb Hensarling

TEXAS' 5th DISTRICT

Joe Barton

TEXAS' 6th DISTRICT

John Culberson

TEXAS' 7th DISTRICT

Kevin Brady

TEXAS' 8th DISTRICT

Michael McCaul

TEXAS' 10th DISTRICT

Michael Conaway

TEXAS' 11th DISTRICT

Mac Thornberry

TEXAS' 13th DISTRICT

Randy Weber

TEXAS' 14th DISTRICT

Bill Flores

TEXAS' 17th DISTRICT

Randy Neugebauer

TEXAS' 19th DISTRICT

Lamar Smith

TEXAS' 21st DISTRICT

Pete Olson

TEXAS' 22nd DISTRICT

Will Hurd

TEXAS' 23rd DISTRICT

Kenny Marchant

TEXAS' 24th DISTRICT

Roger Williams

TEXAS' 25th DISTRICT

Michael Burgess

TEXAS' 26th DISTRICT

Blake Farenthold

TEXAS' 27th DISTRICT

John Carter

TEXAS' 31st DISTRICT

Pete Sessions

TEXAS' 32nd DISTRICT

Brian Babin

TEXAS' 36th DISTRICT

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