Kay Granger

Kay Granger

TEXAS' 12th DISTRICT

Granger Delivers Floor Speech in Support of House Republican Border Crisis Supplemental Legislation

2014/07/31

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12), Chairwoman of the House Working Group to address the national security and humanitarian crisis at the southern border, spoke on the House floor today in the support of the House Republican Border Crisis Supplemental legislation.

Remarks as Prepared for Delivery

Thank you Mr. Chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, As we speak, unaccompanied minors continue to be sent from Central America through drug cartel smuggling networks across Mexico and through our southern border.

Families are being lied to and manipulated by the coyotes. The $6,000 their families spend to send their children to the United States goes into the bank accounts of the most powerful drug cartels in the world. Since October, over 58,000 unaccompanied children have made the dangerous journey to the United States, and many more will continue to come unless we send a clear message that they will not be allowed to stay in the United States.

I have seen firsthand the crisis that has unfolded at the southern border in places like the Rio Grande Valley and South Texas. I have seen the women and children sleeping on the floor of a bus station in Laredo. I have seen motherless infants being cared for by any stranger who is around. I have seen the children who are alone in detention facilities in McAllen, Texas and I have seen the 1,200 kids who are being sheltered at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. And, most disturbing of all, I have heard the stories about the most god-awful journey no one should ever have to experience.

We are here today because we have a responsibility to stop this crisis. The president has failed to lead, so I firmly believe this chamber must act. Doing nothing is not an option.

Since June when the speaker asked me to lead a working group to provide policy recommendations on what we can do to address the crisis, I have been to the Texas-Mexico border twice and led a CODEL to Guatemala and Honduras to see where the children are coming from and why. I will be returning to the border tomorrow for a third time.

The members of the working group dove head-first into this issue to understand this crisis and provide recommendations for a short-term, immediate response. The policies we recommended are not an attempt at immigration reform. They are serious solutions to address this crisis. I want to take a moment to recognize the hard work of the members of the working group who made policy recommendations to the conference and the expertise they all brought to the table. I want to thank:

Chairman of the Judiciary Committee Bob Goodlatte Chairman of the Homeland Security Committee Michael McCaul Chairman of the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee John Carter Chairman of the Western Hemisphere Foreign Affairs Subcommittee Matt Salmon Congressman Steve Pearce from the Financial Services Committee Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart from the Appropriations Committee

One of our conclusions from the last several weeks is that Congress should not provide more resources to the administration without changing the policies that have led us to the situation we are in today.

Administration officials, and officials in the Central American countries, have all said that we have to make changes to the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008. A month ago it appeared there was a bipartisan consensus forming on the issue. White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said from the White House podium just three weeks ago, when discussing changes to the 2008 law that it is: “A priority of this administration, and if you listen to the public comments of Democrats and Republicans, it sounds like it’s a bipartisan priority.” I agree. And it is disappointing that the White House has backed down from their original statements on how we could immediately address this issue.   

We are not asking for a repeal of this law. We are saying we need to tweak the 2008 law so that all unaccompanied minors are treated the same as Mexican and Canadian children for removal purposes.  The policy changes included in this bill ensure that children receive a prompt hearing within seven days after they are detained, and require that a judge rules no later than 72 hours after a hearing.

Accelerating the hearing times requires more judges. I thank the chairman for including the necessary funding to hire 40 temporary judges until this crisis is under control. For repatriations, we are prioritizing “last in, first out.” This means that the last child to go into U.S. government custody will be the first one we send home.

After families have spent between $6,000 and $9,000 to send their children here, this will send a strong message to the families in the countries of origin that their children will not be permitted to stay. This is a message of deterrence. I also note that Chairman Rogers has prioritized funding for Central American countries to safely and humanely return these children.

With the surge of children there has been increased pressure on our Customs and Border Protection officials. This supplemental deploys the National Guard to assist high traffic states. This will free up the Border Patrol to focus on their mission. To fully support Customs and Border Protection’s mission, we include a provision to allow Border Patrol unfettered access to federal lands. Right now through a memorandum of understanding, Border Patrol officials are only permitted to pursue suspects onto federal lands. They cannot do regular patrols.

Finally, the supplemental includes a sense of Congress that children should not be detained at military bases. While this will not change the law, this provision addresses a serious and growing concern from members of congress. Not least of the concerns is that children should not be stored on military bases.  

The Congressional Budget Office has given its assessment of the policy changes in this bill. They have said that because the legislation allows for the children to self-deport, it will lead to immediate savings.

This is a smart, targeted bill that addresses the crisis immediately. I urge my colleagues to vote yes on the supplemental and show the American people that we are going to end this crisis.

Thank you, Chairman Rogers, and I yield back the balance of my time.  

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Myths and Facts: House Republican Border Crisis Supplemental Legislation

2014/07/31

House Republican Border Crisis Supplemental LegislationMyths and Facts

Myth: The bill would abolish voluntary return for unaccompanied minors.

Fact: The bill would make all unaccompanied minors eligible for voluntary return immediately, speeding the return of many unaccompanied minors to their home countries. Current law only allows UACs from contiguous countries to be eligible for voluntary return.

Myth: This bill will result in more people getting asylum.

Fact: This bill will reduce the number of migrant children granted asylum. Under the House Republican bill, unaccompanied children from countries other than Mexico would be treated the same as unaccompanied children from Mexico and made eligible for immediate return to their home countries, reducing the number of those who may claim asylum. This prioritization is expected to further reduce the number of applications for asylum given the fact that 95 percent of unaccompanied children who applied for asylum in FY 2014 did so after being in the U.S. for more than 100 days. Through the 3rd quarter of fiscal year 2014, only two percent of unaccompanied minors have claimed asylum and only a portion of those claims were approved.  

Myth: The bill appears to put the majority of unaccompanied minors in the new court proceedings, where they are permitted to withdraw their application for admission at any time.

Fact: This is false. The bill would only put unaccompanied minors who do not consent to voluntary return into court proceedings, and these court proceedings would be expedited to hasten the return of these children to their home countries.

Myth: The bill creates a new seven-day court proceeding for all unaccompanied minors in which an immigration judge determines whether a UAC has a claim for immigration relief.

Fact: The court removal proceedings are not seven-days long, but must occur within seven days. At this expedited removal proceeding, the child will be required to prove to the judge that they are eligible for relief from removal under current law and standards. If not, they will be ordered removed and detained until they are sent back home. This new expedited procedure allows the unaccompanied child no opportunity to appeal or delay proceedings

Myth: Unaccompanied children are screened for credible fear by the Border Patrol

Fact: Under both current law and the bill, border patrol agents cannot make a credible fear determination, they can merely refer an unaccompanied child for a credible fear interview. Even then, a credible fear screening is only the first step in the asylum process.

Myth: The majority of these UACs will claim a fear of persecution or state their intent to apply for asylum.

Fact: Through the 3rd quarter of FY 2014, only two percent of UACs have claimed asylum and only a portion of those claims were approved.  Under current law, the first step in the asylum process is the credible fear interview at USCIS. If UACs succeed at this interview, they must be detained pending a final adjudication of the asylum claim. If they fail to prove their full claim, they will be ordered removed from the country.

Myth: The House bill states that the DHS Secretary “shall permit” UACs who have received Notices to Appear (issued since Jan. 1, 2013) to appear before an immigration judge in the new proceeding created by the bill, move to have the Notice to Appear “replaced,” and apply for admission to the U.S.

Fact: The bill does not allow for the re-opening of orders of removal. The bill would merely allow children who have received Notices to Appear, but not had a court date, to come into court, submit to government detention and either be voluntarily removed or immediately placed in a non-appealable removal hearing.

Myth: The House bill does not use the word “detention” but rather “custody.” This is an important distinction because “custody” can be satisfied by transferring a UAC to HHS, which places the UAC in a non-secure setting.

Fact: There is no evidence that children are absconding from or escaping from HHS facilities. HHS does maintain secure facilities for children who are a danger or flight risk. If a child does escape and abscond from their court proceedings, they will be ordered removed in absentia and become an immigration fugitive. Keeping all children in secure detention facilities is dangerous, excessive and unnecessary.

Myth: The changes to the 2008 law in this bill would achieve the reverse of the bill’s intention- that this bill would result in all unaccompanied child minors, from all countries, going through a longer process - the same process given to minors who have been victims of trafficking, has a credible fear of persecution, or is unable to make a decision about withdrawing their application

Fact: This is false. Other similar bills that amend the 2008 included drafting errors which created this unintentional consequence. The terminology in the bill requires that unaccompanied children meet certain requirements to be eligible for removal, including the fact that they were not a victim of sex trafficking.  Some bills had drafted their text to say “does not meet” which would have created a double negative and in fact had the result of excluding all unaccompanied children from voluntary removal. This bill does not result in treating Mexican children like non-contiguous countries and uses the proper phrasing to ensure that all UACs are treated the same, thus speeding the return of these children to their home countries.

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Granger Testifies at Rules Committee Hearing on Border Crisis Supplemental

2014/07/30

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12), Chairwoman of the House Working Group to address the national security and humanitarian crisis at the southern border, testified today during the House Rules Committee hearing on H.R. 5230, the House border crisis supplemental legislation. Granger discussed the Working Group recommendations included in the supplemental legislation.

Granger’s Opening Statement as Prepared for Delivery

Thank you Chairman Sessions and Ranking Member Slaughter.

I am proud to sit with Chairman Rogers today and testify on a bill that provides an immediate and targeted response to address the humanitarian crisis that is happening right now on our southern border.

As we speak, unaccompanied minors are being sent from Central America through drug cartel smuggling networks across Mexico and through our southern border. Since October, over 58,000 unaccompanied children have made this journey, and many more will continue to come unless we send a clear message that they will not be allowed to stay in the United States. Congress cannot provide more resources to address this crisis without changing the policies that have led to the situation we are in today.

Since Speaker Boehner asked me to lead a working group to provide policy recommendations on what we can do to address the crisis, I have been to the Texas-Mexico border twice and led a CODEL to Guatemala and Honduras to see where the children are coming from and why.

From meetings with State Department officials in Guatemala, to meetings with Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, those who are closest to the problem all say that we have to make changes to the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008. The policy recommendations the Working Group presented to the conference makes a tweak to the 2008 law so that all unaccompanied minors are treated the same as Mexican and Canadian children for removal purposes.  The policy changes included in the supplemental also ensure that children receive a prompt hearing within seven days after they are detained, and with a requirement that a judge rules no later than 72 hours after a hearing. Accelerating the hearing times will require more judges. Our recommendation is that there are 40 temporary judges brought online until this crisis is under control.   For repatriations we are prioritizing last in, first out. This will send a strong message to the families in the countries of origin that their children will not be permitted to stay.  

With the surge of children, there has been increased pressure on our Customs and Border Protection officials. This supplemental deploys the National Guard to assist high traffic states. This will free up the Border Patrol to focus on their mission. To fully support Customs and Border Protection’s mission, we include a provision to allow CBP unfettered access to federal lands. Right now through a memorandum of understanding, CBP officials are only permitted to pursue suspects onto federal lands. They cannot do regular patrols. This has created high traffic areas for migrants who are doing far more damage to these protected lands than regular CBP patrols would.

Finally, the supplemental includes a sense of Congress that children should not be detained at military bases. While this will not change the law, this provision addresses a serious and growing concern from members of Congress. Not least of the concerns is that housing children on military installations are the least cost-effective facilities to house children.   The Congressional Budget Office has given some initial feedback on the policy recommendations in the bill.  They have said that because the legislation allows for the children to self deport it will lead to immediate savings.

Thank you for your time and I look forward to answering your questions.

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Granger Statement on House Border Crisis Supplemental Package

2014/07/29

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12), Chairwoman of the House Working Group to address the national security and humanitarian crisis at the southern border, issued the following statement regarding the policy recommendations included in the House border crisis supplemental package.   

“This is a crisis that deserves decisive leadership from President Obama, but his Administration has failed to lead, so the House will take action this week to resolve the urgent situation at the southern border. It would be irresponsible to allow this crisis to continue unabated for another month without immediate action to secure the border and deter more unaccompanied minors from making the journey and crossing the border illegally.  

“The working group recommendations that have been included are the options I believe represent the most urgent actions that need to be taken to curb the flow of unaccompanied minors, along with women with children, from making the perilous journey to the U.S. border. Additionally, this plan provides the tools necessary to process and humanely return unaccompanied children and family units home as quickly as possible as well as to secure our southern border.

“The working group has diligently worked to provide recommendations for the conference to consider that were derived from meetings with interested parties and visits to the Texas-Mexico border and Central America, so I am pleased that many of the most essential aspects of the group’s recommendations have been included in the supplemental.”

Policy Recommendations Included in the House Border Crisis Supplemental Package

•    Amend the Trafficking Victims Protection and Reauthorization Act of 2008 to require that all unaccompanied minors are treated the same as unaccompanied minors from Canada and Mexico for the purpose of removals. Additionally, this would require unaccompanied children who do not wish to be voluntarily returned to their home country to remain in Health and Human Services custody while they await an expedited immigration court hearing that must occur not more than 7 days after they are screened by child welfare officials. Priority removal will be given to the children who have most recently arrived in the United States.

•    Deploy additional temporary judges to expedite the hearing of asylum and credible fear claims.

•    Change the Immigration and Nationality act to strengthen the law prohibiting criminals with serious drug related convictions from applying for asylum.  

•    Prohibits the Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture (USDA) from denying or restricting U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) activities on federal land under their respective jurisdictions within 100 miles of the US-Mexico border.

•    Deploy the National Guard to the Southern border to assist Border Patrol. 

Text of the legislation, H.R. 5230:

http://appropriations.house.gov/UploadedFiles/07.29.14_FY_2014_Supplemental_Appropriations_Bill.pdf

 

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Granger Releases Border Crisis Working Group Recommendations

2014/07/23

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12), Chairwoman of the House Working Group to address the national security and humanitarian crisis at the southern border, issued the following statement announcing the group’s recommendations and solutions.

“This morning, I presented to the House GOP Conference the recommendations of Speaker Boehner’s working group. I am proud of the set of recommendations and solutions that the working group has crafted over the last few weeks. These recommendations reflect the immediate crisis this country faces by providing common-sense, compassionate, but tough solutions.

“Our focus has been to ensure the safety of the children and it has remained a top priority throughout this process. In our personal meetings with the Presidents of Honduras and Guatemala they both stated that they wanted their children back, and we believe that is in the best interest of all the countries involved in this crisis. We look forward to working with these countries as they prepare to receive their children back.

“Anyone who has been to South Texas and the Rio Grande Valley knows that the men and women of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection are doing a remarkable job, but they are stretched thin with the massive surge of children crossing the border, and the quickest way to provide relief is by deploying the National Guard. The National Guard would also assist with the humanitarian care and needs of the unaccompanied minors, which will free up the Border Patrol to focus on their primary mission.

“The recommendation to amend the Trafficking Victims Protection and Reauthorization Act of 2008 is something both parties agree on and modifications to the law can be done to expedite the process while ensuring proper protections are in place for the children who need them. We recommend amending the 2008 law, so that all unaccompanied minors are treated the same for the purpose of removal. This would be done by requiring unaccompanied minors who do not wish to be voluntarily returned to their home country to remain in Health and Human Services’ custody while they await an expedited immigration court hearing that must promptly occur after they are screened by child welfare officials.

“I appreciate the hard work the members of the working group have given to this process. Their insight and passion has been a crucial part of developing the recommendations we have set forth today.”

Recommendations and Solutions

Increase Border Security

•    Deploy the National Guard to the Southern border to assist Border Patrol in the humanitarian care and needs of the unaccompanied minors. This will free up the Border Patrol to focus on their primary mission.

•    Prohibit the Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture (USDA) from denying or restricting U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) activities on federal land under their respective jurisdictions.

•    Require a DHS strategy and implementation plan to gain operational control of the Southwest border.  

•    Establish independent third party commission to develop border security metrics as a means to accurately gauge progress on border security.

•    Establish border security in Central American countries and Mexico.

Return the Children

•    Establish repatriation centers in originating countries in order to facilitate the return of family units and unaccompanied minors.  

•    Deploy aggressive messaging campaigns in originating countries and the U.S. to dispel immigration myths, clarify that individuals will be deported on arrival and advise on the dangers and legal penalties of traveling through Mexico to enter the United States illegally.  

•    Mandate the detention of all Family Units apprehended at the border with the ultimate goal of processing family units 5-7 days. Congress must continue stringent oversight to ensure this mandate is being met.

Tweaking the 2008 Human Trafficking Law

•    Amend the Trafficking Victims Protection and Reauthorization Act of 2008 so all unaccompanied minors are treated the same as Mexicans for the purpose of removals. This would require unaccompanied children who do not wish to be voluntarily returned to their home country to remain in HHS custody while they await an expedited immigration court hearing that must occur not more than 7 days after they are screened by child welfare officials.  

•    Deploy additional judge teams and temporary judges to expedite the hearing of asylum and credible fear claims. Congress must address the occurrences of fraud in our asylum system. Baseless claims crowd the immigration court system and delay processing for those with legitimate claims. The standard under current law that allows an alien to show a "credible fear of persecution" needs to be examined and addressed to ensure a fraud-free system moving forward.  In addition, criminal aliens and criminal gang members should not receive asylum.

•    Establish tough penalties for those engaged in human smuggling, including the smuggling of unaccompanied minors by strengthening penalties for human smugglers and those who assist them.

•    Increase law enforcement operations domestically and in originating countries to disrupt and dismantle transnational criminal organizations and encourage originating countries to pass strict laws against human smuggling.

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Granger Statement Regarding Border Crisis Working Group

2014/07/18

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12), Chairwoman of the House Working Group to address the crisis at the southern border, issued the following statement regarding the working group.

“The working group, appointed by Speaker Boehner to address the ongoing crisis at the southern border, has made extraordinary progress in a short amount of time to understand the facts of the situation at the border, and develop sensible, humane, but tough recommendations on a course of action for Congress and the President to act on immediately.

“After personally visiting the Texas-Mexico border twice, traveling to Central America to meet with the Presidents of Honduras and Guatemala, and hearing directly from those involved in this crisis, there is no mistaking that the United States has a national security and humanitarian crisis at its southern border. This is not a political problem. This is an urgent crisis that must be dealt with immediately.

“The working group believes there are steps that can be taken to stop individuals, mostly women and children, from making the horrific trip from Central America to our southern border. Additionally, we must ensure that our border is secure and that unaccompanied minors are repatriated back to their home country in a swift and humane way, while ensuring proper protections are in place for the children who need them. I appreciate the legislative solutions being introduced by members of the working group and look forward to incorporating many of their ideas in our recommendations. It is my intention to provide the working group’s final report to the House GOP conference early next week when the House returns for legislative business.”

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Speaker’s Working Group Joint Statement Regarding Crisis on Southern Border

2014/07/09

After meeting today, the Speaker’s working group issued the following statement regarding the humanitarian and national security crisis at the southern border. The working group will provide the first update to the House GOP Conference on Tuesday, July 15. The Members of the working group include: Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX), chairwoman of the working group, Chairman Bob Goodlatte (VA), Chairman Michael McCaul (TX), Chairman John Carter (TX), Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart (FL), Congressman Steve Pearce (NM), and Congressman Matt Salmon (AZ).

“As the Speaker’s working group to address the crisis at the southern border we are extremely concerned over the well-being of children who cross our borders alone, as well as the integrity of our immigration laws. That is why the President must act to deter parents from encouraging their children to make this horrific and perilous journey based on the hope that they will be able to stay in the United States. The policies of the current Administration have created the crisis we are currently facing at our southern border and it will take Presidential action to solve it.

“We agree with the President that they must be returned to their home countries in the most humane way possible and that will require a revision of the 2008 Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act. In addition, the FY 2015 appropriations process is already under way in the House which addresses resources related to the current crisis. The substantial increase of family units and unaccompanied children crossing the border has created an enormous strain on Customs and Border Protection as well as the border states and communities. It is critical we ensure that the Border Patrol is able to focus on protecting the borders of the United States.

“Over the next several days we will review the facts and continue to gather on-the-ground information in order to develop a series of recommendations regarding actions the Administration can take within its authority as well as legislative solutions for the Congress to consider to address this crisis.”

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Granger Statement Regarding White House Emergency Funding Request for the Southern Border

2014/07/08

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12), Chairwoman of the House Working Group to address the humanitarian crisis at the southern border, issued the following statement regarding the White House emergency funding request for the southern border.

“I, along with the members of the Appropriations Committee and working group, look forward to reviewing the White House supplemental request to address the humanitarian and national security crisis at the southern border. After two visits to the Texas-Mexico border and detention facilities around Texas last week, I saw firsthand how dire the situation is for the thousands of unaccompanied minors who are making the dangerous journey from Central American to the U.S. border. The huge increase of unaccompanied children crossing the border has created an enormous strain on the Border Patrol as well as the Texas Department of Public Safety and its vital to their missions that they are provided with the resources they need to protect the southern border.   “The Speaker's working group will meet again tomorrow to discuss the humanitarian, security, and immigration issues surrounding the situation at the southern border, as well as the policy steps we believe Congress and the Administration should take provide solutions to this immediate crisis."

Over the last week, Granger has visited a bus station in Laredo, TX that is providing shelter and aid for dozens of family units every day while they await transportation to take them to locations across the country to appear before an immigration court; the Customs and Border Patrol facility in McAllen, TX where hundreds of unaccompanied minors and family units are apprehended while they await to be processed through the system; and Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, TX that is serving as a temporary shelter and processing center for thousands of unaccompanied minors.

Granger also participated in Chairman Michael McCaul’s Homeland Security Committee field hearing that was held in McAllen, TX last week. On Monday, Granger toured and met with officials at Catholic Charities Fort Worth who have provided shelter and aid for approximately 200 unaccompanied children to date.

The Working Group will provide the first update to the House GOP Conference on July 15, 2014.

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My Trip to the Southern Border

2014/07/02

Dear Friend,

Over the weekend, I traveled to South Texas and the Rio Grande Valley to see for myself the humanitarian crisis that is unfolding along the border in Texas.

I visited a bus station in Laredo that is providing shelter and aid for dozens of mothers and children every day while they await transportation to take them to locations all across the country to appear before an immigration court. This process is supported by contributions and using volunteers working 12 hours shifts by the local Catholic Churches. Then I toured the Customs and Border Patrol facility in McAllen where hundreds of unaccompanied children and others with their mothers are detained while they await to be processed through the system. I also visited Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio that is serving as a temporary shelter and processing center for 1,200 unaccompanied minors.

Despite the President’s claims this is not about immigration reform. This is about managing the immediate humanitarian crisis that this country faces at the Texas-Mexico border. This is about making a priority the thousands of children who have made a horrific journey based on false hope that they will be able to stay in the United States.

I saw firsthand the humanitarian efforts that are underway by Customs and Border Patrol agents, local officials and community non-profits who are all overwhelmed by the daily volume of unaccompanied minors and family units who have been apprehended at the border. Throughout my visit one message was clear; please don’t call this an immigration reform issue, this is a humanitarian crisis and we need help now.

The House Working Group that was created by Speaker Boehner, and that I have been appointed to lead, has heeded the call to action and is working to provide immediate recommendations to help those on the ground who are facing this crisis every hour of the day.

I will be returning to the Rio Grande Valley on Thursday, as part of this effort, to continue to meet with officials to hear directly from them what solutions can be developed to end this crisis.

As I continue to work on this issue, I will keep you updated.  

Sincerely,   Kay Granger

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Granger Statement Regarding Ongoing Humanitarian Crisis at Southern Border

2014/07/02

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12), Chairwoman of the House Working Group to address the humanitarian crisis at the southern border, issued the following statement regarding the ongoing crisis at the Texas-Mexico border.

Over the weekend, Granger visited a bus station in Laredo, TX that is providing shelter and aid for dozens of family units every day while they await transportation to take them to locations across the country to appear before an immigration court; the Customs and Border Patrol facility in McAllen, TX where hundreds of unaccompanied minors and family units are apprehended while they await to be processed through the system; and Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, TX that is serving as a temporary shelter and processing center for thousands of unaccompanied minors. The Working Group will provide the first update to the House GOP Conference on July 15, 2014.

“The humanitarian crisis at the southern border demands to be treated with the seriousness that it deserves. Despite the President’s claims, this is not about immigration reform, this is about managing the immediate humanitarian crisis that this country faces at the Texas-Mexico border. This is about making a priority the thousands of children who have made a horrific journey based on false hope that they will be able to stay in the United States.

“I just returned from a trip to South Texas and the Rio Grande Valley. I saw firsthand the humanitarian efforts that are underway by Customs and Border Patrol agents, local officials and community non-profits who are all overwhelmed by the daily volume of unaccompanied minors and family units who have been apprehended at the border. Throughout my visit one message was clear - please don’t call this an immigration reform issue, this is a humanitarian crisis and we need help now.

“The House Working Group that was created by Speaker Boehner has heeded this call to action and is working to provide immediate recommendations to help those on the ground who are facing this crisis every hour of the day. I will be returning to the Rio Grande Valley on Thursday to continue to meet with officials to hear directly from them on what solutions can be developed to end this crisis.”

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Contact Information

1026 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-5071
Fax 202-225-5683
kaygranger.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Appropriations

A former teacher, small business owner and Mayor of Fort Worth, Congresswoman Kay Granger was first elected to represent the 12th congressional district of Texas in 1997.  Earning a reputation for pragmatic leadership and serving as a powerful voice for Texas values, Kay fervently fights for the issues that matter most to Texas’ 12th congressional district and our country.

Since arriving in the U.S. House of Representatives, Kay has distinguished herself as one of the most recognized and influential leaders on defense and foreign policy – an expertise she began developing as the Mayor of Fort Worth, which is home to the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base and Lockheed Martin.  As a senior member of the powerful Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, she has continually strengthened the 12th District’s contribution to America’s defense system and supported efforts to provide for our women and men in uniform – both on the battlefield and when they return home from combat.

In 2012, Kay stood with Governor Rick Perry and members of the 136th Airlift Wing of the Texas Air National Guard to fight a costly and unnecessary Air Force proposal that looked to move Texas’ prized C-130 squadron to Montana.  To the Air Force, Texans, and the millions of Americans who depend on the C-130 aircraft to respond to natural disaster emergencies, Kay delivered a powerful message:  C-130s will not be moved without a fight.  Thanks to her work as well as that of Governor Perry, Senator Cornyn, Senator Hutchinson and the entire Texas delegation, the C-130’s stayed where they are needed and where they belong:  Fort Worth.

Kay has long believed that national security and foreign policy go hand in hand.  As the top Republican on the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee, she has worked to increase global stability and security as well enrich the lives of millions in the developing world through efforts that center on bettering global health, improving the lives of women and teaching emerging democracies how to sustain newly-discovered freedoms.

Kay is also a Majority Deputy Whip and serves on the Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development.

In recognition of her achievements, Kay has received the Air Force Foundation Award and the Marine Corps’ Semper Fidelis Award.  She has also been honored with the Tax Fighter Award by the National Tax Limitation Committee and the Spirit of Enterprise Award by the U.S. Chamber of Congress.  Additionally, the National Association of Manufacturers has recognized her for her pro-growth, pro-worker voting record.  For a full list of the awards she’s received, please click here.

Born in Greenville, TX, Kay was raised in Fort Worth.  Majoring in education, Kay – a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution – graduated from Texas Wesleyan University and became a high school journalism and English teacher.  In 1978, she opened her own insurance agency and operated it for over 20 years, leading her to become the first woman inducted into the Fort Worth Business Hall of Fame.  In 1991, she was elected as the first female Mayor of Fort Worth where she cut crime by 49 percent and led the city to win the coveted All-American City Award.  Kay, who attends the First United Methodist Church in Fort Worth, is a mother of three and a proud grandmother to five.


Serving With

Louie Gohmert

TEXAS' 1st DISTRICT

Ted Poe

TEXAS' 2nd DISTRICT

Sam Johnson

TEXAS' 3rd DISTRICT

Ralph Hall

TEXAS' 4th DISTRICT

Jeb Hensarling

TEXAS' 5th DISTRICT

Joe Barton

TEXAS' 6th DISTRICT

John Culberson

TEXAS' 7th DISTRICT

Kevin Brady

TEXAS' 8th DISTRICT

Michael McCaul

TEXAS' 10th DISTRICT

Michael Conaway

TEXAS' 11th DISTRICT

Mac Thornberry

TEXAS' 13th DISTRICT

Randy Weber

TEXAS' 14th DISTRICT

Bill Flores

TEXAS' 17th DISTRICT

Randy Neugebauer

TEXAS' 19th DISTRICT

Lamar Smith

TEXAS' 21st DISTRICT

Pete Olson

TEXAS' 22nd DISTRICT

Kenny Marchant

TEXAS' 24th DISTRICT

Roger Williams

TEXAS' 25th DISTRICT

Michael Burgess

TEXAS' 26th DISTRICT

Blake Farenthold

TEXAS' 27th DISTRICT

John Carter

TEXAS' 31st DISTRICT

Pete Sessions

TEXAS' 32nd DISTRICT

Steve Stockman

TEXAS' 36th DISTRICT

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