Kay Granger

Kay Granger

TEXAS' 12th DISTRICT

Ted Cruz and other GOP Texans slam Obama’s Cuba shift

2014/12/17

WASHINGTON – Sen. Ted Cruz has joined the chorus of Republicans blasting the president’s shift in policy toward Cuba, a country from which the senator’s father fled as a teenager.

“Fidel and Raul Castro have just received both international legitimacy and a badly-needed economic lifeline from President Obama,” Cruz said in a prepared statement issued 4 hours after the president’s announcement at the White House. “But they remain in control of a totalitarian police state modeled on their old state sponsor, the Soviet Union.”

“This is one more very, very bad deal brokered by the Obama administration,” said Cruz.

Like other critics weighing in this afternoon, the senator lauded the release of Alan Gross, the American aid worker imprisoned by Cuba for five years. But, he said, the deal Obama has struck won’t stop indefinite detention of others without legal process, “as the many political prisoners still languishing in the Castros’ prisons can attest.”

Cruz echoed comments from Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, another Cuban American Republican eyeing a 2016 presidential bid.

He called it a mistake to ease tensions with a nation that retains ties with Russia, Iran, North Korea and Venezuela, and which supports terrorists groups – he cited FARC, Hezbollah and Hamas. Making nice with Cuba, Russia and Iran, he said, leaves American “influence diminished and our enemies emboldened. Now they are revisiting this same disastrous policy with the Castros, blind to the fact that they are being played by brutal dictators whose only goal is maintaining power.”

Rep. Kay Granger, R-Fort Worth, who chairs a subcommittee that controls billions in foreign aid, also criticized the moves, which include normalizing diplomatic relations, and easing restrictions on travel, banking and trade. These are “deeply concerning,” she said.

“The Cuban people remain under the iron grip of a regime that has for decades repressed their freedoms. The Cuban regime should not be rewarded until the Cuban people are given the freedoms they are seeking. The regime has had a sordid history of human rights abuses in addition to working with some of America’s worst enemies around the world,” Granger said. “These actions cannot be erased overnight or forgotten as the Administration seeks to shift the U.S. relationship with the government of Cuba.

http://trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com/2014/12/ted-cruz-and-other-gop-texans-slam-obamas-cuba-shift.html/

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Granger Statement on U.S.-Cuban Policy Shift, Release of Alan Gross

2014/12/17

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12), chairwoman of the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations subcommittee, issued the following statement regarding the Obama Administration’s announcement to shift U.S.-Cuban diplomatic relations and the release of a U.S. humanitarian aid worker from Cuba.  

“I am relieved that American aid worker Alan Gross is safely back in the U.S. after being unjustly imprisoned for years, but the policy changes announced today by the Obama Administration are deeply concerning.

“The Cuban people remain under the iron grip of a regime that has for decades repressed their freedoms. The Cuban regime should not be rewarded until the Cuban people are given the freedoms they are seeking. The regime has had a sordid history of human rights abuses in addition to working with some of America’s worst enemies around the world. These actions cannot be erased overnight or forgotten as the Administration seeks to shift the U.S. relationship with the government of Cuba.

“Changing the U.S. diplomatic relationship with Cuba should not be a unilateral decision made solely by this Administration. Congress has a vital role to play in our country’s foreign policy and how American taxpayer dollars are used.”

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Star-Telegram: Granger: DNA can stem trafficking

2014/12/16

This past summer, tens of thousands of unaccompanied children from Central America were crossing the Texas-Mexico border.

One of the challenges of this crisis is ensuring that when the children are sent back to Central America, that they are returned to an actual family member and not a human trafficker or other predator.

I witnessed this challenge firsthand as I traveled to the border as the chairwoman of the House Working Group to address this crisis.

One promising solution has emerged from a DNA expert in North Texas with decades of experience running a crime lab, identifying human remains and reuniting missing children with their parents.

Arthur Eisenberg, who co-directs the Center for Human Identification at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, has a two-part plan: to set up a DNA database from samples obtained from migrant children who have reached the Texas border and to establish a second database of samples from parents or family members with missing or abducted children.

When a match occurs, authorities can have a reasonable level of confidence that these children are being reunited with family members.

This plan for unaccompanied migrant children is an extension of Eisenberg’s already successful DNA Prokids program, which returned 13 Haitian children to their families after they were kidnapped and taken to Bolivia in the wake of Haiti’s devastating earthquake in 2010.

He already has agreements in place with like-minded colleagues and government officials in Honduras, El Salvador, Mexico and Guatemala to get DNA samples from relatives and to establish databases there.

Innovative ideas such as these, which have law enforcement and humanitarian applications, are why I helped ensure that funding is available in the omnibus bill passed by Congress last week for DNA forensic technology programs.

This can be used to reunite children with their family members in Central America and to continue the fight against human trafficking.

In the new law, there is a provision to instruct the State Department to work with countries in Central America to utilize DNA forensic science and databases and to strengthen regional cooperation in combating human trafficking.

I expect these efforts will include collaboration with local law enforcement, civil society and academic institutions, as well as leverage investments from the private sector.

Worldwide, Eisenberg’s program has collected and processed almost 11,000 samples in 15 countries, resulting in 724 children being returned to their families and preventing more than 200 illegal adoptions.

Because human trafficking spans nations and exists on nearly every continent, it’s easy to pass it off as an international problem without local implications. But such assumptions are wrong.

The FBI estimates that there are more than 100,000 children in the United States being trafficked in the sex trade or working in forced labor or debt-bondage conditions.

North Texas has been identified as a central hub for traffickers moving victims through the Interstate 35 corridor, and Houston and El Paso have been cited by the Justice Department as two cities in the U.S. where trafficking is most prominent.

DNA forensic science and DNA databases have unique capabilities to confirm identities and have proven to be effective in deterring and preventing human trafficking in Central America, Mexico and the United States.

It is an increasingly effective weapon in a rapidly expanding arsenal.

Human trafficking isn’t just a Texas problem, but I’m proud that we’ve found some Texas solutions in Fort Worth to help fight it.

U.S. Rep. Kay Granger of Fort Worth has served the 12th Congressional District since 1997 and is a member of the House Appropriations Committee.

http://www.star-telegram.com/opinion/opn-columns-blogs/other-voices/article4520841.html#storylink=cpy

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Funding the Government

2014/12/01

Dear Friend,

Do you think our military men and women deserve a pay raise? Do you think Congress should take action to stop funding for harmful EPA regulations? I do and that is why it is important for Congress to pass an omnibus appropriations bill before the end of the year.

Congress has to decide how to fund the government after December 11th, when the current funding measure expires, and there are two approaches Congress can take - passing an omnibus appropriations bill or passing a short-term continuing resolution. I want to briefly explain the differences.

An omnibus is a bill that includes funding for the government until the end of the fiscal year and wraps all twelve separate appropriations bills into one. On the other hand, a continuing resolution keeps the federal government funded at the same level as it is now and for a shorter period of time forcing Congress to come back to the issue again and again instead of making the tough decisions and looking ahead to the next fiscal year. By supporting a continuing resolution, we would be saying the world is the way it was last year and that is not the case.

An omnibus reflects the work the Appropriations Committee has done all year to closely examine programs funded by the government and prioritize the programs that have worked efficiently, while making cuts to inefficient or redundant programs. For example, by passing an omnibus we would fulfill our commitment to fund the authorized pay raise for our men and women in uniform and provide much needed funding for customs and border protection to carry out their critical border security efforts. Additionally, we restrict funding for programs that implement harmful EPA regulations and increase funding for the Federal Bureau of Investigation for priorities such as stopping cyber-crimes, gangs, and human trafficking. These are just a few of the many decisions that would be lost in a continuing resolution.

The American people want the Congress to function so we can make the difficult decisions that must be made to get our fiscal house in order. This can’t be done if we are lurching from one short-term continuing resolution to another every few months.  

Sincerely, Kay Granger

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U.S. officials call on Congo to release adopted children

2014/11/30

Congressional leaders haven’t forgotten about hundreds of children halfway around the world, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, who can’t go home.

They have sent letters to Congolese officials, imploring them to let children who have been adopted by people in the U.S. and other countries finally go to their forever families.

But the Congolese leaders haven’t issued exit papers for more than a year, leaving hundreds of children in limbo.

Nearly 200 members of Congress — including Republican U.S. Sens. John Cornyn and Ted Cruz and U.S. Reps. Kay Granger of Fort Worth, Kenny Marchant of Coppell, Roger Williams of Austin and Democrat U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey of Fort Worth — signed a recent letter.

“Some of these children have remained separated from their legal parents for over a year waiting for this final departure permission,” the congressional letter states. “Tragically, some of these children have died while waiting for exit permission, and others are very ill and need immediate medical attention.

“We hope that you will agree that swift action is necessary to prevent further loss of innocent lives and the continued suffering and distress for the children and their legal parents.”

One potentially encouraging sign is that a few of the children in limbo who have medical conditions so severe that they could die — such as HIV or heart or lung defects — have been given exit letters so they can get medical attention.

Earlier this month, Andrea and Chris Stewart of Florida successfully brought their 10-month-old adoptive son, Cruz, home from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Cruz needs major surgery because of heart and lung malformations.

“We are beyond blessed with the honor of being Cruz’s family,” according to a statement from the Stewarts. “For now, we will focus on his health and where the next steps take us into caring for orphans around the world.”

Last September, the Democratic Republic of the Congo stopped issuing exit papers after hearing reports that some children from Congo might have been abused by their adoptive families or adopted by other people once they left their homeland, according to the State Department.

“Congolese officials have informed us on several occasions that the suspension was prompted in part by weaknesses in Congolese adoption procedures, which they believe may not adequately protect children,” according to a statement on the State Department’s website. “The suspension was imposed on all inter-country adoptions of Congolese children by prospective/adoptive parents from all countries, not just adoptions by United States prospective/adoptive parents.”

Ongoing talks

Congolese officials haven’t said when they will resume issuing the papers.

President Joseph Kabila has said the suspension can’t be lifted until the Parliament passes new adoption laws. And although he and other Congolese leaders appear receptive to new adoption laws, there are no such proposals on the table.

Congressional members’ staffs have met with DRC National Assembly members, who have said they need to make sure children in their country are safe — no matter where they are.

A U.S. Department of State delegation is expected to travel to Kinshasa this month to meet with officials.

“We remain committed to ensuring that federal laws in the U.S. continue to protect all children against abuse and neglect and to appropriately punish any persons who violate these laws,” the congressional letter states. “We respectfully request that the Congolese National Assembly and Senate prioritize legislation that strengthens the Congolese intercountry adoption process.

“This legislation would ensure that intercountry adoptions of Congolese children can be completed in an honest, ethical manner and that the children who are currently waiting to be united with their legal parents can finally benefit from living with the security of a permanent, loving family.”

Congo adoptions

A number of U.S. residents have turned to Congo in recent years for adoption because of the great and growing need there.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo is the second-largest country in Africa, but millions died in a civil war more than a decade ago. Poverty, armed conflict and other problems have taken a toll on the Congolese population, which includes more than 4 million orphaned children.

There, 1 in 7 children dies before turning 5. Fewer than half who survive have access to clean water, nearly one-fourth are underweight, and nearly half aren’t vaccinated for common childhood diseases, according to UNICEF research.

Even so, State Department officials are “strongly” recommending against anyone beginning an adoption in the DRC now.

An online petition that so far has been signed by more than 117,000 people also encourages U.S. officials — including Secretary of State John Kerry — to “take a personal interest in resolving this situation.”

“Every day that passes, these waiting children are being damaged,” the petition reads. “They need a solution now!”

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Granger to continue as subcommittee chair

2014/11/26

Congresswoman Kay Granger, whose district includes the eastern half of Wise County, will remain chair of the House State and Foreign Operations Appropriations subcommittee.

Granger will also remain vice chair of the Defense subcommittee. In January, when the new Congress convenes, she will become the fourth highest ranking Republican on the committee and the highest ranking Republican woman on the committee.

“I look forward to continuing the vital work of overseeing all U.S. foreign investments and working to ensure we maintain a robust national defense to meet the needs of the United States and our allies,” Granger said. “Over the last four years as the chair of the subcommittee, I am proud of our efforts to prioritize the programs that have worked efficiently, while making cuts to inefficient or redundant programs. In the process, we have made the State and Foreign Operations budget leaner, but more effective.

“The world is a very complicated place today, and the U.S. faces some of the most difficult foreign policy and national security challenges in our history,” she said. “Our investments in our defense and foreign policy must reflect the seriousness of these challenges and exhibit strong U.S. leadership aboard.

“We must continue to have aggressive oversight and constantly assess the success of our foreign assistance,” she added. “We must also continue to make smart investments and be responsible stewards of taxpayer funds.”

The State and Foreign Operations subcommittee plays a critical role in U.S. national security policy. From supporting key allies like Israel, funding embassy security, addressing the spread of Ebola and stopping the spread of global terrorism, Granger oversees many of the key programs that invest in the protection of the homeland.

The Defense subcommittee ensures the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force have the resources they need to ensure military supremacy in the world. With the Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, the development of Lockheed Martin’s F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, the building of Bell Helicopter’s V-22 Osprey, and many other important defense companies based in the 12th District and throughout North Texas, the communities Granger represents makes enormous contributions to America’s security at home and abroad.

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Congress nears deal to avoid tax increases, Obama vows veto

2014/11/26

WASHINGTON — Congressional leaders appeared near a deal late Tuesday to renew some $450 billion in tax deductions cherished by consumers, citizens and companies alike, including a long-standing sales tax deduction for Texans.

The White House called it a bad deal and vowed a veto, though it faces a tougher Congress in January when Republicans take over the Senate.

The deal was being hammered out by two leaders soon to leave their positions of power: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., who will become minority leader when the Republicans take over the Senate in January, and Rep. Dave Camp, the Michigan Republican who heads the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee through the end of the year.

President Barack Obama signaled he’d reject the pending deal between lame-duck leaders because it would make permanent big items on the Republican wish list while only temporarily extending two measures that he wants to make permanent — the Child Tax Credit and the Earned Income Tax Credit, a tax break for working families that is set to expire in 2017.

“The president would veto the proposed deal because it would provide permanent tax breaks to help well-connected corporations while neglecting working families,” said White House Deputy Press Secretary Jennifer Friedman.

Other Democrats also attacked the deal being negotiated by their own Senate majority leader.

“We need to grow the middle class, not punish those working hard to get by while always giving preferences and priority treatment to big corporations who can hire high-priced, well-funded lobbyists,” said Rep. Chris Van Hollen of Maryland, the top Democrat on the House Budget Committee.

Millions of Americans face tax increases if Congress and the president cannot agree to extend a slew of expiring tax breaks. Some of the popular or visible tax deductions hanging in the balance are:

• A $4,000 deduction of higher-education expenses for middle-income Americans.

• A $250 deduction for elementary and secondary school teachers for school supplies.

• A tax deduction for companies, farms and restaurants that donate food to charities.

• The three-year tax depreciation for racehorses.

• A tax write-off for the first $15 million spent on film and television production.

• The seven-year depreciation for land improvements and support facilities at motorsports complexes.

Sales taxes

One of the most closely watched items is the itemized deduction for state and local general sales taxes for taxpayers in seven states that don’t tax income. They are Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming. Tennessee and New Hampshire tax only dividend and interest income.

Taxpayers in states without income tax have been able to take a standard deduction based on size of family and income, or to itemize their deductions. It’s a potentially a large deduction when there’s the purchase of a vehicle, boat or large home appliances and furniture.

“I think a lot of people don’t really realize it . . . a lot of them don’t know they can take the deduction,” said Lewis Leatherman, a veteran accountant in Saginaw. “It’s not something that gets a lot of publicity.”

Several Republican members of Texas’ congressional delegation — including Sen. John Cornyn, Rep. Kay Granger of Fort Worth and Rep. Kevin Brady of The Woodlands — have helped lead the charge to make the sales tax deduction permanent.

Brady has argued repeatedly that it’s a matter of “tax fairness” for Texans and people in other affected states. “The state and local sales tax deduction has helped Texas taxpayers save nearly $10 billion in federal taxes since we restored the deduction in 2004. We shouldn’t let them lapse or delay them into 2015,” he said earlier this month.

Many Democrats back the measure, too, including Rep. Marc Veasey of Fort Worth, who said he’s hopeful a deal will be struck. “This is an important issue for the Metroplex and I will work diligently with my House colleagues to see it through,” Veasey said.

The Senate in April passed a two-year bill to renew, extend or create 62 tax deductions. The House of Representatives, working on its own bill, identified six or seven deductions that could be made permanent.

But talks shifted after November’s elections, a problem for corporations that make hiring and investment decisions based on the tax code they expect.

“Some of members have gone ahead and made investments … there are others that are holding off, waiting to see what happens,” said Dorothy Coleman, vice president of tax policy for the National Association of Manufacturers. “For the people who have invested, not extending these [deductions] is going to amount to a tax increase. And if you don’t extend it, the people who are holding off investments might not make them, which is not good for the economy, either.”

One clear area of discontent was tax credits for energy produced through wind power.

The Center for American Prosperity, founded by the conservative billionaires David and Charles Koch, took out ads this week targeting certain House Republicans and asking constituents to contact their lawmaker in opposition to the tax break for wind energy. The Reid-Camp deal would phase out subsidies enjoyed by wind energy producers over a period of four years.

NASCAR tax credits

Heritage Action, the political arm of the conservative Heritage Foundation, wants a broader set of tax breaks eliminated.

“Things like the wind, NASCAR tax credits, we don’t think have any business being there,” said Dan Holler, a Heritage Action spokesman. “The same extenders package we see time and time again, and we think it’s bad policy.”

One company with much potentially at stake with the so-called NASCAR tax credit is the International Speedway Corp. in Daytona Beach, Fla.

“We do understand Congress is making final decisions about tax extenders, and our hope is that they will act and preserve the tax treatment the motorsports industry has used for decades,” said Gentry Baumline-Robinson, International Speedway’s chief spokeswoman.

Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/2014/11/26/6319844/congress-nears-deal-to-avoid-tax.html#storylink=cp Read More

President Obama's Immigration Executive Actions

2014/11/21

Dear Friend,

I am disappointed and deeply concerned with President Obama’s decision to take executive action to change our nation’s immigration laws. This is an unprecedented abuse of the executive authority for which there is no basis in the rule of law. President Obama has even stated in the past that such actions would not be an appropriate use of constitutional authority.

A decision to affect immigration reform via executive action circumvents the legislative process and ignores the framework our founders set up. By taking the actions that he outlined last night, President Obama has already placed in jeopardy his relationship with the newly elected Congress before it has been sworn-in and just weeks after the November elections.

It is absolutely necessary for President Obama to work with the new Congress to address the issue of immigration reform. We need real solutions, not a quick fix. The president’s plan to take unilateral action is not an effective, long-term solution to our broken system.

I believe any discussion about immigration reform has to begin with border security and enforcement of current immigration law. One of the fundamental responsibilities of the federal government is to protect the homeland and that begins with knowing exactly who is coming in and out of the country.

Sincerely, Kay Granger

By the way, earlier this week, I signed a letter to President Obama urging him to work with the newly elected Congress on immigration reform instead of taking executive action. To read the full letter, click here.

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Appropriators to PA President Abbas: End Incitement

2014/11/21

Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-NY), Ranking Member of the House Appropriations Committee and State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee, Congressman Harold Rogers (R-KY), Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, and Kay Granger (R-TX), Chairwoman of the State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee, today wrote Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas to urge decisive and constructive actions to stop incitement of terrorist attacks against Israel.

Full text:

November 20, 2014

His Excellency Mahmoud Abbas Chairman of the PLO Executive Committee President of the Palestinian National Authority Al Muqata'a, Ramallah West Bank

Dear Mr. President:

We write regarding the recent series of deplorable terrorist attacks against innocent Israelis.  We are profoundly concerned that the cycle of violent behavior threatens to spiral even further out of control.  The situation clearly demands leadership, and we implore you to take decisive steps to stop the incitement and spread of violence.  

For more than two decades, the U.S. Congress has been a strong partner in building the institutions that will someday govern an independent Palestinian state, existing side-by-side, in peace and security, with Israel.  That is why we have supported billions of dollars in assistance for technical training on security matters, economic development, and humanitarian needs of the Palestinians.       However, this aid is predicated on the Palestinian Authority’s commitment to countering terrorism and pursuing a comprehensive peace with Israel.  U.S. law also clearly stipulates that the Palestinian Authority must act to counter the incitement of violence against Israelis in order to continue receiving U.S. assistance.

The recent attacks against Israelis raise serious concerns that the Palestinians are not prepared to coexist peacefully with their neighbor Israel.  In addition, the use of degrading images in Fatah or PA produced media as well as inflammatory language used by you and other Palestinian leaders undermine the objectives of our support and threaten to further destabilize an already highly volatile situation.  

As the Chairman and Ranking Member of the House Appropriations Committee and the Chairwoman of the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee, we remain resolute in our commitment to these conditions.  That is why we urge you to take constructive actions and return to direct negotiations with Israel, which will provide the only path to a viable and durable two-state agreement resulting in security, prosperity, and peace for both sides.

Thank you for your attention to this critical matter, and we look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

Nita Lowey Ranking Member, Committee on Appropriations

Harold Rogers Chairman, Committee on Appropriations

Kay Granger Chairwoman, Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations & Related Programs

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Granger Responds to President Obama’s Planned Immigration Executive Actions

2014/11/21

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Kay Granger (TX-12) issued the following statement regarding President Obama’s planned immigration executive actions that he outlined in a speech this evening.

“I am disappointed and deeply concerned with President Obama’s decision to take executive action to change our nation’s immigration laws. This is an unprecedented abuse of the executive authority for which there is no basis in the rule of law. President Obama has even stated in the past that such actions would not be an appropriate use of constitutional authority.

“A decision to affect immigration reform via executive action circumvents the legislative process and ignores the framework our founders setup. By taking the actions that he outlined tonight, President Obama has already placed in jeopardy his relationship with the newly elected Congress before it has been sworn-in and just weeks after the November elections.

“It is absolutely necessary for President Obama to work with the new Congress to address the issue of immigration reform. We need real solutions, not a quick fix. The president’s plan to take unilateral action is not an effective long-term solution to our broken system. I believe any discussion about immigration reform has to begin with border security and enforcement of current immigration law. One of the fundamental responsibilities of the federal government is to protect the homeland and that begins with knowing exactly who is coming in and out of the country.”

On Wednesday, November 19th, Granger signed a letter to President Obama urging him to work with the newly elected Congress on immigration reform instead of taking executive action. To read the full letter, click here.

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Contact Information

1026 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-5071
Fax 202-225-5683
kaygranger.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Appropriations

A former teacher, small business owner and Mayor of Fort Worth, Congresswoman Kay Granger was first elected to represent the 12th congressional district of Texas in 1997.  Earning a reputation for pragmatic leadership and serving as a powerful voice for Texas values, Kay fervently fights for the issues that matter most to Texas’ 12th congressional district and our country.

Since arriving in the U.S. House of Representatives, Kay has distinguished herself as one of the most recognized and influential leaders on defense and foreign policy – an expertise she began developing as the Mayor of Fort Worth, which is home to the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base and Lockheed Martin.  As a senior member of the powerful Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, she has continually strengthened the 12th District’s contribution to America’s defense system and supported efforts to provide for our women and men in uniform – both on the battlefield and when they return home from combat.

In 2012, Kay stood with Governor Rick Perry and members of the 136th Airlift Wing of the Texas Air National Guard to fight a costly and unnecessary Air Force proposal that looked to move Texas’ prized C-130 squadron to Montana.  To the Air Force, Texans, and the millions of Americans who depend on the C-130 aircraft to respond to natural disaster emergencies, Kay delivered a powerful message:  C-130s will not be moved without a fight.  Thanks to her work as well as that of Governor Perry, Senator Cornyn, Senator Hutchinson and the entire Texas delegation, the C-130’s stayed where they are needed and where they belong:  Fort Worth.

Kay has long believed that national security and foreign policy go hand in hand.  As the top Republican on the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee, she has worked to increase global stability and security as well enrich the lives of millions in the developing world through efforts that center on bettering global health, improving the lives of women and teaching emerging democracies how to sustain newly-discovered freedoms.

Kay is also a Majority Deputy Whip and serves on the Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development.

In recognition of her achievements, Kay has received the Air Force Foundation Award and the Marine Corps’ Semper Fidelis Award.  She has also been honored with the Tax Fighter Award by the National Tax Limitation Committee and the Spirit of Enterprise Award by the U.S. Chamber of Congress.  Additionally, the National Association of Manufacturers has recognized her for her pro-growth, pro-worker voting record.  For a full list of the awards she’s received, please click here.

Born in Greenville, TX, Kay was raised in Fort Worth.  Majoring in education, Kay – a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution – graduated from Texas Wesleyan University and became a high school journalism and English teacher.  In 1978, she opened her own insurance agency and operated it for over 20 years, leading her to become the first woman inducted into the Fort Worth Business Hall of Fame.  In 1991, she was elected as the first female Mayor of Fort Worth where she cut crime by 49 percent and led the city to win the coveted All-American City Award.  Kay, who attends the First United Methodist Church in Fort Worth, is a mother of three and a proud grandmother to five.


Serving With

Louie Gohmert

TEXAS' 1st DISTRICT

Ted Poe

TEXAS' 2nd DISTRICT

Sam Johnson

TEXAS' 3rd DISTRICT

Ralph Hall

TEXAS' 4th DISTRICT

Jeb Hensarling

TEXAS' 5th DISTRICT

Joe Barton

TEXAS' 6th DISTRICT

John Culberson

TEXAS' 7th DISTRICT

Kevin Brady

TEXAS' 8th DISTRICT

Michael McCaul

TEXAS' 10th DISTRICT

Michael Conaway

TEXAS' 11th DISTRICT

Mac Thornberry

TEXAS' 13th DISTRICT

Randy Weber

TEXAS' 14th DISTRICT

Bill Flores

TEXAS' 17th DISTRICT

Randy Neugebauer

TEXAS' 19th DISTRICT

Lamar Smith

TEXAS' 21st DISTRICT

Pete Olson

TEXAS' 22nd DISTRICT

Kenny Marchant

TEXAS' 24th DISTRICT

Roger Williams

TEXAS' 25th DISTRICT

Michael Burgess

TEXAS' 26th DISTRICT

Blake Farenthold

TEXAS' 27th DISTRICT

John Carter

TEXAS' 31st DISTRICT

Pete Sessions

TEXAS' 32nd DISTRICT

Steve Stockman

TEXAS' 36th DISTRICT

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