Jim Sensenbrenner

Jim Sensenbrenner


Sensenbrenner’s Application Deadline for Service Academy Nominations is October 15


Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner reiterated today that the deadline for submitting applications for nominations to attend the United States Air Force, Military, Naval, or Merchant Marine Academies for the 2016-2017 academic year is Thursday, October 15. Late or incomplete applications will not be considered.

Eligible applicants are United States citizens with residency in Wisconsin’s Fifth Congressional District.  They must be at least 17 years old but not past their 23rd birthday as of July 1, 2016, and must have reached their senior year of high school.

After October 15th, candidates will be contacted by a member of the Congressman’s Academy Selection Committee to schedule an interview. The interview is an assessment of the candidate’s leadership potential, character, motivation, and interests.

Congressman Sensenbrenner: “I urge interested Fifth District high school students to get their academy applications in to my district office as soon as possible.  Any application received after the October 15th deadline will not be considered.  My Academy Selection Committee will interview eligible candidates and then make their recommendations to me.  The selection process is an exciting time of year and I look forward to learning about the young, outstanding leaders from the Fifth District.”

Congressman Sensenbrenner’s district office is located at 120 Bishops Way, Suite 154, Brookfield, WI  53005. Information is available by calling the office at 262-784-1111, or visiting the Congressman’s website at Sensenbrenner.house.gov. 
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Don’t Politicize a Message of Morality


It’s been an exciting week, particularly for Catholics in America. His Holiness, Pope Francis, became the first Pope to visit the United States of America, and it was an honor to be part of this historical milestone for our country.

During his time here, Pope Francis shared words of faith, charity, and goodwill. He inspired people young and old with his message of morality, and emphasized the importance of caring for others while extending our hands in love and friendship to the disadvantaged and less fortunate. 

In his address to Members of Congress yesterday, his words of peace included comments on some of the challenges we face today –comments that some politicians and advocates have wrongly politicized.

While I respect the Pope’s moral vision and sentiments of humanity, I don’t support the political tone that has been placed on his message. The citizens of the United States elect representatives to act on their behalf on matters of policy and law, and how we respond to the world’s challenges is a matter of prudential judgement, allocated to those elected policymakers.
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Service and Dedication Defined Speaker Boehner’s Congressional Career


Today, Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner released the following statement on the retirement of Speaker of the House John Boehner:

 Congressman Sensenbrenner: “As Speaker of the House, John Boehner led the Republican Party to its largest majorities since the 1920s, and in a contentious political atmosphere where it’s nearly impossible to achieve anything, he has done an exceptional job building relationships, bridging gaps, and passing meaningful and necessary legislation. Speaker Boehner’s congressional career has been one of dedicated service on behalf of his district, his party, and the American people, and he will be greatly missed. I thank him for his constant commitment to this nation and wish him well in his retirement.”

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Sensenbrenner: Don’t Politicize a Message of Morality


Today, Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner released the following statement on the Pope’s address to Congress:  

Congressman Sensenbrenner: “His Holiness, Pope Francis, came to the United States to share inspiring words of faith, charity, and goodwill. While his address to Members of Congress was a milestone in our nation’s history, it would be a mistake to politicize his message of morality. As elected representatives, we are entrusted by the people of this country to act on their behalf on issues of policy and law. While I respect the Pope’s moral vision, how we respond to the world’s challenges is a matter of prudential judgment allocated to elected policymakers.”
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Clyman Office Hours at 10:30am


Please join me at the Clyman Village Hall, located at 713 Morgan Street. Should you require special accommodations to attend, please contact my Brookfield office at (262) 784-1111 or (800) 242-1119. Read More

Fort Atkinson Town Hall Meeting at 9:00 AM


Please join me for a town hall meeting at Fort Atkinson City Hall, located at 101 N. Main Street. The meeting will be held in the Council Chambers on the 2nd floor. An elevator is available in the main lobby. Read More

The Judicial Redress Act is essential to U.S. law enforcement


America’s international allies are more important than ever, and smart diplomacy is critical to our national security. 

As we speak, the war in Syria is driving a mass migration across borders into Europe.  It is a humanitarian crisis, and there’s little question that virtually all of these people are innocent refugees in search of a better life. But we live in a dangerous world where even a handful of individuals can cause devastating harm. 

Terrorists like Al Qaeda and ISIS will not hesitate to exploit any opportunity to advance their agendas, and the current mass migration in Europe is one such opportunity. A European passport holder is a plane ticket from America. There is little that our immigration controls can do to prevent criminals or terrorists from entering the United States on short-term visas with European passports.
Because we justifiably refuse to live in a world where nations simply close their borders, we have to be vigilant. We need to know what our allies know and identify individuals who will do wrong. Information sharing and the sharing of law enforcement data between nations is, therefore, essential to law and order.

Against this backdrop, I authored and introduced the Judicial Redress Bill of 2015. In many ways, it’s a privacy bill—backed and supported by many of our country’s top privacy advocates—but make no mistake, the Judicial Redress Act is a crucial element to our law enforcement strategy. 

Trust is easily lost and hard to rebuild. As the original author of the USA FREEDOM Act, I saw firsthand the damage the Snowden leaks did to our international reputation. It is my hope that passage of the USA FREEDOM Act, and the unequivocal end to mass, suspicion-less surveillance in the United States, was a first step toward normalizing relations with our allies. But the Judicial Redress Act is an important second step.

The bill is essential to the implementation of a recently signed umbrella agreement between the United States and European Union. In the words of the agreement, “the purpose . . . is to ensure a high level of protection of personal information and enhance cooperation between the United States and the European Union and its Member States, in relation to the prevention, investigation, detection or prosecution of criminal offenses, including terrorism.”

In our complex digital world, privacy and security are not competing values. They are weaved together inseparably, and today’s policymakers must craft legal frameworks that support both.

The Judicial Redress Act of 2015 provides our closest allies with limited remedies relative to data they share with the United States similar to those Americans enjoy under the Privacy Act. It is a way to support our foreign allies and ensure continued sharing of law enforcement data. More specifically, the bill would give citizens of covered countries the ability to correct flawed information in their records—mistakes that could subject innocent people to criminal charges or unnecessary surveillance—and limited remedies in U.S. courts if the U.S. government fully and intentionally discloses their personal data. 

Americans already enjoy similar rights in Europe. Providing reciprocal rights is imperative to our international relationships. Our European allies have already indicated that such a bill is central to their willingness to continue to share law enforcement data with America. Failure to pass the Judicial Redress Act will therefore undermine several important international agreements, hurt U.S. businesses operating in Europe, and limit law enforcement sharing from key allies.

The bill is narrowly tailored, enabling only citizens of designated foreign countries to bring suit in specified circumstances, and only with respect to information obtained from their home country for law enforcement purposes. The right to redress is subject to the same restrictions U.S. citizens face under the Privacy Act, including broad exemptions for national security. 

Because of the issue’s importance, this bill enjoys broad support. It has been endorsed by the Department of Justice and federal law enforcement, as well as U.S. businesses, including the Chamber of Commerce and nearly all of our largest technology and information companies.

Continuing advancements in technology make it critical to increase our security efforts and continue building solid relationships with our allies. As part of our growing law enforcement strategy, as well as a sign of good faith to our international partners, we must past the Judicial Redress Act of 2015.

View this piece online here. Read More

Hartland Town Hall Meeting at 9:00am


Please join me at 9:00am at the Hartland Village Hall, located at 210 Cottonwood Avenue. Read More

Commemorating September 11, 2001


Fourteen years ago today, terrorists wreaked havoc on the United States of America, killing nearly 3000 of our fellow countrymen. The catastrophic events of that day were horrific, and from the moment the first plane hit the World Trade Center, we knew our lives would never be the same. 

But from that tragic day came an opportunity to support our neighbors, show love and compassion for those impacted, and unite together in a common cause of patriotism and kinship. 

There are no words to describe the depravity of the terrorist acts perpetrated on the United States the morning of September 11, 2001. The pain and heartache of the nation can still be felt today –we continue to mourn lives lost, support the families of victims, and pray for our service men and women who answered the call of duty in defense of our country. 

But the strength of the American people cannot be denied, and from that terrible tragedy we became further bonded in the ideals this land was founded on. We unite in remembrance and move forward together as a stronger, resolute nation. 
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Sensenbrenner Commemorates September 11th


Today, Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner released the following statement commemorating the anniversary of September 11, 2001:  

Congressman Sensenbrenner: “There are no words to describe the depravity of the terrorist acts perpetrated on the United States the morning of September 11, 2001. The pain and heartache of the nation can still be felt today –we continue to mourn lives lost, support the families of victims, and pray for our service men and women who answered the call of duty in defense of our country. But the strength of the American people cannot be denied, and from that terrible tragedy we became further bonded in the ideals this land was founded on. We unite in remembrance and move forward together as a stronger, resolute nation.” 
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Sensenbrenner Applauds Passage of Motorcyclists Safety Amendment


Today, the Science Subcommittee on Research and Technology marked up the Surface Transportation Research and Development Act of 2015. The Subcommittee passed two amendments that will help improve motorcyclist safety and protect taxpayer money.  

Mr. Sensenbrenner applauds Congressman Hultgren’s amendments, one of which will prevent the federal government from providing grants to state and local governments to create motorcycle-only checkpoints. It requires the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a study on the most effective means to prevent motorcycle crashes. 

The other amendment will prevent the Department of Transportation from using taxpayer money to lobby government officials. Mr. Sensenbrenner added this language to the Surface Transportation Research and Development Act of 1997 and is pleased that the Science Committee continues to work to protect American taxpayers.  

Congressman Sensenbrenner: “I am pleased the Subcommittee adopted these amendments to the Surface Transportation and Development Act, as they are necessary for the safety of our nation’s motorcyclists. The amendments promote motorcyclist safety through crash prevention programs, but they also protect American taxpayers by ensuring that the federal government doesn’t use tax dollars to lobby state governments. It’s a victory anytime we can limit the federal government’s interference in state affairs. It was a pleasure to work with Congressman Hultgren in advancing these amendments. I look forward to these common sense amendments being included in the next highway reauthorization bill.”
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Judicial Redress Act Final Step in Umbrella Agreement with EU


Today, negotiations between the United States of America and the European Union regarding data protection standards have ended in an Umbrella Agreement. Once in place, this agreement will ensure increased protection of personal data between international law enforcement agencies.

The Judicial Redress Act, introduced by Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner earlier this year, would be the final step in procuring much needed data and technological security between friendly nations. Congressman Sensenbrenner released the following statement, applauding the agreement and urging the passage of the Judicial Redress Act.

Congressman Sensenbrenner: “Technological advances have not only spurred progress in our world, but also new, sophisticated methods of criminal activity. To help combat this, I introduced the Judicial Redress Act to improve cooperation between United States law enforcement and our international allies. The recent agreement on data sharing between nations is a great step forward for international safety and prosperity. The Judicial Redress Act, however, remains a critical piece in our partnership with the European Union and is critical to ensure continued sharing of law enforcement intelligence.  I am optimistic that it will not only be brought before Congress, but will be passed with bipartisan support.”

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U.S. and Europe Forge Data-Protection Deal for Terrorism Cases


U.S. and European of­fi­cials fi­nal­ized a long-awaited data-pro­tec­tion deal that would provide a road map for how per­son­al in­form­a­tion is pro­tec­ted when shared across the At­lantic by law-en­force­ment au­thor­it­ies, of­fi­cials an­nounced Tues­day.

The so-called “um­brella agree­ment” is the cul­min­a­tion of four years of ne­go­ti­ations over how po­lice and judges should be able to share data dur­ing the course of crim­in­al or ter­ror­ism in­vest­ig­a­tions that cross bor­ders, and it marks a sig­ni­fic­ant step for­ward to re­build trust between the United States and its European al­lies after the Ed­ward Snowden spy­ing rev­el­a­tions that began more than two years ago.

For the deal to take ef­fect, however, Con­gress will first have to pass a meas­ure grant­ing European cit­izens the right to sue in U.S. courts if they be­lieve Amer­ic­an au­thor­it­ies have mis­used their per­son­al data. A bill to that ef­fect in­tro­duced in re­cent months has earned some bi­par­tis­an sup­port, but law­makers re­main grid­locked and dis­trac­ted head­ing in­to an elec­tion year.

“I am very pleased that today we have fi­nal­ised ne­go­ti­ations with the U.S. on high data-pro­tec­tion stand­ards for transat­lantic law-en­force­ment co­oper­a­tion,” Věra Jour­ová, the European Com­mis­sion’s justice com­mis­sion­er, said in a state­ment. “Ro­bust co­oper­a­tion between the EU and the U.S. to fight crime and ter­ror­ism is cru­cial to keep Europeans safe.”

But, Jour­ová ad­ded, “all ex­changes of per­son­al data, such as crim­in­al re­cords, names, or ad­dresses, need to be gov­erned by strong data-pro­tec­tion rules. This is what the um­brella agree­ment will en­sure.”

A sig­ni­fic­ant hang-up for the agree­ment has been the in­ab­il­ity for Europeans liv­ing in the United States to sue U.S. fed­er­al agen­cies if they be­lieve their data has been im­prop­erly used, shared, or dis­closed. Amer­ic­an cit­izens pos­sess that right already in the European Uni­on.

Earlier this year, Rep. Jim Sensen­bren­ner, a Wis­con­sin Re­pub­lic­an, in­tro­duced the Ju­di­cial Re­dress Act to ad­dress the data-pro­tec­tion im­bal­ance. His meas­ure would grant cit­izens of European al­lies the right to sue in the United States in re­gard to data pri­vacy vi­ol­a­tions. A pro­posed amend­ment to the long-stalled Cy­ber­se­cur­ity In­form­a­tion Shar­ing Act, put for­ward by Sen. Chris Murphy, a Con­necti­c­ut Demo­crat, mir­rors the Sensen­bren­ner ef­fort.

“The recent agreement on data shar­ing between na­tions is a great step for­ward for in­ter­na­tion­al safety and prosper­ity,” Sensen­bren­ner said in a Tues­day state­ment. “The Ju­di­cial Re­dress Act, however, re­mains a crit­ic­al piece in our part­ner­ship with the European Uni­on and is crit­ic­al to en­sure con­tin­ued shar­ing of law en­force­ment in­tel­li­gence.  I am op­tim­ist­ic that it will not only be brought be­fore Con­gress, but will be passed with bi­par­tis­an sup­port.”

Jour­ová also called on Con­gress to ad­opt the bill, “which would en­able us to fi­nally sign and con­clude the um­brella agree­ment,” she said.

Jour­ová also said that European of­fi­cials were work­ing in tan­dem with the United States to com­plete a more ro­bust safe-har­bor agree­ment, which deals with cor­por­ate data. Such agree­ments re­quire U.S. com­pan­ies to cer­ti­fy that they meet cer­tain levels of pri­vacy pro­tec­tions. If they clear European stand­ards, the com­pan­ies are al­lowed to store and pro­cess Europeans’ per­son­al data.

The um­brella agree­ment also in­cludes lim­its on data re­ten­tion, no­ti­fic­a­tion re­quire­ments in the event of data breaches, and a right to ac­cess one’s per­son­al data—and cor­rect it if in­ac­cur­ate—main­tained by law-en­force­ment au­thor­it­ies, ac­cord­ing to a fact sheet re­leased with the an­nounce­ment of the deal.

View this article online here.
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Delafield Town Hall Meeting at 7:00pm


Please join me the Delafield City Hall, located at 500 Genesee Street. If you have any questions or require special accomodations, please contact my Brookfield office at (262) 784-1111. Read More

Waukesha Town Hall Meeting at 1:00pm


Please join me on Saturday, April 18th at 1:00pm for a town hall meeting at the Waukesha Public Library, located at 321 Wisconsin Avenue. The meeting will be held in the Community Room, located on the lower level. Read More

Watertown Town Hall Meeting at 9:00am


Please join me on Saturday, April 18th at 9:00am at the Watertown Municipal Building, located at 106 Jones Street. The meeting will be held in the Council Chambers on the 2nd Floor. An elevator is available adjacent to the main lobby. Read More

Brookfield Town Hall Meeting at 9:00am


Please join me at the Brookfield Public Safety Building, located at 2100 N. Calhoun Road, for a town hall meeting on Saturday, March 28th at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held in the Court Room.

*This meeting was previously scheduled for March 21 at 9:00 a.m. Read More

Richfield Town Hall Meeting at 7:00pm


Please join me on Monday, February 23rd at 7:00pm at the Richfield Village Hall, located at 4128 Hubertus Road. The meeting will be held in the Council Chambers on the lower level. Read More

Slinger Town Hall Meeting at 7:00pm


Please join me on Monday, February 9th at 7:00pm at the Slinger Village Hall, located at 220 Slinger Road, for a town hall meeting. Read More

West Allis Town Hall Meeting at 1:00pm


Please join me at the West Allis Public Library, located at 7421 W. National Avenue, on Saturday, April 5th at 1:00pm. The meeting will be held in the Constitution Room, located off of the main lobby. Read More

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Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner Introduces the SAFE Justice Act

2015-07-09 18:34:58

Sensenbrenner Urges Passage of Freedom Act

2014-05-22 17:32:30

Sensenbrenner presses Holder on Clapper's perjury

2014-04-09 13:58:50

Sensenbrenner: EPA rulemaking picks pockets of consumers

2014-03-06 20:13:14

Sensenbrenner promotes Private Property Rights Protection Act

2014-02-25 22:33:08

Sensenbrenner Discusses NSA Reform with Neil Cavuto

2014-01-13 17:48:24

Sensenbrenner discusses NSA on America's Newsroom

2013-12-09 16:18:09

Sensenbrenner questions Gina McCarthy on E15

2013-11-14 22:49:57

Sensenbrenner discusses introduction of USA FREEDOM Act

2013-10-30 16:55:50

Sensenbrenner speaks at March on Washington Anniversary

2013-08-28 13:24:45

Sensenbrenner discusses Patriot Act abuses on Happening Now

2013-08-23 13:10:28

Sensenbrenner supports the Amash Amendment

2013-07-25 12:59:29

Sensenbrenner discusses abuses of the Patriot Act

2013-06-18 14:00:47

Sensenbrenner questions FBI Director Mueller on Patriot Act abuses

2013-06-13 15:43:15

Sensenbrenner: AG Holder must explain his testimony

2013-06-12 20:36:33

Sensenbrenner: Holder has lost the trust of the American people

2013-06-12 20:20:09

Sensenbrenner and Cavuto discuss Holder and the Media Surveillance Scandal

2013-06-04 21:22:32

Sensenbrenner Talks to Shannon Bream on America's News HQ

2013-06-03 14:17:24

Sensenbrenner Talks to Megyn Kelly about Holder's Misleading Testimony

2013-05-29 18:47:47

Sensenbrenner Questions Holder at a Hearing on Oversight of DOJ

2013-05-15 18:08:49

Contact Information

2449 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-5101
Fax 202-225-3190

F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr., (Jim), represents the Fifth Congressional District of Wisconsin. The Fifth District includes parts of Milwaukee, Dodge and Waukesha counties, and all of Washington and Jefferson counties.

Jim was born in Chicago and later moved to Wisconsin with his family. He graduated from the Milwaukee Country Day School and did his undergraduate studies at Stanford University, where he majored in political science. He then earned his law degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1968.

After serving ten years in the Wisconsin State Legislature, Jim ran for a U.S. House seat and was elected in November, 1978. He has been reelected since 1980.

Jim’s current committee assignments include serving on the Committee on Science and Technology and the Committee on the Judiciary. Congressman Sensenbrenner is Chairman of the Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security and Oversight Subcommittee. He is also a member of the Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and Internet, and the Subcommittees on Environment and Oversight.

He is the former Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, and as a long-serving committee member, Jim has established a strong record on crime, intellectual property and constitutional issues. Previously, Jim also served as Chairman of the House Committee on Science, where he solidified his reputation as an independent leader on science issues, as well as oversight.

Throughout his public life, Jim has been at the forefront of efforts to preserve the sanctity of life, eliminate wasteful government spending and protect the interests of American taxpayers. He has regularly been cited by the National Taxpayers Union as one of the most fiscally responsible House Members and is well known for completing his financial disclosure forms down to the penny.

Jim is proud of his many legislative achievements that have helped improve the lives of many during his tenure in Congress.

In 1977, Jim married Cheryl Warren of Green Bay, Wisconsin, a staunch advocate for the rights of the disabled. They have two adult children, Frank and Bob. In his free time, Jim enjoys watching the Packers and reading.

Serving With

Paul Ryan


Glenn Grothman


Sean Duffy


Reid Ribble


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