Science, Space, and Technology

Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

Lamar Smith

Smith Names December 18 Science Day in Congress

2017/12/16

WASHINGTON – House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) today named Monday, December 18, Science Day in Congress. On Science Day, the House will consider five bipartisan Science Committee bills that support careers and education in STEM, reauthorize federal firefighting programs and promote cooperative space and science programs between NASA and Israel. Chairman Smith: “On Monday, the House will take up five bipartisan Science Committee bills. The bills advance STEM education and careers in STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, math and computer science—update federal fire response programs and promote international space cooperation. With these five bills on the Floor, it’s fitting that we name Monday, December 18, Science Day in Congress. I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to join me in celebrating Science Day and recognizing the importance of research and discovery today and every day.” House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.): “America has led the world in science and innovation for generations. To think, 65 percent of today’s students will be employed in jobs that don’t exist yet. In our mission to prepare America’s next generation of innovation, the House will honor our nation’s history of leadership with Science Day. We will bring five bills to the floor that will support science, our nation’s infrastructure, aerospace and STEM careers. I applaud Chairman Smith on his hard work to get these bills ready for floor consideration.” Science Day bills to be considered on the House Floor: H.R. 4375, the STEM Research and Education Effectiveness and Transparency Act, is sponsored by Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-Va.), chairwoman of Research & Technology Subcommittee. The bill provides for a study and report on the effectiveness of National Science Foundation (NSF) research and education programs at broadening participation in STEM fields and requires more data on federal research grant application evaluations and outcomes. The bill text can be found here. H.R. 4323, the Supporting Veterans in STEM Careers Act, is sponsored by Rep. Neal Dunn (R-Fla.), a member of the Science Committee. The bill promotes veterans’ involvement in STEM education, computer science and scientific research. The bill text can be found here. H.R. 4254, the Women in Aerospace Education Act, is sponsored by Rep. Steve Knight (R-Calif.), vice chairman of Energy Subcommittee. The bill amends the NSF Authorization Act to strengthen the aerospace workforce pipeline for women through the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, NASA internship and fellowship opportunities, and by providing fellows and scholars research and intern experience at national labs and NASA centers. The bill text can be found here. H.R. 1159, the United States and Israel Space Cooperation Act, is sponsored by Rep. Derek Kilmer (D-Wash.). The bill directs NASA to continue to work with the Israel Space Agency in identifying and cooperatively pursuing peaceful space exploration and science initiatives in areas of mutual interest with appropriate proprietary safeguards. The bill text can be found here. H.R. 4661, the United States Fire Administration, AFG, and SAFER Program Reauthorization Act of 2017, is sponsored by Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-Va.), chairwoman of Research & Technology Subcommittee. The bill reauthorizes the United States Fire Administration, the Assistance to Firefighters Grants program, the Fire Prevention and Safety Grants program, and the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response grant program through fiscal year 2023 with grant program sunsets one year later. The bill text can be found here. Read More

H.R. 4661, the United States Fire Administration, AFG, and SAFER Program Reauthorization Act of 2017

2017/12/16

H.R. 4661, the United States Fire Administration, AFG, and SAFER Program Reauthorization Act of 2017, can be found here. Read More

H.R. 1159, the United States and Israel Space Cooperation Act

2017/12/16

H.R. 1159, the United States and Israel Space Cooperation Act, can be found here. Read More

Subcommittee on Energy Hearing - Advancing Solar Energy Technology: Research Trumps Deployment

2017/12/13

Hearing charter Opening Statements: Energy Subcommittee Chairman Randy Weber (R-Texas) Full Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) Witnesses: Mr. Daniel Simmons, principal deputy assistant secretary, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy [Truth in Testimony] Dr. Martin Keller, director, National Renewable Energy Laboratory [Truth in Testimony] Dr. Steve Eglash, executive director, Strategic Research Initiatives, Computer Science, Stanford University [Truth in Testimony] Mr. Kenny Stein, director of policy, Institute for Energy Research [Truth in Testimony] Read More

Subcommittee on Research and Technology Hearing - Head Health Challenge: Preventing Head Trauma from Football Field to Shop Floor to Battlefield

2017/12/13

Hearing charter Opening Statements:  Full Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) Research and Technology Subcommittee Chairwoman Barbara Comstock (R-Va.) Witnesses: Dr. Michael Fasolka, acting director, Material Measurement Lab, NIST [Truth in Testimony] Mr. Scott A. Kebschull, vice president and technical director, Dynamic Research, Inc. [Truth in Testimony] Dr. Alex O. Dehgan, chief executive officer and founder, Conservation X Labs [Truth in Testimony] Mr. Shawn Springs, chief executive officer, Windpact [Truth in Testimony] Read More

Smith, Babin Statements on President Trump's Space Policy Directive

2017/12/11

WASHINGTON - U.S. House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) and Space Subcommittee Chairman Brian Babin (R-Texas) today released the following statements after President Trump signed Space Policy Directive – 1 urging NASA to return Americans to the Moon and encourage human space exploration to Mars and beyond. Chairman Smith: “By signing this directive, President Trump has again shown that, under his administration, America will be a leader in space exploration. Going back to the Moon as the precursor to further exploration will enable NASA to test new systems and equipment critical for future missions, like the human exploration of Mars. Going back to the Moon achieves more than just the practical benefits; it will teach our children and grandchildren to dream big and strive to achieve what others think impossible. The innovations, inventions and ideas that they come up with, inspired by exploring the Moon and Mars, will fuel future aspirations to explore worlds beyond Mars. This administration’s dedication to space is a refreshing change from the past eight years.” Chairman Babin: “By signing this space policy directive and refocusing America’s space program on human spaceflight exploration, the President has ensured America’s leadership in space and prioritized our return to the Moon and future manned missions to Mars. Under the President’s leadership, we are now on the verge of a new generation of American greatness and leadership in space – leading us to once again launch American astronauts on American rockets from American soil.” Read More

SST Committee Warns IARC on Glyphosate Report

2017/12/08

WASHINGTON - U.S. House Science, Space, and Technology Committee leaders today warned the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) that the committee may reconsider U.S. taxpayer funding if the group does not demonstrate transparency regarding the its Monograph Programme in light of credible concerns with its report on glyphosate. Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas), Vice Chairman Frank Lucas (R-Okla.) and Environment Subcommittee Chairman Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.) reiterated to IARC Director Christopher Wild the committee’s earlier request to provide potential witnesses for a hearing before the committee. If IARC refuses to be transparent with the American people, the committee “will consider whether the values of scientific integrity and transparency are reflected in IARC Monographs” and if U.S. taxpayers should continue to fund the program. Smith and Biggs on November 1 sent a letter to Wild expressing concerns about “data deletion, manipulation and potential conflicts of interest” in IARC’s designation of glyphosate as probable carcinogen and requesting a list of potential witnesses for a hearing on the matter. On November 20, Wild responded to the committee’s letter and refused to provide witnesses. Today’s letter reads in part: Since 1985, IARC has received more than $48 million from NIH, $22 million of which has gone to the Monograph Programme (IMO). The U.S. Constitution grants Congress the power to oversee the spending of taxpayer dollars. As such, the Committee is required to carry out its Constitutional duty to ensure the stewardship of these funds. Given that the Committee has questions regarding the scientific integrity of the IMO, the Committee may decide to consider the appropriateness of providing continued U.S. federal government funding for the program. In light of these considerations, the Committee requests that IARC reconsider its position and provide a list of potential witnesses who are available to testify before the Committee. Given the serious nature of these concerns related to expenditures of taxpayer dollars, the Committee’s request for a witness to provide testimony regarding this matter should not be disregarded by IARC. As such, we reiterate the request in our November 1, 2017, letter. If IARC does not provide a full response to the request for potential witnesses, the Committee will consider whether the values of scientific integrity and transparency are reflected in IARC Monographs and if future expenditures of federal taxpayer dollars to this end need to continue. The letter can be found here. The House Science, Space, and Technology Committee has jurisdiction over environmental and scientific programs. Read More

Chairmen Smith, Lucas and Biggs follow-up letter to IARC

2017/12/08

The letter can be found here. Read More

Subcommittee on Space Hearing - NASA’s Next Four Large Telescopes

2017/12/06

Hearing charter Opening Statements: Space Subcommittee Chairman Brian Babin (R-Texas) Full Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) Witnesses: Dr. Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator, Science Mission Directorate, NASA [Truth in Testimony] Ms. Cristina Chaplain, director, Acquisition and Sourcing Management, Government Accountability Office [Truth in Testimony] Mr. A. Thomas Young, former director, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, and former president and chief operating officer, Martin Marietta Corporation [Truth in Testimony] Dr. Matt Mountain, president, Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy [Truth in Testimony] Dr. Chris McKee, professor emeritus of astronomy, Physics, University of California, Berkeley, on behalf of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine [Truth in Testimony] Read More

Subcommittee on Research and Technology Hearing - From Lab to Market: A Review of NSF Innovation Corps

2017/12/06

Hearing charter Opening Statement:  Research and Technology Subcommittee Chairwoman Barbara Comstock (R-Va.) Witnesses: Dr. Dawn Tilbury, assistant director, Directorate for Engineering, National Science Foundation [Truth in Testimony] Mr. Steve Blank, adjunct professor, Management Science and Engineering, Stanford University [Truth in Testimony] Dr. Dean Chang, associate vice president, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, University of Maryland; lead principal investigator, DC I-Corps Regional Node [Truth in Testimony] Dr. Sue Carter, professor, Department of Physics, and director, Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurial Development, University of California, Santa Cruz [Truth in Testimony] Read More

Contact Information

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Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-6371
Fax 202-226-0113
science.house.gov


Membership

Lamar Smith

TEXAS' 21st DISTRICT

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