Committee on Natural Resources

Doc Hastings

Committee Report Uncovers Lack of Independence & Accountability of Peer Review Process for ESA Listing Decisions

2014/12/15

House Natural Resources Committee majority staff released a report today that questions  the independence and accountability of  the peer review process in recent Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing decisions.  The report entitled, “Under the Microscope: An examination of the questionable science and lack of independent peer review in Endangered Species Act listing decisions” studies the federal government’s peer review process for 13 different ESA listing decisions made by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) since July 2013.  The report found numerous examples of potential bias and conflicts of interests with the peer reviewers and a lack of transparency and consistency in the peer review process. 

The decision of whether or not to list a species under the Endangered Species Act has significant implications for the economy and livelihoods of impacted communities and private landowners.  As such, these important decisions must be based on sound science that has undergone an independent peer review.  This report raises troubling concerns about the lack of independence of the peer review process and whether many current, upcoming or recently finalized listing decisions, such as the White Bluffs Bladderpod in my Central Washington district, are scientifically sound,” said House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (WA-04).   “With hundreds of ESA listings driven by this Administration’s closed-door settlements with litigious groups, discovery of any potential bias about how ESA data and science are reviewed casts serious doubt on the credibility of these decisions, and provides more evidence that the ESA needs continued oversight and updating.”

Specific findings of the report include:

  • The FWS does not have clear or consistent policies and procedures in place across all Regions to ensure that peer reviewers with potential conflicts of interest are identified and screened;
  • The FWS generally seeks peer review of its proposed listing decisions at the same time they are made available for public comment, rather than earlier in the process when the peer reviewers may have more meaningful input;
  • The FWS regularly recruits the same scientists on whose work a listing decision is based to serve as peer reviewers, including those who have known policy positions or affiliations with advocacy groups that support the listing decision, rather than truly independent scientists;
  • The FWS uses scientists as peer reviewers who have received grants or other financial assistance from the Department of the Interior and its bureaus and other agencies; and
  • The FWS routinely withholds from the public the identities of peer reviewers, qualifications of peer reviewers, and details about their comments.
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    Senate Approves Measure to Keep Cabin Fees Fair and Affordable

    2014/12/12

    The U.S. Senate today passed the National Defense Authorization Act of 2015, which included a provision authored by House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (WA-04) to establish a fair, predictable fee-setting system for families who own cabins in our National Forests.  The bill will now be sent to the President to be signed into law.

    "After years of hard work to fix this problem, I’m pleased that this bill is now on its way to being signed into law.   It puts a fair solution in place by creating a stable pricing structure and will help keep these family-owned cabins affordable for future generations to enjoy,” said Hastings.

    Cabin owners have recently been faced with arbitrary, skyrocketing fees as a result of a faulty appraisal system that has allowed annual cabin fees to increase exponentially.  Unable to afford the mounting fees, owners are faced with the choice of selling their cabins or abandoning and tearing them down.  Hastings’ Cabin Fee Act of 2014, which was the basis for this provision, establishes a simple, predictable fee-setting system under which cabin lots are assigned a place on a six tiered fee structure based on current appraisal.

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    Hastings Praises Senate Passage of Natural Resources Provisions in the NDAA

    2014/12/12

    House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (WA-04) today praised the Senate for its bipartisan approval of the Carl Levin & Howard P. “Buck” McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015, which included a bipartisan agreement (Title 30) on provisions under the jurisdiction of the House Natural Resources Committee and the Senate Energy & Natural Resources Committee.  The bill will now go to President Obama to be signed into law.

    I commend my colleagues in the Senate for working with us in a bipartisan fashion to advance a number of important public land measures that will promote job creation and economic growth,” said Chairman Hastings.  “Included in this agreement are nearly three dozen House-passed suspension bills that had languished in the Senate.  Our ability to come together and send these bills to the President’s desk represents a win for our country and for the communities throughout the West that will benefit from these measures.”

    Key Highlights:

  • Boosts new oil and natural gas production on federal lands by reducing permit delays, providing regulatory certainty to American job creators, preventing the Obama Administration from increasing costs, and extending a successful pilot program that helps the BLM deal with a backlog of drilling permit applications.
  • Allows for opening up the third largest undeveloped copper resource in the world – supporting nearly 3,700 American jobs and producing enough copper to meet 25 percent of current U.S. demand.
  • Reduces grazing permit backlogs and adds needed certainty to America’s ranching community.
  • Updates fee structure to provide predictable, fair rates so families are not forced to tear down cabins they own in national forests.  Supported by the National Forest Homeowners.
  • Provides for over 110,000 acres of land to be conveyed out of federal ownership to be utilized for economic development (including mineral production, timber production, infrastructure projects) and community development (ie, local cemetery, shooting range).
  • Releases 26,000 acres of current wilderness study areas, which unlocks lands to be used for multiple beneficial purposes, including economic development and recreation.
  • Designates approximately 245,000 acres of wilderness in specific areas with strong local and Congressional support.  Nearly half of those acres are already managed as if it were wilderness due to its current status as a roadless or wilderness study area.
  • Supports America’s National Parks by providing new means of enhancing private funding (through donor recognition and the issuance of a commemorative coin to recognize the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016).
  • Ensures that no private property can be condemned in land designations.
  • To learn more about the natural resources provisions passed as part of NDAA, click here.

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    Washington State Priorities Head to President’s Desk as Part of NDAA Agreement

    2014/12/12

    The Senate today approved the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015, which included several long-term priorities important to Washington state, and particularly Central Washington.  These provisions were included as part of bipartisan agreement between the House Natural Resources Committee and the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.  The House approved the bill last week and it will now go to President Obama to be signed into law.

    This bipartisan agreement is a victory for Washington state and the Central Washington district I’ve had the honor to represent.  It includes several long-term priorities for which the people of Central Washington have strongly advocated for years and their support and determination has helped get these bills over the finish line,” said Congressman Hastings.  “This achievement would not have been possible without the hard work of Senator Murray, Senator Cantwell, Representative Reichert, and Representatives Larsen and DelBene.”

    Provisions impacting Washington state include:

  • Manhattan Project National Historical Park. This provision establishes the Manhattan Project National Historical Park that will include Hanford’s historic B Reactor as well as facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Los Alamos, New Mexico.  Under the bill, the Department of the Interior has one year to establish the Manhattan Project National Historical Park and enter into an agreement with the Department of Energy governing the respective roles in administering the facilities, enhancing public access, management, interpretation and historic preservation.
  • Cabin Fee Fairness: This provision modifies the current cabin fee formula to make it more predictable and fair for families who own cabins in our National Forests. In recent years, cabin owners have been faced with arbitrary, skyrocketing fees as a result of a faulty appraisal system that has allowed annual cabin fees to increase exponentially. Unable to afford the mounting fees, owners are faced with the choice of selling their cabins or abandoning and tearing them down.Hastings’ Cabin Fee Act, which was the basis for this provision, creates a new formula for calculating fees to ensure the bill is revenue neutral without imposing fees that American families cannot afford.
  • Public Access to Rattlesnake Mountain: This provision, which mirrors legislation passed by the House of Representatives in previous years, will ensure public access to Rattlesnake Mountain in the Hanford Reach National Monument.
  • Hanford Land TransferThis provision executes a land transfer with a deadline of September 2015.  The 1,641 acres of Hanford land no longer needed for cleanup activities will be conveyed to the local Community Reuse Organization (CRO) for economic development and diversification. The land is already designated for industrial use under the Department of Energy’s Hanford Comprehensive Land Use Plan. The CRO requested the land transfer from the Department of Energy over three years ago.
  • Stehekin Road.  This provision will allow the National Park Service to relocate and rebuild the Upper Stehekin Valley Road in the North Cascades National Park. Over time, floods and the changing path of the Stehekin River has critically damaged significant sections of Stehekin Road.
  • Alpine Lakes. This provision will expand the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area in Washington state and designate both the Pratt and Middle Fork Snoqualmie Rivers as Wild and Scenic.
  • Illabot Creek. This provision designates a segment of Illabot Creek in Skagit County as a component of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System.
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    Chairman Hastings: The Senate Must Act on House-Passed California Emergency Drought Relief Legislation

    2014/12/09

    House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (WA-04) released the following statement today after the House of Representatives passed H.R. 5781, the California Emergency Drought Relief Act of 2014, by a bipartisan vote of 230 to 182. This bill, sponsored by Reps. David G. Valadao (CA-21), Kevin McCarthy (CA-23), Ken Calvert (CA-42), Doug LaMalfa (CA-01), Tom McClintock (CA-04), and Devin Nunes (CA-22), would provide short-term, emergency relief to the drought that’s hurting California’s communities and causing negative economic impacts nationwide.

    “Today’s approval of the California Emergency Drought Relief Act of 2014 marks the second time this Congress that the House has taken bipartisan steps to provide relief to communities and families impacted by this devastating drought.  The effects of this drought – from soaring unemployment to higher food prices - are being felt not only in California but across the Nation.  I commend my colleagues from California on their ongoing work and dedication to this issue and urge the Senate to take immediate action on this legislation to address the dire situation.”

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    ICYMI: Fresno Bee: Facts Support Passage of Drought Relief Legislation

    2014/12/08

    EDITORIAL: Facts Support Passage of Drought Relief Legislation
    The Bee Editorial Board
    The Fresno Bee
    December 6, 2014

    One of the oldest rules in politics is, when the facts are on your side, you cite the facts; when the facts aren’t on your side, you pound the table.

    Over the last few days, opponents of The California Emergency Drought Relief Act, which was introduced in the House of Representatives on Tuesday, have been yelling about water grabs, protesting the timing of the bill’s introduction and doing all they can to divert attention from the facts — both pertaining to this legislation and to the cruel realities of our state’s prolonged drought.

    So, let’s start with the facts.

    This drought is the worst that California has experienced in at least 1,200 years. So says a study published by the American Geophysical Union and cited by a Washington Post blog Thursday. Not only have we received little rain, but the lack of precipitation has been intensified by record-breaking high temperatures. Moreover, the fertile agricultural fields of the San Joaquin Valley are suffering through an “exceptional drought,” the most severe classification.

    Yes, it has rained lately in California. Thank goodness it has. But much more rain is needed to restore our aquifers, fill our reservoirs and reverse the economic hardship inflicted on our state and, in particular, the Valley, by the drought.

    The bill (HR 5781) introduced by Rep. David Valadao, R-Hanford and supported by GOP leadership provides the flexibility and resources to give farmers in the Valley and elsewhere a fighting chance to grow their crops and put people back to work in 2015. In a nutshell, the bill would allow the Bureau of Reclamation the freedom to hold more winter rain and snow and then distribute it to areas in need. Not only would this flexibility help farmers and rural communities, but it would benefit the environment as well.

    This legislation is the product of months of talks and negotiations earlier this year involving Republican and Democrats in both the House and the U.S. Senate and is the result of thoughtful compromise. The bill doesn’t amend the Endangered Species Act or existing biological opinions. It leaves decision-making about habitat, protected species and water quality to federal environmental agencies. But it would reduce the flow of water through the Sacramento-Joaquin River Delta to the Pacific Ocean and pump more water to the south — as long as that pumping doesn’t harm protected fish such as delta smelt, salmon and steelhead.

    Moreover, these changes would be temporary, as they would end in September of 2016 or upon the governor ending California’s drought declaration.

    Opponents are trying to paint this bill as detrimental to the environment and the result of secret negotiations. Again, let’s examine the facts. In a phone interview with The Editorial Board on Friday, Rep. Jim Costa, D-Fresno, pointed out that this proposal is similar to Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s bill that was passed under unanimous consent by the Senate in February.

    Passage of Feinstein’s Emergency Drought Relief Act then set the stage for negotiations — and compromise — with Valadao, who earlier had received partisan House approval of a bill that was extreme and over the top. Early on, Northern California Democrats, many of which are supported by environmentalists, were involved in the negotiations. But they drew firm lines in the sand and quit the talks.

    Valadao’s bill is reasonable and much needed. It deserves the support of Sen. Feinstein and Sen. Barbara Boxer and the California delegation in the House of Representatives.

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    Chairman Hastings: The People of the San Joaquin Valley Cannot Wait Any Longer for Congress to Act on the Ongoing Water Crisis

    2014/12/08

    House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (WA-04) delivered the following statement on the House floor today in support of H.R. 5781, the California Emergency Drought Relief Act of 2014.


    “Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of H.R. 5781, the California Emergency Drought Relief Act of 2014, introduced by our colleague, Mr. Valadao.

    Today, the House meets to once again provide a solution to the ongoing water crisis in California.   The House has been on record twice to provide solutions and we must act again. 

    Although this bill is different from the two prior attempts and reflects significant bipartisan progress towards enacting a solution, we must provide relief – even if it’s short-term relief -- before this Congress adjourns.  It is unacceptable to for us to give up when Californians are starving and their communities are literally drying up.

    Like California, my Central Washington district is heavily dependent on irrigated water to support our local economy and agricultural industry.  I understand the importance of having a stable, reliable water supply.  And I also understand the economic devastation that is caused when that water supply is shut off, particularly when that shut-off is avoidable.

    California is in an emergency situation.  For years, San Joaquin Valley farmers have been fighting against federal regulations and environmental lawsuits that have diverted water supplies in order to help a three-inch fish.  In 2009, there was a deliberate diversion of over 300 billion gallons of water away from farmers.  As a result, thousands of farm workers lost their jobs, unemployment reached 40 percent in some communities, and thousands of acres of fertile farmland dried up.   The same thing is happening today.

    As Chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, I’ve traveled to Fresno, California and seen the effects of natural and man-made drought firsthand.  We’ve held multiple hearings and heard the pleas of communities that simply want the water turned back on and their livelihoods restored.  We’ve seen farmers, who normally help feed the Nation, being sent to wait in line at food banks and, in some cases, being served carrots imported from China.

    I want to stress that this crisis does not just impact California, but has rippling effects across the entire Nation.  California’s San Joaquin Valley is a salad bowl for the world and provides a significant share of the fruits and vegetables for our country.  Food grows where water flows.  When there is no water, our food supply suffers, resulting in higher food prices across the country, higher unemployment, and increased reliance on foreign food sources.

    Unlike the last time this body acted on this issue, the Senate passed its version of a bill in June of this year.    I commend Senator Feinstein for her efforts to pass that short-term bill.   Since the bills were so different in their scope, those interested in productive conversations to bridge the differences have negotiated in good faith over the last six months. 

    We got very close to resolution but more time is necessary on agreeing to a long-term bill.  In the interim, the measure before us today reflects much of what the Senate passed earlier this year and agreed to in our negotiations to bring some short-term water supply relief to many of those communities in need.

    This bill simply allows us to capture some water from storms in this and the next water year and improves data quality when it comes to the existing biological opinions on smelt and salmon.  It also protects those communities in the north who are from the relatively-abundant water areas.  

    The entire bill sunsets in September of 2016 to allow more time to negotiate a longer-term solution that not only could help California but other western states as well.

    This bill is not perfect, but it’s a short-term bridge based on productive negotiations between those who want sensible solutions.  This bill, while very limited in scope, helps protect the jobs and economic livelihoods of farm families and workers and communities in dire need of water.   

    The people of the San Joaquin Valley cannot wait any longer for Congress to act.  As the title of this bill suggests, it is truly an emergency for many and time is running out.  Those communities facing massive unemployment deserve nothing less.

    I commend my colleagues from California for their hard work in getting this bill to the floor today.

    I urge my colleagues to support this bill and reserve the balance of my time.”

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    ICYMI: E&E News: House passes NDAA with major parks, development package

    2014/12/05

    House passes NDAA with major parks, development package
    Phil Taylor
    E&E News
    December 4, 2014

    The House today voted 300-119 to pass the fiscal 2015 defense authorization bill, including what would be the biggest package of public lands, wilderness, parks and energy bills in nearly six years.

    The defense bill would designate nearly 250,000 acres of wilderness in five Western states, protect roughly 70 miles of rivers and establish or expand more than a dozen national parks. It would also expedite oil and gas and grazing permits on public lands and convey more than 100,000 acres of public lands for economic development including mineral production, logging, infrastructure and community developments.

    "This agreement represents a balanced approach to public lands management," said House Natural Resources Chairman Doc Hastings (R-Wash.) on the chamber floor this morning. "It'll create thousands of new jobs and support energy and mineral production, transfer land out of federal ownership, and protect treasured lands through the establishment of several locally supported parks and wilderness areas."

    Conservation groups cheered the bill's advance, even as other green groups remained deeply troubled over certain logging, mining and grazing provisions they said negate the bill's positives.

    A handful of conservation groups today warned the bill would guarantee an Endangered Species Act listing for the greater sage grouse (see related story).

    Voting "nay" were 32 Republicans and 87 Democrats. They included Reps. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) and Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.), top Democrats on Natural Resources, though neither articulated to what extent the public lands package influenced his vote.

    Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.) voted in favor despite having grave concerns with one provision in the lands package to convey Arizona public lands to a copper mining company, which he argued could offend American Indian tribes.

    "We're in a difficult moment near the end of a session and have must-pass legislation," Cole said on the floor, noting that he thought the bulk of NDAA is good and bipartisan. "Like anything in a half-a-trillion-dollar bill, I can quibble with this or that. But the reality is, I favor the legislation."

    The bill's passage drew applause from Trout Unlimited and the Pew Charitable Trusts.

    "Passage of these conservation bills is a hopeful sign that Congress can work across party lines and find common ground," said Mike Matz, Pew's director of U.S. public lands. "Members have clearly heard from their constituents that they expect lawmakers to join together to get things done for the country. The largely bipartisan wilderness legislation was crafted with the help and support of local communities, and it reflects democracy at its best."

    The American Petroleum Institute also lauded the House vote, citing a bipartisan provision in the bill to extend and expand a Bureau of Land Management oil and gas permit streamlining program.

    "A more efficient permitting process is crucial to America's all-of-the-above energy strategy," said API's Director of Upstream and Industry Operations Erik Milito. "This legislation will help to address well-documented regulatory delays that have held up energy production on federal lands and slowed the growth of jobs."

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    ICYMI: The Hill: Federal land exchanges in the National Defense Authorization Act

    2014/12/04


    Federal land exchanges in the National Defense Authorization Act
    Daniel McGroarty, President of American Resources Policy Network
    The Hill, Congress Blog
    December 4, 2014

    In the December dash to act on must-pass legislation in the waning days of the 113th Congress, there are real risks that ill-advised initiatives will make their way into law.  

    Then again, the pressure on both branches of Congress to actually act can sometimes produce that rarest of results – demonstrating that sound policy is still possible in Washington.  Case in point: the carefully crafted federal land exchange package that is among the proposed amendments to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), the must-pass bill that sets in place Pentagon policies and defense funding for the year ahead. 

    Analyzing breaking legislation is a tricky business, and some have characterized the land exchange package as a federal land grab, appropriating even more acres into the already-massive federal wilderness inventory. And if that’s all there was to the package, there would be little reason to support it, and even less reason to see it tucked into a major defense bill.  

    But that’s not the full story. The new lands added to the federal wilderness register are part of a balanced agreement – a land swap that frees up current federal lands for resource development, providing new and needed domestic sources of oil, natural gas, coal, timber and key metals like copper.  This balancing act – resource-rich federal land made available for development, offset by new tracts being added to the federal wilderness rolls – is in the spirit of the multiple-use standard at the core of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, which enshrined in law the concept that federal land should be managed to “best meet the present and future needs of the American people.”  That means that various public goods – conservation, environmental stewardship, economic development and resource security – should be factors in formulating federal land policy. 

    The proposed NDAA land package is an opportunity to break the logjam that has characterized much of the 113th Congress, and to do so in a way that balances conservationist principles and the policy imperative to encourage the development of key materials critical to a revival of America’s manufacturing might. 

    The concept of balance is honored in another way as well:  The revenues raised form the federal lands freed for resource development will help pay for the costs of conservationist stewardship.  That’s an important principle, at a time when the U.S. Department of Interior has accumulated an estimated $20 billion worth of deferred maintenance on federal lands. 

    Including such a package in the NDAA is well within the purview of the Senate and House Armed Services Committees, as a land exchange section has been a fixture in the annual NDAA for at least 25 years, spanning both Republican and Democratic presidencies. 

    Take the case of copper, where the U.S. production leaves a shortfall currently met by imports totaling 600,000 metric tons a year.  The proposed exchange can facilitate a new source of domestic supply sufficient to nearly close the copper gap. That’s a legitimate national security objective, as the lack of copper and two of its by-product metals – molybdenum and tellurium – have, as the National Defense Stockpile Requirements Report notes, already caused significant defense weapons system delays. 

    Nor is this the kind of special interest legislative sausage-making stuffed into a must-pass bill that Congressional critics rightly condemn.  Sens. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), John McCain (R-Ariz.), Jon Tester (D-Mont.) and their Senate colleagues on both sides of the aisle have been crafting this compromise for the better part of two years. This isn’t a last-minute ornament being hung on the Congressional Christmas Tree; the NDAA is the culmination of this process.  

    The result is something the 113th Congress hasn’t seen much of:  a balanced legislative package, backed with bipartisan support, that will generate jobs and GDP while advancing critical national security interests.  Not bad for a lame-duck day’s work. 

    McGroarty is president of American Resources Policy Network, a non-partisan education and public policy research organization headquartered in Washington, D.C.

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    House Approves Natural Resources Provisions As Part of NDAA

    2014/12/04

    House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (WA-04) today praised the passage of the Carl Levin & Howard P. “Buck” McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015, which included a bipartisan agreement (Title 30) on provisions under the jurisdiction of the House Natural Resources Committee and the Senate Energy & Natural Resources Committee.  

    "This agreement represents a balanced approach to public lands management.  It will create thousands of new jobs, support energy and mineral production, transfer land out of federal ownership, and protect treasured lands through the establishment of several locally-supported parks and wilderness areas,” said Chairman Hastings. “All of the bills included in this agreement have undergone public review in the House or Senate, and it includes nearly three dozen House-passed suspension bills that have languished in the Senate. This agreement is good for jobs and the economy.”

    Key Highlights:

    • Boosts new oil and natural gas production on federal lands by reducing permit delays, providing regulatory certainty to American job creators, preventing the Obama Administration from increasing costs, and extending a successful pilot program that helps the BLM deal with a backlog of drilling permit applications.
    • Allows for opening up the third largest undeveloped copper resource in the world – supporting nearly 3,700 American jobs and producing enough copper to meet 25 percent of current U.S. demand.
    • Reduces grazing permit backlogs and adds needed certainty to America’s ranching community.
    • Updates fee structure to provide predictable, fair rates so families are not forced to tear down cabins they own in national forests. Supported by the National Forest Homeowners.
    • Provides for over 110,000 acres of land to be conveyed out of federal ownership to be utilized for economic development (including mineral production, timber production, infrastructure projects) and community development (ie, local cemetery, shooting range).
    • Releases 26,000 acres of current wilderness study areas, which unlocks lands to be used for multiple beneficial purposes, including economic development and recreation.
    • Designates approximately 245,000 acres of wilderness in specific areas with strong local and Congressional support. Nearly half of those acres are already managed as if it were wilderness due to its current status as a roadless or wilderness study area.
    • Supports America’s National Parks by providing new means of enhancing private funding (through donor recognition and the issuance of a commemorative coin to recognize the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016).
    • Ensures that no private property can be condemned in land designations.
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    Contact Information

    1324 Longworth HOB
    Washington, DC 20515
    Phone 202-225-2761
    Fax 202-225-5929
    naturalresources.house.gov


    Membership

    Dan Benishek

    MICHIGAN's 1st DISTRICT

    Rob Bishop

    UTAH's 1st DISTRICT

    Paul Broun

    GEORGIA's 10th DISTRICT

    Bradley Byrne

    ALABAMA's 1st DISTRICT

    Kevin Cramer

    NORTH DAKOTA

    Steve Daines

    MONTANA

    Jeff Duncan

    SOUTH CAROLINA's 3rd DISTRICT

    John Fleming

    LOUISIANA's 4th DISTRICT

    Bill Flores

    TEXAS' 17th DISTRICT

    Louie Gohmert

    TEXAS' 1st DISTRICT

    Paul Gosar

    ARIZONA's 4th DISTRICT

    Doc Hastings

    WASHINGTON's 4th DISTRICT

    Raul Labrador

    IDAHO's 1st DISTRICT

    Doug LaMalfa

    CALIFORNIA's 1st DISTRICT

    Doug Lamborn

    COLORADO's 5th DISTRICT

    Cynthia Lummis

    WYOMING

    Vance McAllister

    LOUISIANA's 5th DISTRICT

    Tom McClintock

    CALIFORNIA's 4th DISTRICT

    Markwayne Mullin

    OKLAHOMA's 2nd DISTRICT

    Jon Runyan

    NEW JERSEY's 3rd DISTRICT

    Jason Smith

    MISSOURI's 8th DISTRICT

    Steve Southerland

    FLORIDA's 2nd DISTRICT

    Glenn Thompson

    PENNSYLVANIA's 5th DISTRICT

    Scott Tipton

    COLORADO's 3rd DISTRICT

    Rob Wittman

    VIRGINIA's 1st DISTRICT

    Donald Young

    ALASKA