Committee on Financial Services

Jeb Hensarling

FSC Majority | Week in Review

2015/01/30

Washington ‘Rolling the Dice’ Again on Risky Housing Schemes

At a hearing on Tuesday, members of the committee voiced their strong concerns to the Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency regarding recent FHFA actions that could repeat the same mistakes that led to the financial crisis.

"Contrary to the fable told by the left, the root cause of the financial crisis was not deregulation but dumb regulation. Regulations and statutes that either incented or mandated financial institutions to loan money to people to buy homes they ultimately could not afford to keep. Exhibit one, Fannie and Freddie’s affordable housing goals. 70 percent of all troubled mortgages were backstopped by Fannie, Freddie and other federal agencies," said Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX).

"Regrettably, Washington appears to be rolling the dice yet again. Within the last 12 months FHFA has announced three different policies that are harmful to transitioning us to a sustainable housing finance system that protects both homeowners and taxpayers," added Chairman Hensarling.

Housing and Insurance Subcommittee Chairman Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO) noted, "At today’s hearing, FHFA Director Mel Watt agreed that there are certain tenants of responsible lending; Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not adhere to those tenants, and that could ultimately leave taxpayers in the position of once again footing a massive bailout. Director Watt confirmed today that taxpayers are backing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and will continue to be on the hook until housing finance reform is enacted. It is unfathomable that Director Watt thinks it is acceptable to take no action to protect taxpayers, particularly given that our nation is just a few years removed from a financial crisis that saw record numbers of foreclosures and the largest taxpayer funded bailout in history."

Rep. Mia Love (R-UT) said, "As I witnessed as a mayor, I have actually seen how these heavily involved government policies have actually hurt many cities in their ability to thrive and to grow. We have watched homes being built and actually seen those homes a year later completely empty, and hardworking families lose their credit and their ability to get into a home.”

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer | Luetkemeyer leads effort to end Operation Choke Point

“We’re very pleased they’ve acknowledged their wrongdoing and they’ve accepted our suggestions to put in place measures to stop this activity,” Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer, R-Mo., told The Daily Signal in a phone call this morning. Luetkemeyer, a member of the House Financial Services Committee and leader in the fight to end Operation Choke Point, met with FDIC Chairman Martin Gruenbery and Vice Chairman Thomas Hoenig earlier today as a follow-up to concerns voiced last November.

Weekend Must Reads


Investor's Business Daily | Free Spending In Washington In A Time Of Frugality

Given half-trillion-dollar deficits, this is supposed to be an era of belt-tightening for governmental agencies. But you wouldn't know it from the fat-and-happy spending by some of them. Fannie Mae and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, for example, have both announced they're moving on up into glitzy new downtown Washington, D.C., office buildings costing taxpayers hundreds of millions.

McClatchy | Federal debt will explode over next 10 years, CBO says

The improving deficit numbers are temporary. Budget deficits are projected to begin going up again in 2018, and to nearly double by 2024 as retiring baby boomers strain the health and retirement systems, the economy grows more slowly and interest on the nation’s outstanding debt rises.

Real Clear Policy | The Crushing Burden of Government Regulation

Three years ago, Democrats and Republicans joined together to enact the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act to reform U.S. securities law and make it easier for small businesses to raise capital. That law was a good start, but more needs to be done. So, Rep. Patrick McHenry (R., N.C.) is building support for a JOBS Act II, whose passage should be a no brainer for legislators of both parties.

    On the Horizon 

February 4, 2015 10:00 a.m.
Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee Hearing

"Exploring Alleged Ethical and Legal Violations at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development"

  In the News

Wall Street Journal | Hensarling’s Housing History Lesson

Bloomberg | Bipartisan Support for Dodd-Frank Changes: Neugebauer

Wall Street Journal | Fannie, Freddie Regulator Defends Actions

Wall Street Journal | FDIC: Examiners Must Give Banks Written Notice on Risky Accounts

American Banker | FSOC's Proposed SIFI Reforms Are 'Too Little, Too Late': Critics

Washington Post | Mr. Obama’s economic optimism ignores the ongoing battle with federal debt

Reuters | U.S. housing regulator signals guarantee fee decision this quarter

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Hearing entitled “Exploring Alleged Ethical and Legal Violations at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development”

2015/01/28


Hensarling: Washington is Repeating Same Mistakes That Caused Financial Crisis

2015/01/27


 
CLICK HERE TO WATCH

Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) delivered the following opening statement at today’s full committee hearing with Federal Housing Finance Agency Director Mel Watt:
 
As Yogi Berra once famously said, “It's déjà vu all over again.” Memories are clearly short among Washington’s ruling class because they are repeating the same mistakes that caused the 2008 financial crisis in the first place.
 
Contrary to the fable told by the left, the root cause of the financial crisis was not deregulation but dumb regulation. Regulations and statutes that either incented or mandated financial institutions to loan money to people to buy homes they ultimately could not afford to keep. Exhibit one, Fannie and Freddie’s affordable housing goals. 70 percent of all troubled mortgages were backstopped by Fannie, Freddie and other federal agencies.
 
And contrary to the fable of the left, it ultimately wasn’t Wall Street greed that brought down the system. Of course, there is greed on Wall Street.  When hasn’t there been? But there is also something known as Washington greed; greed for power to command and control huge swaths of our economy. Greed to have Washington allocate credit within our society as opposed to “we the people” in a free and competitive, transparent and innovative market. The mentality of this Washington greed is best summed up by Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber, who famously stated, “The American people are too stupid to know the difference.”
 
I doubt the American people collectively would have been foolish enough to “roll the dice” on taxpayer backed subprime lending. Clearly Washington was. The dice were rolled, millions lost their homes, the economy was brought to its knees and hardworking taxpayers had to pay for the mother of all bailouts.
 
Regrettably, Washington appears to be rolling the dice yet again. Within the last 12 months FHFA has announced three different policies that are harmful to transitioning us to a sustainable housing finance system that protects both homeowners and taxpayers.
 
First, by suspending a previously scheduled increase to fees Fannie and Freddie charge for their loan guarantees, FHFA is leveraging the taxpayer balance sheet -- one that is clearly awash in red ink -- to lock in a near government monopoly.
 
Next, in a race to the bottom with FHA to become the nation’s largest subprime lender, FHFA has announced that it will begin to allow the GSEs to buy mortgages with as little as 3 percent down. As history repeats itself, historically prudent underwriting standards are yet again being thrown out the window. The data is overwhelming that there is a direct correlation between delinquencies and foreclosures on the one hand and low down payments on the other.
 
Finally and most recently, FHFA has announced it will begin siphoning off taxpayer funds from Fannie and Freddie in order to begin filling government housing slush funds. All the while Fannie and Freddie remain ridiculously leveraged and continue to threaten hard working American taxpayers.
 
The best affordable housing program is a healthy economy, not a doubling down on failed Obamanomics, and certainly not more risky housing schemes from Washington. It’s time to grow our economy from Main Street up – not from Washington down. It’s time to get off the boom-bust-bailout cycle. It's time hardworking middle income families have greater economic opportunity to achieve financial independence and the opportunity to buy a home they can actually afford to keep. Read More

FSC Majority | Weekly Video Message: Members Discuss SOTU

2015/01/26

 
CLICK HERE TO WATCH

In this week's FSC Video Message, members give their thoughts on the president’s State of the Union speech. 
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ICYMI: Watch Chairman Hensarling’s Interview on C-SPAN

2015/01/26

House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) appeared on C-SPAN’s Newsmakers this past Sunday to discuss his thoughts on the President’s State of the Union speech, fundamental tax reform, the economy, and the need for Congress to pass sustainable housing finance reform.

You can watch the entire interview by clicking below. Excerpts that may be of interest:

Tax Reform: “I hardly believe that a tax increase qualifies as tax reform. Tax reform is about making the tax code fairer, flatter, simpler, more competitive.”

President Obama’s Tax Increase Plan: “This is a lot more about politics than it is economics. It’s a lot more about the politics of division and envy than it is the economics of growth and opportunity and financial security.”

Washington’s Regulatory Burden: “We need a regulatory burden that doesn’t hurt our small businesses. We need to make sure that middle income families have rising paychecks. We need to make sure they have great career opportunities. We need to make sure that they have competitive, transparent, innovative credit markets vigorously policed for force, fraud, and deception. But regrettably Dodd-Frank has institutionalized Too Big to Fail. The regulatory burden has made the big banks get bigger, the small banks get fewer, and the taxpayer poorer, so there’s a lot of work to be done.”


CLICK HERE TO WATCH

 
 
 
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FSC Majority | Week in Review

2015/01/23

Committee Adopts Oversight Plan

On Wednesday the Committee voted unanimously to adopt the Committee's oversight plan for the 114th Congress.

"No one in Washington – Republican or Democrat – should ever be allowed to carelessly spend the hard-eared taxpayers’ money. And that is why this committee will continually and vigilantly monitor every agency and every program under our jurisdiction. Hopefully we feel this is a bipartisan mission and a bipartisan commitment," said Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX).

"If a program isn’t working, if it does more harm than good, it is time to reform it or it is time to get rid of it. If policies or regulations don’t make common sense, let’s make them sensible. That will lead to a better economy," added Chairman Hensarling. "As all of us know, consumers remain very concerned about the economy. Still too many live paycheck to paycheck. Too many have seen their paychecks shrink. Americans deserve an economy that meets its full potential. That is something I hope members on both sides of the aisle will be committed to -- that we will have a healthier, more robust economy."


MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

Rep. Patrick McHenry | McHenry: "Get Lending Moving Again"

“The number one priority is to ensure that we get lending moving again,” McHenry said, during a phone interview. “Small community banks and credit unions have been harmed by the regulatory agenda in Washington that makes it more costly to get credit and less available in a time where families and small businesses need access to capital. In addition to that, it’s important that we ensure that the government is no longer on the hook for bailouts of banks, or any other institution, for that matter, in the United States. We’re working through changes to Dodd-Frank to ensure that the government is not on the hook for bailouts going forward.”

Weekend Must Reads


Washington Post | The Federal Housing Administration’s risky move to lower premiums

Taxpayers might legitimately wonder, however, why it’s necessary to take on this additional risk so soon after the FHA’s bailout, before the capital cushion is even halfway rebuilt — and at a time when homebuyers are already enjoying record-low interest rates, plus a windfall from cheaper gasoline. The president’s own estimate of the cash savings from the premium cut implies that it would pump less than $1 billion a year of consumer cash into an economy that is already recovering well without it. The premium reduction takes effect Jan. 26, so the administration can still reconsider, which is what it will do if it has really learned a key lesson of the Great Recession: Finance in general, and mortgage finance in particular, is riskier than it sometimes seems, and the best protection against those risks is a solid core of capital. 

CNBC
| Kiss that 'shrinking' budget deficit goodbye

"However, mandatory federal spending, especially for public retirement and health-care benefits, continued to expand unabated in the first three months of the fiscal year. Such rising mandatory expenditures foreshadow spiraling federal deficits and debt ahead."

Investor's Business Daily | Next Housing Bubble Will Be Caused By Gov't, Not 'Greed'

Fannie and Freddie are now purchasing the large majority of mortgages and announced last month that they would buy mortgages with only 3% down payments. The qualified mortgage standards that HUD and other regulators laid down in October allowed for mortgages with zero down payments. That sounds like a recipe for another housing bubble — and for mass foreclosures, which hurt the policies' intended beneficiaries — and perhaps for another financial crisis as well.

CNN Money | Obama says wages are growing. They're not

Wages basically didn't grow at all in 2014, according to the Labor Department. The median weekly wage at the end of 2014 was $796 (seasonally adjusted). That's barely changed from the same time in 2013, when the weekly wage was $794.

    On the Horizon 

January 27, 2015 10:00 a.m.
Full Committee Hearing

"Sustainable Housing Finance: An Update from the Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency
 

  In the News

Wall Street Journal | Obama’s Middle-Class Blind Spot

Daily Signal | Government Agency Under Scrutiny for $215 Million Building Renovation

Washington Times | The unvarnished state of the union

The Star Press | Messer: Washington does not need more money

The Intelligencer | Correcting the Dodd-Frank abomination

MPBN News | Poliquin Touts Importance of Committee Assignment

Wall Street Journal | The Gaslight Presidency

Forbes | Monetary Politics: The Biggest Money Player In Politics Is The Fed

Investor's Business Daily | President Obama's Tax Hike Plan Is A Plan For Failure

Wall Street Journal | Tax Reform Should Go Right Down Main Street

Investor's Business Daily | The Real Obama Economy: A Subpar Recovery Drags On

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Hensarling to Appear on CSPAN’s Newsmakers

2015/01/23

House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) will appear on CSPAN’s Newsmakers this Sunday, January 25th at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. ET.  The Chairman will offer his thoughts on the President’s State of the Union speech, fundamental tax reform, the economy, and the need for Congress to pass sustainable housing finance reform.

 
 
 

 

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Hensarling: Republicans Know You Have To Grow the Economy from Main Street Up, Not Washington Down

2015/01/21

Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) appeared on Fox Business Network’s “Varney and Company” today to discuss last night’s State of the Union Address. Some excerpts:
 
CLICK HERE TO WATCH

Chairman Hensarling on President Obama’s proposed taxes:

“The president claims he doesn’t believe in trickle-down economics.  Well, there is something called trickle-down taxation. So as he adds more taxes to banks, insurance companies, and investment managers, those taxes are going to trickle down to moms and pops who are trying to borrow money for a mortgage, for an auto loan, or small business loan. So that is the first point I would make.

“The second point I would make is the president claims this is all about ‘mitigation of risk;’ that he has to ensure that these particular financial institutions aren’t engaged in in unacceptable risk -- like he would know. My question is, what was Dodd-Frank all about? So is this a tacit admission that Dodd-Frank has failed?”

Chairman Hensarling on what’s needed instead:

“Most Americans don’t want to occupy Wall Street, they just want to quit bailing it out.  And so the answer there is to end the Dodd-Frank taxpayer-funded bailouts system, to end this designation of ‘Too Big to Fail’ institutions, and improve our bankruptcy code to make sure these institutions can be resolved in bankruptcy.”

“But our big problem now is a regulatory burden that is crushing our community financial institutions and thus crushing their clients who are small businesses and entrepreneurs. It’s no surprise that under President Obama we have one of the lowest levels of entrepreneurship and small business startups in a generation.”

“That’s what House and Senate Republicans want to do, is lower the regulatory burden. And we know you have to grow the economy from Main Street up, not Washington down.”

Chairman Hensarling on President Obama’s rhetoric aimed at his liberal base:

“I’ll tell you what is fair is having equal opportunity to go out and have a meaningful career and provide financial security for your family. Again, this is all about not the politics of economy growth, it’s about income redistribution, it’s about the politics of division and envy.”

“As the president and his administration continues to vilify success, we have less success. Every time the president aims his rhetoric at Wall Street, his policies are hurting Main Street and hardworking taxpayers are becoming collateral damage.”

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Hensarling Statement on Committee’s Oversight Plan

2015/01/21

Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) delivered the following statement at today’s full committee markup to adopt the committee’s oversight plan for the 114th Congress.  The committee voted unanimously to approve the oversight plan:

The rules of the House require each standing committee to adopt an oversight plan.  The Financial Services Committee meets today to fulfill our obligation under this rule.  And more importantly, we meet to assure America’s hardworking taxpayers that this committee takes this obligation seriously to them.

We will do everything within our power to make sure the agencies under our jurisdiction treat the funds they are appropriated, the funds they have at their disposal, taxpayer funds -- that they treat them with respect. It is not Washington’s money; it’s the taxpayers’ money.  The taxpayers work hard to earn it. They work hard to pay their taxes and they rightfully demand efficiency. They rightfully demand accountability. They rightfully demand measurable results. No one in Washington – Republican or Democrat – should ever be allowed to carelessly spend the hard-eared taxpayers’ money. And that is why this committee will continually and vigilantly monitor every agency and every program under our jurisdiction. Hopefully we feel this is a bipartisan mission and a bipartisan commitment.

If a program isn’t working, if it does more harm than good, it is time to reform it or it is time to get rid of it.  If policies or regulations don’t make common sense, let’s make them sensible.  That will lead to a better economy.

Effective oversight is what makes it possible for us to craft responsible and effective solutions, and I look forward to working with members on both sides of the aisle to meet these challenges.

Although our committee bears the name of the Financial Services Committee, I’ve always considered that our committee probably should be named the Economic Growth, Upward Mobility and Financial Security Committee. And when the American financial system works properly, this is exactly what it helps foster. It fuels entrepreneurship and innovation.  It allows workers to invest in their retirements so they will have a more secure future. It ensures consumers have access to affordable credit so they can make their lives better and take care of their families needs -- everything from a car, to a home, to braces for a kid’s teeth. I have recent and personal knowledge of the cost of the latter.

As all of us know, consumers remain very concerned about the economy.  Still too many live paycheck to paycheck. Too many have seen their paychecks shrink. Americans deserve an economy that meets its full potential. That is something I hope members on both sides of the aisle will be committed to -- that we will have a healthier, more robust economy.  

By no means is the oversight plan that we are submitting today, in no way is it exhaustive.  There is no way a good, realistic plan could be.  But as noted in the plan’s preamble, that does not preclude us from investigating other programs or issues that are not specifically mentioned in the plan, if warranted by circumstances.

This plan was designed and written in a bipartisan spirit. It was designed and written to try to address many, perhaps even most member concerns, not necessarily all. But again it was written, although I’m not a golfer, down the middle of the fairway. It is how it was designed. We listened carefully to try to incorporate a number of member concerns. Again, I believe that this can be a bipartisan plan. I believe its implementation can be bipartisan. I urge its adoption.

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Hearing entitled “Sustainable Housing Finance: An Update from the Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency”

2015/01/20


ICYMI: The Federal Housing Administration’s risky move to lower premiums

2015/01/20

January 20, 2015

 

The Federal Housing Administration’s risky move to lower premiums

By The Washington Post Editorial Board
January 16

Contrary to many confident predictions by its leadership, the Federal Housing Administration needed a $1.7 billion federal bailout in September 2013, the first time in its history that the agency, which insures mortgages for low-income homebuyers, had to seek taxpayer help covering losses in its book of business. In the months after that embarrassing disaster, which was brought on by the FHA’s overly aggressive policies prior to the “Great Recession,” FHA officials assured Congress and the public that it would focus on rebuilding its capital cushion to at least the legal minimum of 2 percent of its portfolio.

Housing lobbies howled about the damage a more cautious policy would do to home sales and mortgage originations — which is to say, their profits. Still, as recently as Nov. 18, the FHA’s acting director, Biniam Gebre, seemed to be resisting the pressure, boasting that the agency’s capital ratio had rebounded to 0.41 percent and saying that “it will continue to build the necessary capital so that it is well-positioned for the future.” Mr. Gebre noted, accurately, that a key factor in the FHA’s return to a semblance of solvency was its having significantly increased the premiums it charged borrowers, “in recognition that the long term viability of the FHA program requires appropriately pricing for expected losses.”

Well, that was then. Now, the Obama administration is back in populist help-the-homebuyer mode, and the president himself last week announced a significant cut in FHA premiums — large enough, Mr. Obama said, to save a typical homebuyer $900 per year. Mortgage bankers and real estate agents welcomed the news, and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro answered concerns that the move might be premature by asserting that it will delay an eventual return to the statutory minimum capital ratio only by a few months. “So now is the right time,” he declared.

No doubt the relatively small slice of the homebuying public — HUD estimates 800,000 borrowers annually, including 100,000 to 200,000 refinancings — that benefits would agree, as would the bankers and real estate agents who profit from FHA-backed business. The policy change certainly addresses the competitive disadvantage for the FHA that was created last year when the administration allowed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to back more of the very same low-money-down mortgages the FHA specializes in.

Taxpayers might legitimately wonder, however, why it’s necessary to take on this additional risk so soon after the FHA’s bailout, before the capital cushion is even halfway rebuilt — and at a time when homebuyers are already enjoying record-low interest rates, plus a windfall from cheaper gasoline. The president’s own estimate of the cash savings from the premium cut implies that it would pump less than $1 billion a year of consumer cash into an economy that is already recovering well without it. The premium reduction takes effect Jan. 26, so the administration can still reconsider, which is what it will do if it has really learned a key lesson of the Great Recession: Finance in general, and mortgage finance in particular, is riskier than it sometimes seems, and the best protection against those risks is a solid core of capital.

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Hensarling: Obama’s ‘Trickle Down’ Taxes Will Hurt Consumers

2015/01/20

Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) issued the following statement in response to President Obama’s plan for higher taxes, including a new tax on lending:

“Hardworking taxpayers deserve a path forward to financial independence, one that gives them more control over their finances.  Unfortunately, if President Obama has his way, hundreds of billions of dollars in new taxes will undeniably trickle down on to consumers.  They’ll face fewer choices, higher costs and less economic freedom.  No amount of White House spin can hide the fact that President Obama’s plan is nothing more than a tax on mortgage loans, car loans and small business loans.  Consumers will find it harder and more expensive to buy cars, homes, major appliances, save for college or start a small business. 

“Americans don't want two sets of rules -- one for the wealthy who'll never need a loan from a bank to buy a car, a new refrigerator or a home, and one for everyone else.  But Obama's plan to put a tax on consumer loans will do exactly that.

“Raising taxes just gives Washington bureaucrats more control to inefficiently spend money without accountability.  Instead, we need to hold Wall Street and Washington accountable.  Dodd-Frank lets Washington designate an entire category of Wall Street firms as ‘Too Big to Fail’ and then creates a taxpayer-financed bailout fund for their use.  Let’s start by ending ‘Too Big to Fail’ and Washington bailouts.  Let’s make sure the bankruptcy code is ready to resolve a large financial institution that gets into trouble so that its shareholders and creditors suffer the consequences of its failure – not U.S. taxpayers.  Instead of hurting consumers, let’s implement prudent and sensible capital and liquidity standards on big banks so our economy is no longer exposed to the risk of systemic failure.

“If the president is really concerned there is too much risk in the financial system, then clearly Dodd-Frank isn’t working as he intended and is thus yet another administration failure.  Its 400 regulations are stifling the Main Street economy.   So let’s cooperate on reforms that will work to make our financial system more stable without hurting those on Main Street who had absolutely nothing to do with causing the financial crisis.”

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Markup to adopt the Committee’s oversight plan for the 114th Congress

2015/01/16


Continuation of Committee Organizational Meeting

2015/01/14


Committee Organizational Meeting

2015/01/09


Hearing entitled “Opportunities for a Private and Competitive Sustainable Flood Insurance Market”

2014/11/13


Hearing entitled “The Impact of International Regulatory Standards on the Competitiveness of U.S. Insurers, Part II”

2014/11/11


Hearing entitled “Terrorist Financing and the Islamic State”

2014/11/06


Hearing entitled “Oversight of the Financial Stability Oversight Council”

2014/09/10


Hearing entitled “An Overview of the Credit Reporting System”

2014/09/03


There is no media available for this committee.

Contact Information

2129 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-7502
Fax 202-226-0471
financialservices.house.gov


Membership

Michele Bachmann

MINNESOTA's 6th DISTRICT

Spencer Bachus

ALABAMA's 6th DISTRICT

Andy Barr

KENTUCKY's 6th DISTRICT

John Campbell

CALIFORNIA's 45th DISTRICT

Shelley Capito

WEST VIRGINIA's 2nd DISTRICT

Tom Cotton

ARKANSAS' 4th DISTRICT

Sean Duffy

WISCONSIN's 7th DISTRICT

Stephen Fincher

TENNESSEE's 8th DISTRICT

Mike Fitzpatrick

PENNSYLVANIA's 8th DISTRICT

Scott Garrett

NEW JERSEY's 5th DISTRICT

Michael Grimm

NEW YORK's 11th DISTRICT

Jeb Hensarling

TEXAS' 5th DISTRICT

Bill Huizenga

MICHIGAN's 2nd DISTRICT

Randy Hultgren

ILLINOIS' 14th DISTRICT

Robert Hurt

VIRGINIA's 5th DISTRICT

Peter King

NEW YORK's 2nd DISTRICT

Frank Lucas

OKLAHOMA's 3rd DISTRICT

Blaine Luetkemeyer

MISSOURI's 3rd DISTRICT

Kevin McCarthy

CALIFORNIA's 23rd DISTRICT

Patrick McHenry

NORTH CAROLINA's 10th DISTRICT

Gary Miller

CALIFORNIA's 31st DISTRICT

Mick Mulvaney

SOUTH CAROLINA's 5th DISTRICT

Randy Neugebauer

TEXAS' 19th DISTRICT

Steve Pearce

NEW MEXICO's 2nd DISTRICT

Robert Pittenger

NORTH CAROLINA's 9th DISTRICT

Bill Posey

FLORIDA's 8th DISTRICT

Dennis Ross

FLORIDA's 15th DISTRICT

Keith Rothfus

PENNSYLVANIA's 12th DISTRICT

Ed Royce

CALIFORNIA's 39th DISTRICT

Steve Stivers

OHIO's 15th DISTRICT

Marlin Stutzman

INDIANA's 3rd DISTRICT

Ann Wagner

MISSOURI's 2nd DISTRICT

Lynn Westmoreland

GEORGIA's 3rd DISTRICT