Appropriations

Committee on Appropriations

Rodney Frelinghuysen

Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2019 Financial Services Bill

2018/05/23

The House Appropriations Committee today released the fiscal year 2019 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill, which will be considered in subcommittee tomorrow. The bill provides annual funding for the Treasury Department, the Judiciary, the Small Business Administration, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and other related agencies.

The bill totals $23.4 billion, which is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The legislation funds programs and activities at U.S. financial agencies that will help boost the economy, ensure a level playing field for U.S. businesses and industries, and prevent financial crime. It also provides the necessary resources to continue the implementation of the recently enacted GOP tax cuts, and contains provisions to continue the roll-back of regulations that put a damper on economic growth. 

“The bill targets resources for important programs that will continue current growth, including providing small businesses – the backbone of our economy – with the loans they need to compete at home and abroad. It also makes important investments to address some of the many challenges facing our nation – providing funding to fight the crushing opioid epidemic and to protect against cyber-crime,” Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen said. “Further, it does this while also demanding tough oversight of federal programs and accountability for the use of every tax dollar.”

Financial Services Subcommittee Chairman Tom Graves also commented on the bill:

“Once again, this bill is a product of an open, inclusive, member-driven process. We brought appropriators and authorizers together. We consulted other committees. We fostered personal, member-to-member conversations to make sure priorities in the bill were vetted and supported across jurisdictions. The end result is a conservative bill that represents the majority views of the House,” Graves said

“The bill brings the rogue, unaccountable Consumer Financial Protection Bureau under the appropriations process, which will finally subject it to congressional oversight and accountability. It also includes many significant financial reforms that slash harmful regulations and streamline outdated agency processes. Additionally, the bill creates the Fund for America’s Kids and Grandkids, which will function as a savings account for future generations. We cut $585 million across the bill to make an initial deposit. The money in this account cannot be spent on any other government program; it’s protected from the spending process and only accessible when our budget deficit is erased. Importantly, this fund sets a new tone for appropriations bills: just because you can spend it, doesn’t mean you should spend it. It’s an approach that causes us to think about what all of this deficit spending means, in whose name we are borrowing the money, and who will get stuck with the debt,” Graves continued.

Bill Highlights:

Internal Revenue Service (IRS) The bill provides $11.6 billion for the IRS – an increase of $186 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Of the funds, $77 million are targeted to help the IRS with implementing the new tax code adopted in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. In total, the bill provides Taxpayer Services an additional $31 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level to support IRS’s customer service – such as phone call and correspondence response times – and funding for fraud prevention, and cybersecurity.

The legislation includes provisions to preserve the safeguards, funding prohibitions, and oversight of taxpayer dollars at the IRS that have been carried in recent prior years. 

Fighting the Opioid Epidemic – The legislation contains $415 million for the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). Within this amount, the bill provides $280 million for High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) and $118 million for other federal drug control programs. 

In addition to these funds, the bill provides an extra $15.4 million over the budget request to the US Postal Service Office of Inspector General to continue drug interdiction efforts and investigations.

Treasury Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence (TFI) – The bill contains $161 million for TFI to safeguard our financial system against illicit use and strengthen the development and enforcement of sanctions programs. 

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) – The bill contains $335 million for the FCC salaries and expenses to support the administration of payments to television and radio broadcasters out of the TV Broadcaster Relocation Fund.

Small Business Administration (SBA) – The bill contains $737 million for the SBA to help promote opportunities for American small businesses to begin, grow, and prosper. This includes full funding to support $30 billion in 7(a) and $7.5 billion in 504 small business loans. Also included is $12.3 million for veterans programs, $18 million for Women’s Business Centers, and $130 million for Small Business Development Centers.

General Services Administration (GSA) The bill allows the GSA to spend $8.6 billion out of the Federal Buildings Fund. This level of funding will cover the rent and other costs of buildings and properties owned or occupied by federal government agencies across the nation. In addition, the bill supports critical infrastructure investment on our nation’s border, providing $276 million to fund the second and final phase of construction of the Calexico, CA, Land Port of Entry.

The bill includes $150 million for the Technology Modernization Fund for upgrades and improvements to IT systems across the government to prevent cybercrimes, terrorism, and intrusion.

Further, the bill includes $31 million for the Asset Proceeds and Space Management Fund. The fund will be used to carry out the recommendations of the Public Buildings Reform Board and reduce the inventory of excess federal property to save taxpayer dollars.

Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Included in the bill is $1.66 billion for the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) salaries and expenses, which is $201 million below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level due to last year’s one-time costs associated with GSA lease renewals.

In addition, the legislation contains policy provisions and reporting requirements to improve transparency, accountability, and fairness and to stop overly burdensome regulation. For example, the bill:

  • Prohibits the agency from requiring the disclosure of political contributions in SEC filings.
  • Title IX contains numerous legislative financial reforms, the vast majority of which have passed the House in the 115th Congress on an overwhelmingly bipartisan vote.

Judiciary Included in the bill is $7.2 billion for the federal courts – an increase of $155 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This will provide sufficient funding for all federal court activities, the supervision of offenders and defendants living in our communities, court security, and the timely and efficient processing of federal cases.

District of Columbia – The bill contains a $751 million federal payment to the District of Columbia which is $30 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Federal payments to the District are primarily to support the courts and other public safety functions and the fiscal year 2019 increases go towards completion of courthouse consolidation projects, and lease and moving costs. It also includes $45 million for the Scholarships for Opportunity and Results Act (SOAR), which provides scholarships to low-income students in DC to attend private schools.

In addition, the legislation:

  • Maintains provisions prohibiting federal and local funds from being used for abortion;
  • Maintains provisions prohibiting further marijuana legalization;
  • Maintains a prohibition on federal funds from being used for needle exchanges and the supervised consumption of any Schedule I substances in the District of Columbia;
  • Prohibits funds for the DC Death with Dignity Act and fully repeals the local legislation; and
  • Prohibits funds for enforcement of DC Reproductive Non-Discrimination Act.

Fund for America’s Kids and Grandkids – The bill includes a new “Fund for America’s Kids and Grandkids” in the amount of $585 million. This account safeguards funds for future generations and is available for obligation only when our budget deficit is erased. The $585 million deposit represents 2.5 percent of the total allocation for this bill. 

Other Legislative Provisions –

  • The bill prohibits the use of funds in the Federal Employee Health Benefits program for abortion.
  • The bill prohibits funding to require that entities applying for or conducting work under federal contracts disclose campaign contributions.
  • The bill includes a provision maintaining the six-day mail delivery requirement for the Postal Service.
  • Title X carries the Email Privacy Act as passed by the House in the 115th Congress.
  • Title XI carries the Amateur Radio Parity Act as passed by the House in the 115th Congress.

For the text of the draft bill, please visit: https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP23/20180524/108372/BILLS-115-SC-AP-FY2019-FServices-FSGGBill.pdf

 

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Chairman Frelinghuysen Announces Subcommittee Assignments for New Appropriations Member Rep. John Rutherford

2018/05/22

House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen today announced subcommittee assignments for the newest member of the Appropriations Committee, Rep. John Rutherford. Congressman Rutherford replaced retiring Rep. Charlie Dent on the Committee.

“John is a very welcome new member of our team, and his hard work ethic and expertise on a wide range of issues will be put to good use. The Appropriations Committee is in the midst of an extremely busy and rapidly progressing budget season, and we look forward to having John join our efforts to responsibly fund the federal government,” Chairman Frelinghuysen said.

Rep. John Rutherford will serve on the following subcommittees:

Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development

Subcommittee on State and Foreign Operations

Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch

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Subcommittee Markup - FY 2019 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Bill

2018/05/21


Full Committee Markup - FY 2019 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Bill and FY 2019 Report on the Suballocation of Budget Allocations (302(b)s)

2018/05/18


Committee Approves Fiscal Year 2019 Commerce, Justice, Science Appropriations Bill

2018/05/17

The House Appropriations Committee today approved the fiscal year 2019 Commerce, Justice, Science (CJS) Appropriations bill on a vote of 32-19. The bill funds the Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the decennial census, and other related programs.

The legislation contains $62.5 billion in total discretionary funding, an increase of $2.9 billion above the fiscal year 2018 level. The bill provides increases for federal law enforcement to crack down on illegal immigration, violent crime, gangs and opioid trafficking. The bill targets funding increases for national security – including countering cybercrime, terrorism and espionage.  Funds are included to continue investments in space exploration, and advance groundbreaking science, enhance school safety, and provide adequate resources for the upcoming decennial census.

“This bill provides funding for many critically important programs. It prioritizes national security and law enforcement, including activities that will continue the fight against illegal drugs. It invests in scientific research that will help our nation be successful for generations to come. It will support programs to keep our children and our schools safe. And, it will ensure the proper resources are available to conduct a responsible census so that all communities can be fairly represented,” House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen said.

“This bill invests our hard-earned tax dollars into the safety and security of our nation. It ensures that our federal law enforcement officers have the resources they need to fight drug and human trafficking, secure our borders, increase investigations into terrorism, and prosecute drug dealers. It prioritizes the protection of women against violence and helps prosecutors address sexual assault in our communities,” said CJS Subcommittee Chairman John Culberson. “It supports critical medical and scientific research so that we’re able to tackle the economic and technological challenges of the digital age. Additionally, it continues NASA’s record-level funding, setting the agency on the trajectory to rise above and beyond the glory days of Apollo.”

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full committee today:

Rep. Culberson – The manager’s amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Valadao – The amendment prohibits funding for the Commerce Department to implement or administer new rules on certain California dam hydroelectric projects. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Joyce – The amendment prohibits funding to prevent states from implementing their own medical marijuana laws. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. McCollum – The amendment changes Justice Department funding designations for Native Americans. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Ruppersberger – The amendment prohibits funds to be used in contravention of the ZTE suspension order. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Ruppersberger – The amendment targets $2 million to halt illegal cell phone use in prisons. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Harris ­– The amendment urges the Drug Enforcement Administration to expeditiously process medical marijuana research applications. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

For a bill summary, please click here.

For the text of the bill, please click here.

For the bill report, please click here.

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POSTPONED: Full Committee Markup - Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies

2018/05/17


Appropriations Committee Approves the Fiscal Year 2019 Agriculture Appropriations Bill

2018/05/16

The House Appropriations Committee today approved the fiscal year 2019 Agriculture Appropriations bill on a vote of 31-20.

The bill funds important agricultural and food programs and services, including food and medical product safety, animal and plant health programs, rural development and farm services, agricultural trade, financial marketplace oversight, and nutrition programs.

Total discretionary funding in the legislation is $23.27 billion, which is $14 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. In total, the bill allows for $145.09 billion in both discretionary and mandatory funding – $922 million below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The legislation prioritizes this funding for programs supporting rural communities, farmers, ranchers, food and drug safety, rural infrastructure, and nutrition for those in need. In addition, the bill contains several policy provisions to rein in unnecessary and burdensome regulations that harm U.S. food producers and that impede growth in important U.S. industries. 

“This legislation supports the safety and the productivity of our nation’s food supply – providing resources that help our farmers and ranchers do their jobs, ensure healthy food is on all our tables, and promote stability and security by ensuring we can rely on U.S. food production here at home,” House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen said. “It will also protect families from food insecurity, support growth in rural communities, and increase the safety of the drugs and medical devices that we all may need in our lives.”

“For far too long, Washington has looked at rural America as an expanse in between the cities and their suburbs, as opposed to the backbone of America. Yet, these are the people that raise our cattle, work in the factories that dot rural landscapes, and till the land in order to provide food for our plate. This bill today continues to fulfill the commitment President Trump made to invest in rural America. The Rural Development account in the bill contains over $620 million dollars of continued commitment to expanding rural broadband and erasing the rural digital divide. Combined with the $685 million dollars in the recently passed Omnibus, Congress is ensuring that the days of looking past rural America are over,” Subcommittee Chairman Robert Aderholt said. “In addition, access to high-speed internet is now just as important to a high-quality of life as electricity, water, and sewer. As a country, we cannot allow large sections of our population to be cut off from the rest of the world, and therefore, be cut off from economic opportunities.”

The following amendments to the FY 2019 Agriculture Appropriations bill were adopted by the full committee today:

Rep. Aderholt – The amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.  

Rep. Lee – The amendment increases the Healthy Food Financing Initiative by $1 million. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Cole/Rep. Bishop – The amendment adds bill language to modernize the February 2007 predicate date for certain tobacco products. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 29-20.

Rep. Young – The amendment adds bill language to ensure that disclosure requirements related to genetically engineered salmon and finfish be made in accordance with the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Simpson/Rep. Pingree – The amendment adds bill language preventing the USDA from disallowing potatoes as part of the school breakfast program. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Newhouse/Rep. Bishop – The amendment adds bill language to protect SNAP retailers from certain invasive disclosure requirements. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Harris – The amendment adds report language to require an FDA report on adverse health events linked to attorney or lead generators advertisements, and to collaborate with the FTC to address patient safety concerns. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Newhouse – The amendment adds report language directing the Secretary of Agriculture to work with other federal agencies to establish a comprehensive online system for agriculture employers to complete the H-2A applications process. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

For a summary of the bill, please click here.

For the text of the bill, please click here.

For the bill report, please click here.

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Chairman Frelinghuysen Announces Committee and Subcommittee Membership Changes

2018/05/16

House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen today announced several membership changes to the Committee and several Subcommittees. These changes were approved by the House Republican Conference this morning.

“We are in the midst of a very aggressive and busy appropriations season. With the retirement of one of our great Subcommittee Chairmen, Charlie Dent, we needed to bring a new Member on board, and have made additional changes in Subcommittee leadership as well,” Chairman Frelinghuysen said. “We welcome Rep. John Rutherford to the Committee, and congratulate the Chairs on their new positions. I look forward to working closely with them over the next weeks and months to complete all 12 Appropriations bills in the House, and to fulfill our fiscal commitments to the country and the American people.”

The Committee changes are as follows:

New Member of the House Appropriations Committee – Rep. John Rutherford (R-FL)

Chairman, Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs – Rep. John Carter (R-TX) (Previously Rep. Charlie Dent)

Chairman, Subcommittee on Homeland Security – Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS) (Previously Rep. John Carter)

Chairman, Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch – Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen (Previously Rep. Kevin Yoder)

 

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Appropriations Committee Approves Fiscal Year 2019 Energy and Water Appropriations Bill

2018/05/16

The House Appropriations Committee today approved the fiscal year 2019 Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations bill on a vote of 29-20.  The legislation provides annual funding for national defense nuclear weapons activities, the Army Corps of Engineers, various programs under the Department of Energy (DOE), and other related agencies. 

The bill totals $44.7 billion – $1.5 billion above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $8.17 billion above the President’s budget request. Funding is targeted toward national security efforts – including nuclear weapons activities – and energy and water infrastructure investments. This level is in line with the overall discretionary caps put in place through the two-year budget cap agreement.

“This legislation will provide the resources to ensure America has the strongest possible nuclear deterrent, which is critically important during this time of rapidly changing global dynamics and emerging threats,” House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen said. “This bill also makes important investments in our water and power infrastructure that will help our economy continue to grow and provide a platform on which our businesses, industries, and communities can thrive.”

Energy and Water Subcommittee Chairman Mike Simpson also commented on the importance of the bill:

“This is a well-balanced bill that places emphasis where it is needed most: meeting critical national security needs and investing in our nation's infrastructure," Chairman Simpson said.  "It prioritizes the maintenance and security of our nuclear weapons stockpile, while also supporting infrastructure projects and strategic research and development that will increase U.S. economic growth and competitiveness.”

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full committee today:

Rep. Simpson – The manager’s amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

For a summary of the bill, please click here.

For the text of the draft bill, please click here.

For the draft bill report, please click here.

 

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Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2019 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Funding Bill

2018/05/15

The House Appropriations Committee today released the fiscal year 2019 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development funding bill, which will be considered in subcommittee tomorrow. The legislation includes funding for the Department of Transportation, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and other related agencies.

In total, the bill reflects an allocation of $71.8 billion in discretionary spending – $1.5 billion above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $23.8 billion above the request. The allocation reflects the second year of the bipartisan budget agreement, and again targets resources to rebuild our nation’s infrastructure, including airports, roads, bridges, and rail. This funding will support critical infrastructure investments at the state and local level, and will provide needed resources for community development and essential housing programs. 

“For too long, the transportation infrastructure in our nation has been neglected, which has dampened growth and efficiency. This bill will provide a much-needed boost in funding for improvements in our infrastructure system – whether it is roads, rail, transit systems, or air and waterways,” Committee Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen said. “It also supports core community and housing programs to ensure shelter for our most vulnerable citizens, and to provide better opportunity for our local communities to thrive.”

“I am pleased to present this legislation that builds on the investments made to our nation’s infrastructure in last year’s bill. I worked with Chairman Frelinghuysen and Ranking Member Price to ensure vital programs continue to receive strong funding levels, while eliminating wasteful bureaucratic spending and protecting taxpayer dollars. The President has made it a priority to invest in our nation’s infrastructure, and I am glad we were able to deliver historic levels of funding for the second year in a row. This is another down payment towards rebuilding our nation’s roads, bridges and rail systems, while also providing critical housing improvements for our most vulnerable populations. I look forward to reviewing the bill with the Appropriations Committee and moving it to the floor for consideration by our colleagues,” Subcommittee Chairman Mario Diaz-Balart said.

Bill Highlights:

Department of Transportation (DOT) – The bill includes $27.8 billion in discretionary appropriations for the Department of Transportation for fiscal year 2019. This is $542 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $11.7 billion above the President’s request. In total budgetary resources, including offsetting collections, the bill provides $87.8 billion to improve and maintain our nation’s transportation infrastructure.

The bill targets funding to programs and projects that will increase efficiency, safety, reliability, and quality of life for the traveling public, and will help create jobs and spur economic growth.

  • Trucking regulatory relief – The bill provides regulatory relief to industry by extending the prohibition on enforcement of the Electronic Logging Device regulation in the case of livestock and insect haulers, and facilitates interstate commerce by affirming a uniform hours of service rule

  • BUILD (National Infrastructure Investments) – The multimodal BUILD program (formerly known as TIGER) is funded at $750 million. This program will fund states’ and local communities’ most critical transportation projects. Language is included to ensure a balanced allocation of funding among rural, suburban, and urban areas, and $250 million is set aside for port projects

  • Air – Included in the legislation is $17.7 billion in total budgetary resources for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) – $310 million below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $1.6 billion above the request. This will provide full funding for all air traffic control personnel, including 14,500 air traffic controllers, 7,400 safety inspectors, and operational support personnel. The bill provides $1.3 billion for FAA’s Next Generation Air Transportation (NextGen) program to continue to ease congestion, reduce noise, and improve safety. The bill provides $168 million for the Contract Tower program to maintain service at current towers and bring new qualifying towers into the system.

  • Highways – The bill allows $46 billion from the Highway Trust Fund to be spent on the Federal-aid Highways Program, which is $1 billion above the fiscal year 2018 level. This funding mirrors the authorized levels and will provide much-needed growth and improvements within America’s highway system. In addition, the bill provides an extra $4.25 billion in discretionary highway funding – a total increase of $2.76 billion for roads and bridges over fiscal year 2018. Within these amounts, $150 million is included to augment the Tribal Transportation Program and to fund projects of national significance on federal and tribal lands

  • Rail Federal investments in rail infrastructure and safety programs are funded at $3.2 billion, $62.5 million over the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $2.1 billion above the request.

    Rail safety and research programs are funded at $262.3 million, equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $40.4 million above the request. This will fund inspectors and training, plus maintenance and safety investments to the physical rail infrastructure, to help ensure the safety of passengers and local communities.

    The bill provides a total of $1.9 billion for Amtrak, of which $650 million is for the Northeast Corridor and $1.3 billion is to support the national network. The bill also continues to require overtime limits for Amtrak employees to reduce unnecessary costs.

    Federal-State Partnership for State of Good Repair grants are funded at $500 million, which is $250 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This funding will address critical rail investments nationwide and on the Northeast Corridor – needs that must be addressed to sustain current rail services.

    Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements grants are funded at $300 million, a decrease of $292.5 million from the fiscal year 2018 enacted level, to fund capital and safety improvements, planning, environmental work, and research. Within this amount, the bill includes $150 million for grants to rail operators to install positive train control (PTC) technologies, which will significantly improve the safety of our rail system.

    The Magnetic Levitation Deployment Program is funded at $150 million. This funding will provide the federal investment required to leverage billions in private investment and deploy this advanced technology on the nation’s most congested transportation corridors.

    The bill prohibits funding for high-speed rail in California, the California High-Speed Rail Authority, and for the Federal Railroad Administration to administer a grant agreement with the Authority that contains a tapered match. The bill also prohibits the Surface Transportation Board from taking action regarding the construction of high-speed rail in California unless the Board has jurisdiction over the entire project.

  • Transit – The bill provides $13.6 billion in total budgetary resources for the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) – $141 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $2.5 billion above the request. Transit formula grants total $9.9 billion – consistent with the FAST Act – to help local communities build, maintain, and ensure the safety of their mass transit systems.

    Within this amount, $2.6 billion is included for Capital Investment Grants projects, of which $1 billion is included for current Full Funding Grant Agreements (FFGAs), and $1 billion is dedicated to new projects. These programs provide competitive grant funding for major transit capital investments – including light rail, bus rapid transit, and commuter rail – that are planned and operated by local communities.

    Bill language limits the federal match for New Starts projects to 50 percent.

    The bill provides an additional $800 million in transit infrastructure grants – $34 million less than the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This includes $350 million to help communities modernize their bus systems, $250 million in formula grants to assist both rural and urbanized areas invest in transit, and $200 million for capital assistance to transit systems across the country to maintain a state of good repair.

  • Maritime The legislation includes $830.2 million for the Maritime Administration, $149.4 million below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $133.8 million above the request. This funding will continue to increase the productivity, efficiency, and safety of the nation’s ports and intermodal water and land transportation.

    The Maritime Security Program is funded at the full authorized level of $300 million. In addition, the bill provides $300 million for a new national security multi-mission vessel, $30 million to refurbish a training ship for state maritime schools, and provides $88.6 million for the United States Merchant Marine Academy, including $18 million for capital improvements and repairs.

  • Safety – The legislation contains funding for the various transportation safety programs and agencies within the Department of Transportation. This includes $982 million in total budgetary resources for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) – an increase of $67 million over the fiscal year 2018 enacted level – and $666 million is included for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, as authorized under the FAST Act. Also included is $275 million for the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, an increase of $3 million over the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.

Housing and Urban Development (HUD) – The legislation includes a net discretionary total of $43.6 billion for the Department of Housing and Urban Development, an increase $941 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $11.9 billion above the request.

  • Section 8 and Public and Native American Housing – Included in the bill is $30.8 billion for Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers and Public and Indian Housing programs. This is an increase of $455 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This funding level will continue assistance to families and individuals currently served by these programs and provide additional assistance for vulnerable populations, including:
    • Vouchers for Persons with Disabilities – $390 million is provided to support existing voucher holders and serve 30,000 additional non-elderly disabled households.
    • Vouchers for Veterans – In addition to all current HUD-VASH vouchers, $40 million is provided to house additional homeless veterans.
    • Vouchers for Families with Children – $20 million is provided to help families with children break the cycle of poverty and achieve economic independence by moving closer to job opportunities and better schools.
    • Competitive Tribal Grants – $100 million is provided to support the most pressing affordable housing needs in Indian Country.

  • Community Planning and Development – The bill includes $7.6 billion for Community Planning and Development programs – $115 million below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    • Community Development Block Grants are funded at $3.3 billion, equal to the fiscal year 2018 level. These block grants provide critical infrastructure dollars to states and local communities to address economic development and housing needs.
    • The HOME Investment Partnerships Program is funded at $1.2 billion, $162 million below the enacted level. These funds are provided by formula to local jurisdictions, which leverage funding to create affordable housing stock in partnership with private investors.
    • Homeless Assistance Grants are funded at $2.5 billion, $33 million above the enacted level. This funding will renew all current agreements with local homeless service providers. In addition, targeted funding is provided to address geographic areas that have seen an increase in homelessness, and to provide assistance to victims of domestic violence.                                                                              

  • Other Housing Programs – The bill provides $12.6 billion for other housing programs, $101 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level, and $655 million above the request. The bulk of this increase is needed to continue existing assistance to all those currently served by these programs, including elderly and disabled families. Of this total, the bill provides $11.7 billion for Project-Based Rental Assistance, $232 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $600 million above the request. In addition, the bill provides $632 million for Housing for the Elderly and $154 million for Housing for Persons with Disabilities.

  • Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes – Lead hazard reduction grants are funded at $230 million, equal to the enacted level, for grants to target lead-based paint abatement needs and to protect children from housing-related health and safety concerns

For the subcommittee draft text of the legislation, please click here.

 

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Full Committee Markup - FY 2019 Commerce, Justice, and Science Appropriations Bill

2018/05/14


Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2019 Interior and Environment Bill

2018/05/14

In total, the bill provides $35.252 billion, equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. These funds are targeted to important programs that support and protect the nation’s natural resources, including $3.9 billion for the Department of the Interior and U.S. Forest Service to prevent and combat devastating wildfires. The legislation also contains several policy provisions to rein in harmful and unnecessary regulations at the EPA and other agencies.

“The bill ensures that funding is targeted to maintaining the health and safety of our public lands – including the protection from and the fighting of devastating wildfires – and will help protect vital national resources for generations to come,” House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen said. “In addition, it continues the hand-in-hand work with the Administration to stop economically harmful, unnecessary regulations at the Environmental Protection Agency and others, to make sure core U.S. industries have the opportunities they need to thrive.”

“The Interior Subcommittee has made every effort to balance a host of competing needs and provided the Interior Department, EPA and other agencies under our jurisdiction with the resources necessary to carry out their mission. Our bill funds a number of American priorities like our National Park Service, the Smithsonian, Native American programs, efforts to prevent and combat wildfires, and the development of an earthquake early warning system for the West Coast. Once again we provide important funding for EPA programs that clean our environment, but do not increase the size of the federal bureaucracy. I appreciate the input of all of our Subcommittee members,” Interior Subcommittee Chairman Ken Calvert said.

Highlights:

Wildland Firefighting and Prevention – In total, the bill funds wildland firefighting and prevention programs at $3.9 billion, fully funding the 10-year average for wildland fire suppression costs for both the Department of the Interior and the Forest Service, and providing robust additional funding – $500 million– for Forest Service suppression operations. The legislation also includes $655 million for hazardous fuels management, which is $30 million above the fiscal year 2018 level.

Federal Payments to Local Communities – The bill provides $500 million for “Payments In Lieu of Taxes” (PILT), $35 million above the budget request. PILT provides funds for local governments in 49 states to help offset losses in property taxes due to nontaxable federal lands within their counties. Without congressional action, many rural communities would face huge budget shortfalls impacting public safety, education, and other local government responsibilities.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – The bill funds EPA at $7.958 billion, $100 million below the fiscal year 2018 level.  Within this total, EPA’s regulatory programs are reduced by $228 million below the current level. The legislation supports the President’s proposal to reshape the Agency’s workforce by providing resources requested to offer buyouts and voluntary separation agreements to employees.

The bill also targets additional funding provided by the recent budget agreement to infrastructure programs, including:

  • A total of $2.6 billion for the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Loan fund, which states and localities use for water infrastructure projects;
  • An increase of $40 million to accelerate the cleanup of Superfund sites to return them to productive use and spur economic development; and
  • A total of $75 million for the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) program to leverage federal dollars to provide financing for more than $8 billion in water infrastructure projects.

This bill reflects the Administration’s goal to rein in outdated, unnecessary and potentially harmful regulations at the EPA. For example, it includes a full repeal of the economically damaging “Waters of the United States” regulation.

Also included is bill language prohibiting the regulation of lead content of ammunition and fishing tackle, relieving livestock operations from EPA permitting requirements, and exempting livestock producers from EPA greenhouse gas regulations.

Also included is a multiple agency directive to EPA, USDA, and DOE to establish clear policies that reflect the carbon neutrality of biomass, as well as a provision prohibiting EPA from making changes to certain agricultural exemptions under the Clean Water Act.

Native American Programs – The bill increases the Federal commitment to honoring government-to-government treaty and Trust agreements entered into with American Indians and Alaska Natives.  The Indian Health Service is funded at $5.9 billion, $370 million above the fiscal year 2018 level.  The Bureaus of Indian Affairs and Indian Education are funded at $3.1 billion, $40 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.  Proposed cuts are restored and fixed costs are funded.  Increases are provided for staffing newly constructed hospitals; urban health clinics; the Indian Health Care Improvement Fund; road maintenance; police officers and courts; schools and colleges; economic development; and forest management.  Contract Support Costs continue to be fully funded.

Office of Surface Mining (OSM) – The OSM is funded at $229 million in the bill. This includes $90 million to continue a pilot program to accelerate the reclamation of abandoned mine lands, which will help boost community redevelopment and economic growth. The legislation also continues state regulatory grants at $68 million.

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) The bill contains $1.4 billion for the BLM, an increase of $55 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.

The bill provides $60 million, equal to the fiscal year 2018 level, for on-the-ground sage grouse conservation to protect the species and to preserve federal lands for public and private uses, such as energy development, ranching, recreation, and military training. The bill also includes a $6.2 million increase to expand energy and mineral development.  

National Park Service (NPS) – The legislation includes $3.25 billion for the NPS, an increase of $53 million above the fiscal year 2018 level. Within the total, the bill provides an additional $50 million in funding for park operations. The bill also includes a $175 million increase above fiscal year 2018 levels to address longstanding deferred maintenance needs, including a $40 million increase for maintenance, repair, and rehabilitation projects, and a $135 million increase for deferred maintenance of park service facilities. 

U.S. Forest Service – The bill includes $6.1 billion for the Forest Service, of which $3 billion is targeted to wildland fire prevention and suppression. The bill also provides a $19.5 million increase to combat pests, diseases, and invasive species in our Nation’s forests and includes a provision prohibiting the Forest Service or BLM from issuing new closures of public lands to hunting and recreational shooting, except in the case of public safety.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) – The FWS is funded at $1.6 billion, an $11 million decrease below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.  Significant investments continue to be made to reduce the deferred maintenance backlogs within the National Wildlife Refuge System and the National Fish Hatchery System and to ensure that all fish hatcheries continue to operate.  Funding to recover and delist threatened and endangered species is increased by $5.5 million, including a $2.5 million increase for Recovery Challenge matching grants to share the costs of recovery with corporate and other non-governmental partners.  Proposed cuts are restored to the National Wildlife Refuge Fund and other cost-shared grant programs, including the North American Wetlands Conservation Fund, which is increased by $2 million.  Bill language is included to delist recovered gray wolves and prevent the unnecessary listing of greater sage-grouse.  Strong budgets continue for fighting invasive species and illegal wildlife trafficking.

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) – The bill includes $1.2 billion for the USGS, $19 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Funding is targeted to critical infrastructure investments in natural hazards programs, streamgages, the groundwater monitoring network, and critical materials mapping activities. The bill includes $21 million for an earthquake early warning system to help save lives during natural disasters; a $13 million increase for the streamgage network; and $11 million for the Three Dimensional Mapping and Economic Empowerment Program.  The bill also fully funds the development of “Landsat 9” – a satellite program that provides land use measurements that are important to local communities for agriculture, forestry, energy and water resource decisions.

Smithsonian Institution – The Smithsonian Institution is funded at $1 billion in the bill, $12 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This level is sufficient to allow all current operations and programs to continue. The bill also includes $225 million toward the multi-year renovation of the National Air and Space Museum.

National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities – The bill includes $155 million for each of the endowments, $2 million above the fiscal year 2018 level for each endowment.

Eisenhower Memorial Commission The bill provides $1.8 million for salaries and expenses for the Eisenhower Memorial Commission.  Funding to complete construction was provided in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018.

Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) The bill provides $360 million for LWCF programs. State and local recreation and battlefield preservation programs are prioritized with 62 percent of the funding going to NPS State Assistance, Forest Legacy, American Battlefield Protection, and Highlands Conservation Act programs.

Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) The CSB is funded at $12 million, $1 million above the fiscal year 2018 level.

For the text of the draft bill, please click here.

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Subcommittee Markup - FY 2019 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill

2018/05/11


Full Committee Markup - FY 2019 Energy and Water and Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill

2018/05/11


Subcommittee Markup - FY 2019 Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill

2018/05/10


Fiscal Year 2019 Commerce, Justice, Science Appropriations Bill Released

2018/05/08

The House Appropriations Committee today released the fiscal year 2019 Commerce, Justice, Science (CJS) Appropriations bill. The bill funds the Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the decennial census, and other related programs.

The legislation contains $62.5 billion in total discretionary funding, an increase of $2.9 billion above the fiscal year 2018 level. The bill provides increases for federal law enforcement to crack down on illegal immigration, violent crime, gangs and opioid trafficking. The bill targets funding increases for national security – including countering cybercrime, terrorism and espionage. Funds are included to continue investments in space exploration, advance groundbreaking science, enhance school safety, and provide adequate resources for the upcoming decennial census.

“This bill provides funding for many critically important programs. It prioritizes national security and law enforcement, including activities that will continue the fight against illegal drugs. It invests in scientific research that will help our nation be successful for generations to come. It will support programs to keep our children and our schools safe. And it will ensure the proper resources are available to conduct a responsible census so that all communities can be fairly represented,” House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen said.

“This bill invests our hard-earned tax dollars into the safety and security of our nation. It ensures that our federal law enforcement officers have the resources they need to fight drug and human trafficking, secure our borders, increase investigations into terrorism, and prosecute drug dealers. It prioritizes the protection of women against violence and helps prosecutors address sexual assault in our communities,” said CJS Subcommittee Chairman John Culberson. “It supports critical medical and scientific research so that we’re able to tackle the economic and technological challenges of the digital age. Additionally, it continues NASA’s record-level funding, setting the agency on the trajectory to rise above and beyond the glory days of Apollo.”

Bill Highlights:

Anti-Opioid Abuse – Opioid abuse is a national epidemic, killing more people than car crashes each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bill includes $447 million for grant programs to help stem this abuse. This includes funding for activities such as drug courts, treatment, prescription drug monitoring, overdose-reversal drugs, and at-risk youth programs. In addition, the bill increases federal law enforcement resources to investigate and prosecute drug traffickers.

Gun Crimes and School Safety – The bill increases resources for multiple programs that reduce violent and gun crime, including fully funding the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background Check System; increasing funds for U.S. Attorneys and the Marshals Service to address violent crime; provides $75 million in grants to states to improve their records used in background checks; $50 million in grants to reduce gang and gun violence; $100 million as authorized by the STOP School Violence Act; $100 million for youth mentoring programs; and $20 million for police active shooter training.

Department of Justice (DOJ) The bill funds DOJ at $30.7 billion, an increase of $793 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. These investments will give federal law enforcement more tools to thwart violent crime, drug and human traffickers, and terrorism, and bring criminals to justice.

  • Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) Funding for EOIR is increased by $126 million above fiscal year 2018, for a total of $630 million. This increase annualizes the additional 100 immigration judge teams the Committee provided in the fiscal year 2018 Omnibus and provides funds for 100 additional immigration judge teams in fiscal year 2019. This addition of 200 new immigration judge teams over a two-year period should drastically reduce the immigration case backlog.
  • United States Attorneys (USA) – The bill includes $2.3 billion for USA operations – an increase of $113 million above fiscal year 2018 to increase prosecutions of drug and human traffickers, violent criminals, criminal aliens, cybercriminals and terrorists.
  • Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) – The DEA is funded at $2.7 billion – $130 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.

    Within the DEA, priority is placed on anti-opioid and other illegal drug enforcement efforts by providing additional heroin enforcement teams, additional agents and equipment for opioid enforcement efforts, and additional resources to disrupt transnational organized crime. The bill also includes $421 million in the Diversion Control Program to enhance opioid diversion investigations and prosecutions. In addition, the bill provides $570 million for Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Forces, a $27 million increase over the current level, to target major drug trafficking organizations.

  • U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) – The bill includes $3 billion for the USMS, an increase of $85 million above fiscal year 2018. This funding will strengthen fugitive apprehension efforts, provide additional resources for court security and prisoner transportation, and fund the increasing detainee population resulting from more vigorous violent, drug trafficking, and immigration crime enforcement initiatives.
  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) – The legislation contains $1.3 billion for the ATF, $23 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This funding will provide additional resources to reduce violent crime and expedite licensing applications. The bill continues all legislative provisions carried in previous years to protect the Second Amendment rights of all Americans.
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) – The bill includes $9.3 billion for the FBI – a reduction of $81 million below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The bill increases funding for critical functions of the FBI, including anti-cybercrime, counterterrorism, counterintelligence, human trafficking investigations, and NICS gun background checks while reducing construction funding.

    • Grant Programs The bill includes a total of $2.9 billion for various state and local law enforcement assistance grant programs including:
      • $493 million for Violence Against Women Act programs
      • $442 million for Byrne Justice Assistance Grants
      • $255 million for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program
      • $130 million for DNA Initiative Grants
      • $48 million for Reduce Sexual Assault Kits Backlog grants
      • $100 million for Anti-Human Trafficking grants
      • $380 million for Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act grants
      • $76 million for Missing and Exploited Children programs.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) – NASA is funded at $21.5 billion, $810 million above the 2018 enacted level. This funding includes:

  • $5.1 billion for Deep Space Exploration Systems – $294 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This includes funding to continue the development of the Orion crew vehicle, Space Launch System, and related ground systems.
  • $6.7 billion for NASA Science programs – $459 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This targets funding to planetary and other sciences to ensure the continuation of groundbreaking scientific missions.
  • The bill fully funds the requested amounts for robotic and human exploration of the moon, including $504.2 million for the lunar orbital platform; $116.5 million for advanced lunar and surface capabilities; $218 million for planetary science, including rovers and science instruments; and $150 million for commercial low-earth orbit development.

Department of Commerce – The bill includes $12.1 billion for the Commerce Department, an increase of $1 billion above the 2018 enacted level. This includes funding for the following agencies:

  • Bureau of the Census – The bill provides $4.8 billion for the Bureau of the Census to ramp up for the 2020 Decennial Census. The funding provided in the bill is a down payment on the total cost of the next census, which the Administration estimates will total more than $15 billion. These funds will cover activities such as technology improvements, address listing, and opening of Census field offices.
  • Economic Development Administration (EDA) – The legislation includes $302 million for the EDA, the fiscal year 2018 level. These funds will help innovative community development, coal communities, and boost economically recovering communities.
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) NIST is funded at $985 million in the bill, including $140 million for the Manufacturing Extension Partnerships program and $720 million for core research activities to help advance U.S. competitiveness and economic growth, while lower-priority activities are reduced.
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) The legislation contains $5.2 billion for NOAA, which is $751 million below the fiscal year 2018 level. Funding is targeted to important priorities such as the National Weather Service, the reduction of harmful algal blooms, fisheries management, weather research, and ocean exploration while reducing funds for lower-priority programs and one-time investments made in fiscal year 2018.

The bill also includes full funding to continue the current Joint Polar Satellite System weather satellite program and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite program to help maintain and improve weather forecasting to warn communities about potentially devastating natural disasters.

National Science Foundation (NSF) – The legislation funds NSF at $8.2 billion – $408 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Research and related activities are funded at $6.7 billion, $317 million above the current level. These funds will foster innovation and U.S. economic competitiveness, including funding for research on advanced manufacturing, physics, mathematics, cybersecurity, neuroscience, and STEM education. The bill also invests in important scientific infrastructure such as modernization of Antarctica facilities along with telescopes and research vessels.

Other Provisions The bill includes several policy provisions, such as:

  • Continuing a prohibition on the transfer or release of Guantanamo detainees into the U.S.;
  • Continuing various existing provisions related to firearms, such as a prohibition on the implementation of the UN Arms Trade Treaty, and makes four of these provisions permanent;
  • Prohibiting unauthorized reporting and registration requirements on consumers purchasing multiple rifles or shotguns;
  • Prohibiting NASA, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the National Space Council from engaging in bilateral activities with China unless authorized or certified via procedures established in the bill;
  • Preventing settlement money from going to activist groups by prohibiting the Justice Department from entering into civil settlement agreements in which a defendant is required to make a donation to a third party;
  • Countering cyberespionage by requiring agencies to conduct supply chain reviews before procuring sensitive information technology systems; and
  • Continuing existing policies related to the sanctity of life.

For the draft text of the bill, please visit: https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP19/20180509/108286/BILLS-115HR-SC-AP-FY2019-CJS-SubcommitteeDraft.pdf

 

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Appropriations Committee Unveils the Fiscal Year 2019 Agriculture Appropriations Bill

2018/05/08

The House Appropriations Committee today unveiled the fiscal year 2019 Agriculture Appropriations bill, which will be considered in a subcommittee markup tomorrow.

The bill funds important agricultural and food programs and services, including food and medical product safety, animal and plant health programs, rural development and farm services, agricultural trade, financial marketplace oversight, and nutrition programs.

Total discretionary funding in the legislation is $23.27 billion, which is $14 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. In total, the bill allows for $145.09 billion in both discretionary and mandatory funding – $922 million below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The legislation prioritizes this funding for programs supporting rural communities, farmers, ranchers, food and drug safety, rural infrastructure, and nutrition for those in need. In addition, the bill contains several policy provisions to rein in unnecessary and burdensome regulations that harm U.S. food producers and that impede growth in important U.S. industries. 

“This legislation supports the safety and the productivity of our nation’s food supply – providing resources that help our farmers and ranchers do their jobs, ensure healthy food is on all our tables, and promote stability and security by ensuring we can rely on U.S. food production here at home,” House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen said. “It will also protect families from food insecurity, support growth in rural communities, and increase the safety of the drugs and medical devices that we all may need in our lives.”

“For far too long, Washington has looked at rural America as an expanse in between the cities and their suburbs, as opposed to the backbone of America. Yet, these are the people that raise our cattle, work in the factories that dot rural landscapes, and till the land in order to provide food for our plate. This bill today continues to fulfill the commitment President Trump made to invest in rural America. The Rural Development account in the bill contains over $620 million dollars of continued commitment to expanding rural broadband and erasing the rural digital divide. Combined with the $685 million dollars in the recently passed Omnibus, Congress is ensuring that the days of looking past rural America are over,” Subcommittee Chairman Robert Aderholt said. “In addition, access to high-speed internet is now just as important to a high-quality of life as electricity, water, and sewer. As a country, we cannot allow large sections of our population to be cut off from the rest of the world, and therefore, be cut off from economic opportunities.”

Bill Highlights:

Rural Development and Infrastructure The bill provides a total of more than $3.079 billion for rural development programs. These programs help create an environment for economic growth by providing business and housing opportunities and building sustainable rural infrastructure for the modern economy.

  • Critical Infrastructure – The legislation includes responsible investments in infrastructure to help rural areas of the country access basic utilities. This includes more than $1.45 billion for rural water and waste program loans, and over $637 million in water and waste grants for clean and reliable drinking water systems and sanitary waste disposal systems. An additional $6.9 billion in loan authority is provided for rural electric and telephone infrastructure loans, the same level as fiscal year 2018.
  • Rural Broadband – The legislation invests over $620 million in the expansion of broadband service to provide economic development opportunities and improved education and healthcare services. Funding is included through loan and grants including the Broadband Loan, Community Connect, Distance Learning and Telemedicine programs and a broadband pilot program.
  • Rural Housing Loans and Rental Assistance – The bill provides a total of $24 billion in loan authority for the Single Family Housing guaranteed loan program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. In addition, the bill includes $1 billion in direct loans, which provide home loan assistance to low-income rural families – many of whom would have few loan options for purchasing a home because of their geographical location. In addition, $1.33 billion is provided for rental assistance for affordable rental housing for low-income families and the elderly in rural communities for renewal of all existing rental assistance contracts.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) The FDA receives a total of $3.1 billion in discretionary funding in the bill, $308 million above the 2018 enacted level. Total funding for the FDA, including revenue from user fees, is $5.57 billion. Within this total, the Committee provides a net increase of $303 million for medical product safety activities, including an increase of $5 million for the new Oncology Center of Excellence. The bill’s focus on medical product safety covers a broad spectrum of critical public health and safety matters – from $30 million to fight opioid abuse to $38.5 million to advance modern drug and biological product manufacturing in the U.S. to $27 million for the modernization of generic drug development and review. The intent of these funds is to support novel medical technology that will lower costs, provide higher quality, and deliver greater regulatory predictability.

The bill also appropriates $70 million to accelerate medical product development as authorized in the 21st Century Cures Act.

Agricultural Research The bill provides $3.101 billion – $72 million above fiscal year 2018 – for agriculture research programs, including the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture. This funding will support research at all ARS facilities to help mitigate and stop devastating crop diseases, improve food safety and water quality, increase production, and combat antimicrobial resistance. Continued investment in ARS buildings and facilities is included to ensure researchers have the facilities needed to maintain a safe, stable, and abundant food supply. This funding also includes important research investments in U.S. land-grant colleges and universities and for the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s premier competitive research program.

Animal and Plant Health – The legislation includes $998.4 million – $16.5 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level – for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. This funding will support programs to help control or eradicate plant and animal pests and diseases that can be crippling to U.S. producers.

The funding level provides increases that will help address harmful pests and diseases such as citrus greening disease and spotted lantern fly while maintaining increases over the past two years for feral hogs, Roseau cane activities, low pathogenic avian influenza indemnity, and wildlife damage management. 

Conservation Programs – The bill provides $1.05 billion to help farmers, ranchers, and private forest landowners conserve and protect their land. This includes $160 million for infrastructure rehabilitation to help small communities meet current safety standards for watershed projects.

Farm Programs The legislation provides $1.713 billion for farm programs, which is $8.5 million above the fiscal year 2018 level. This includes funding for the new Farm Production and Conservation Business Center as proposed by the Secretary’s reorganization for streamlining administrative and support function in the mission area. This funding will continue support for various farm, conservation, and emergency loan programs, and will help American farmers and ranchers. It will also ensure customer service through full staffing of local county Farm Service Agency offices, including additional funding for farm loan officers, and meet estimates of demand for farm loan programs.

Food Safety and Inspection Service The legislation includes $1.05 billion for food safety and inspection programs – a decrease of $7.5 million below the 2018 enacted level. These mandatory inspection activities help ensure the safety and productivity of the country’s $211 billion meat and poultry industry, and keep safe, healthy food on American tables. The funding provided will maintain nearly 8,500 frontline inspection personnel for meat, poultry, and egg products at more than 6,400 facilities across the country. 

Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) – Included in the bill is $255 million for the CFTC, which is $6 million above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This targeted increase will support cybersecurity initiatives, financial technology, and systemic risk examinations. This funding level will ensure robust swaps, futures, and options markets while prioritizing resources and giving flexibility for enforcement and market oversight.

International Programs – The legislation contains $1.92 billion for overseas food aid and to promote U.S. agricultural exports overseas. This includes $1.500 billion for “Food for Peace” grants and $207 million for the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition program. These programs seek to reduce chronic hunger and increase food security by providing American-grown food, transported by U.S. ships, to foreign countries in need of aid.

Food and Nutrition Programs – The legislation contains discretionary funding, as well as mandatory funding required by law, for food and nutrition programs within the Department of Agriculture. This includes funding for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and child nutrition programs.

  • Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) The bill provides $6 billion in discretionary funding for WIC, which is $175 million below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Because of robust prior-year funding and declining enrollments in the program, WIC has large carryover balances left over from previous years. Therefore, to make the best use of taxpayer dollars, the bill rescinds $300 million in these unobligated balances, which will have no impact on participation in the program.
  • Child nutrition programs The bill provides for $23.2 billion in required mandatory funding – which is outside the discretionary funding jurisdiction of the Appropriations Committee – for child nutrition programs. This is $1.1 billion below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level due to large carryover balances in the program. This funding will provide free or reduced-price school lunches and snacks for 31 million children who qualify for the program. The bill provides approximately $520 million for the Summer Food Service Program to ensure low-income children continue to receive nutritious meals when school is not in session. In addition, the bill continues funding for a pilot program that provides additional funds through SNAP or WIC electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards to ensure children in underserved communities receive food during the summer months.
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) – The bill provides for $73.2 billion in required mandatory spending for SNAP. This is $794 million below last year’s level and approximately the same as the President’s budget request. The total includes $3 billion for the SNAP reserve fund, equal to the President’s request, which is used to cover any unexpected participation increases.

For the draft bill text, please visit: https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP01/20180509/108287/BILLS-115HR-SC-AP-FY2019-Agriculture-SubcommitteeDraft.pdf

 

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American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses

2018/05/03

Witnesses: Angelique Albert, Executive Director, American Indian Graduate Center Ervin Carlson, President, InterTribal Buffalo Council J. Michael Chavarria, Governor, Pueblo of Santa Clara (Also Chairman of the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council, Inc. Dave Flute, Chairman, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation, Robert Flying Hawk, Chairman, Yankton Sioux Tribe Harold C. Frazier, Chairman, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Boyd Gorneau, Chairman, Lower Brule Sioux Tribe David Omar Kills A Hundred, Trustee II, Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe Tori Kitcheyan, Councilwoman, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska Brandon Mauai, Tribal Council Member, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Jennifer McLeod, Board Member, Association of Community Tribal Schools (ACTS) Lawrence T. Mirabal, Chief Financial Officer, Institute of American Indian Arts Kurt Riley, Governor, Pueblo of Acoma and Chairman of the Ten Southern Pueblo Governor’s Council in New Mexico Lester Thompson, Jr., Chairman, Crow Creek Sioux Tribe Roger Trudell, Chairman, Santee Sioux Tribe Ashley Tuomi, President, National Council of Urban Indian Health (NCUIH) Troy "Scott" Weston, President, Oglala Sioux Tribe Roger White Owl, Intergovernmental Affairs Liaison, Mandan Hidatsa and Arikara Nation Ryan Wilson, President, National Alliance to Save Native Languages Kathleen Wooden Knife, Council Representative, Rosebud Sioux Tribe Read More

American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses

2018/05/03

Witnesses: Russell Begaye, President, Navajo Nation Carrie L. Billy, President and CEO, American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) Edward Manuel, Chairman, Tohono O'odham Nation Stephen Roe Lewis, Governor, Gila River Indian Community Robert Miguel, Chairman, Ak-Chin Indian Community Terry Rambler, Chairman, San Carlos Apache Tribe Delbert Ray, President, Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community Tony Small, Vice Chairman, Ute Tribe of Utah Vinton Hawley, Chairman, National Indian Health Board Ahniwake Rose, Executive Director, National Indian Education Association Kevin R. Dupuis, Sr., Chairman, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Darrell Seki, Tribal Chairman, Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians Leander “Russ” McDonald, President, United Tribes Technical College Natasha Gourd, Project Coordinator, First Nations Women’s Alliance Mary Jane Miles, Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee Nathan Small, Chairman, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation Chad Abel, Division Administrator, Treaty Natural Resources Division, Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Jason Schlender, Vice-Chairman, Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians Joseph Wildcat, Sr., President, Lac du Flambeau Tribe Douglas Cox, Chairman, Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin Michael J. Isham, Executive Administrator Designate, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC) Shannon Holsey, President, Stockbridge Munsee Mohican Community Read More

POSTPONED: State and Foreign Operations Member Day

2018/05/01


Contact Information

H-307 The Capitol
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-2771
Fax 202-225-7771
appropriations.house.gov


Membership

Rodney Frelinghuysen

NEW JERSEY's 11th DISTRICT

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