Committee on Appropriations

Hal Rogers

Chairman Rogers: Appropriations Committee has “done our job”

2015/07/14

The House Appropriations Committee today cleared its 12th and final funding measure, marking the first time since 2009 that all Appropriations bills have been approved by the full Committee. 

Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers congratulated the Committee on its work.

"The Appropriations Committee has done its job. We got off to one of the earliest starts in history, held more than a hundred hearings and dozens of briefings, and conducted thoughtful and thorough analysis of every single discretionary line item in the budget. 

"With the approval of the 12th bill today, all committee work on funding measures is completed – the first time this has happened since 2009 – and this has been done at a rapid pace with several weeks left before the August recess. In addition, six Appropriations bills have been approved by the full House. I congratulate the Committee on this impressive work. 

"These 12 bills save taxpayer dollars by prioritizing funding and trimming back or eliminating areas of waste and inefficiency. They make tremendous strides to rein in executive overreach and bureaucratic red tape that infringes on the rights of Americans and stifles economic growth. Simply put, these are good bills that should be enacted into law. 

"With time dwindling before the end of the fiscal year, it is my hope that all sides can come together to find common ground on an overall budget agreement. While a short term funding extension may be needed to provide additional time for negotiations, it is my intention to shepherd all Appropriations bills to final completion as quickly as possible." 

 

#####

Read More

Appropriations Committee Passes Fiscal Year 2016 Homeland Security Bill

2015/07/14

The House Appropriations Committee today approved the fiscal year 2016 Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Appropriations bill on a vote of 32-17. The bill provides funds to secure the nation’s borders and enforce immigration laws, identify and protect against cyber threats, stop transnational criminals who smuggle drugs and people into the U.S., respond to natural disasters, and fight terrorism. In addition, the bill improves oversight of DHS to hold the agency accountable to the American people. 

The legislation provides $39.3 billion in discretionary funding for DHS, a decrease of $337 million below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and $2.1 billion below the President’s request. The bill does not contain funds to implement the President's executive action on immigration, and specifically bars the use of funds for these activities for the duration of legal proceedings on the issue.

Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers made the following statement on the bill:

“Safeguarding our homeland, strengthening our borders, enforcing our immigration laws, and protecting our people from terrorism and natural disasters – these are the core missions of this legislation,” Chairman Rogers said. “Now – as we face growing threats from groups like ISIL, domestic terrorists, and other perils yet unknown – we must remain vigilant. This bill will ensure an active and well-equipped frontline, a secure border, and strong intelligence and cybersecurity operations that are paramount to keeping our nation safe.”

Homeland Security Subcommittee Chairman John Carter also commented on the bill.

“I am proud that our bill focuses first and foremost on border security, law enforcement and fiscal responsibility,” Homeland Security Subcommittee Chairman John Carter said. “This bill rejects the President’s attempt to undermine our laws and uses the tax payers’ dollars in a fiscally responsible manner by promoting reforms within DHS, and reducing ineffectual offices and programs. Additionally, this bill requires the President to enforce current law as it is written, not as he would like to interpret it by executive order. We must provide for our nation’s security, and enforcement of the law, while exercising fiscal restraint, which is what this bill offers.”

The following amendments to the bill were approved by the full committee today:

Rep. Carter – The amendment made technical and other noncontroversial changes and additions to the report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Rooney – The amendment prohibits funding for TSA uniforms that include badges that resemble law-enforcement badges. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Culberson – The amendment requires ICE to detain Priority 1 and Priority 2 illegal aliens. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote. 

Rep. Yoder – The amendment prohibits certain state and local grants from going to “Sanctuary Cities.” The amendment was adopted on a vote of 28-21.

Rep. Aderholt– The amendment restates current law prohibiting federal funding for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to provide for abortions, except in certain life-threatening cases, rape, and incest. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 31-18.

Rep. Young – The amendment withholds $5 million in funding for ICE until ICE completes a congressional briefing on the status of local communities participating in the Priority Enforcement Program. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

The bill was approved on a vote of 32-17.

For the text of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-fc-ap-fy2016-ap00-hsecurity.pdf

For the bill report, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2016-hsecurity.pdf

For a summary, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394301

 

 

#####

Read More

Full Committee Markup - FY 2016 Homeland Security Appropriations Bill

2015/07/09

Purpose: FY 2016 Homeland Security Appropriations Bill Read More

Committee Approves the Fiscal Year 2016 Agriculture Appropriations Bill

2015/07/08

The House Appropriations Committee today approved the fiscal year 2016 Agriculture Appropriations bill on a voice vote. The proposed legislation funds important agricultural and food programs and services, including food and medical product safety, animal and plant health programs, rural development and farm services, marketplace oversight, and nutrition programs.

The bill totals $20.65 billion in discretionary funding, which is $175 million lower (1 percent) than the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and $1.1 billion below the President’s budget request. Including both discretionary and mandatory funding for various nutrition programs, the overall bill totals $143.9 billion. The legislation targets this funding to national programs that have the most benefit to the American people and the U.S. economy, while reducing inefficient, wasteful, or lower-priority programs and agencies. In addition, the bill contains several policy provisions to rein in regulatory overreach, such as unnecessary red tape that harms the livelihoods of farmers and ranchers and that impedes growth in vital U.S. industries. 

“This bill is first and foremost a bill to support our economy – it targets funding toward important American agricultural industries and the development of rural communities, and away from unnecessary red tape that hinders economic growth and harms the livelihoods of America’s farmers and ranchers,” House Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers said. “Importantly, the bill supports rural communities by funding basic rural infrastructure, providing vital loans to rural businesses, and helping those most in need with food and housing assistance.”

“The engine that drives the American economy is not necessarily built in factories but grown on American farms,” said Agriculture Subcommittee Chairman Robert Aderholt. "This bill puts resources to work in areas that not only help farmers, ranchers, and growers everywhere, but also supports rural economic development and infrastructure.”

The following amendments to the FY 2016 Agriculture Appropriations bill were adopted by the full committee today:

Rep. Aderholt – The amendment makes technical and non-controversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.  

Rep. Harris –The amendment would add a provision to grant legal protections from frivolous lawsuits to the users of partially hydrogenated oils until the compliance date issued by FDA. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. DeLauro – The amendment ensures U.S. food safety laws are protected in new trade agreements. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

The bill was adopted on a voice vote.

For a summary of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394279

For the text of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/UploadedFiles/BILLS-114HR-SC-AP-FY2016-Agriculture-SubcommitteeDraft.pdf

For the bill report, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2016-agriculture.pdf

 

 

#####

Read More

Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2016 Homeland Security Bill

2015/07/08

Today, the House Appropriations Committee released its proposed fiscal year 2016 Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Appropriations bill, which will be considered tomorrow by the subcommittee. The bill provides funds to secure the nation’s borders and enforce immigration laws, identify and protect against cyber threats, stop transnational criminals who smuggle drugs and people into the U.S., respond to natural disasters, and fight terrorism. In addition, the bill improves oversight of DHS to hold the agency accountable to the American people. 

The legislation provides $39.3 billion in discretionary funding for DHS, a decrease of $337 million below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and $2.1 billion below the President’s request. The bill does not contain funds to implement the President's executive action on immigration, and specifically bars the use of funds for these activities for the duration of ongoing legal proceedings on the issue.

Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers made the following statement on the bill:

“Safeguarding our homeland, strengthening our borders, enforcing our immigration laws, and protecting our people from the threat of terrorism and devastating natural disasters – this is the core mission of this legislation. It will target funds to these areas, making the most of each dollar, while trimming back programs that are lower-priority or that have not been proven productive,” Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers said. “And the bill holds the Department’s feet to the fire through strong oversight measures to ensure that it is following Congressional directives, spending wisely, and providing strong enforcement of our laws.”

Homeland Security Subcommittee Chairman John Carter also commented on the bill.

“I am proud that our bill focuses first and foremost on border security, law enforcement and fiscal responsibility,” Homeland Security Subcommittee Chairman John Carter said. “This bill rejects the President’s attempt to undermine our laws and uses the tax payers’ dollars in a fiscally responsible manner by promoting reforms within DHS, and reducing ineffectual offices and programs. Additionally, this bill requires the President to enforce current law as it is written, not as he would like to interpret it by executive order. We must provide for our nation’s security and enforce the law while exercising fiscal restraint, which is what this bill offers.”

Bill Highlights:

The bill provides $39.3 billion in discretionary appropriations for DHS. Within this total, the bill prioritizes funding for frontline security operations – including all operational, enforcement, intelligence, and threat-targeting activities, and the acquisition of essential tactical equipment and assets. The legislation also includes important investments in the fight against cyber threats and illegal narcotics, and provides full funding for FEMA to help with response and recovery efforts following disasters.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) – The bill contains $11.1 billion in discretionary appropriations for CBP  an increase of $417.7 million above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and $346.8 million below the President’s request. This funding level provides for 21,370 Border Patrol agents and 23,775 CBP officers – maintaining the largest staffing totals in history. In addition, the recommendation includes:

  • $784.9 million for critical air and marine operations on the U.S. border, which is $34.5 million above the fiscal year 2015 level and $37.5 million above the President’s request; and
  • $439.4 million for border security technology, which is $56.9 million above the fiscal year 2015 level and $66 million above the President’s request.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) – The bill provides $5.8 billion for ICE – a decrease of $157.8 million below the President’s request and $151.5 million below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Within this total, the legislation includes:

  • An increase of 604 agents and other support personnel to strengthen enforcement of immigration laws;
  • $1.9 billion – an increase of $3.8 million above the fiscal year 2015 level – for domestic and international investigation programs, including efforts to combat human trafficking, child exploitation, cybercrime, and drug smuggling. The amount provides for 100% screening of visa applications and includes an increase of $2 million to expand the Visa Security Program; and
  • $3.3 billion for detention and removal programs – a decrease of $172 million below the fiscal year 2015 level which included construction costs for a new ICE facility that was completed in February 2015. This funding level supports 34,040 detention beds and includes $109.7 million for alternatives to detention. It funds the 287(g) and Priority Enforcement Program, and directs ICE to prioritize the use of detention for family units in expedited removal proceedings. 

Transportation Security Administration (TSA)  The bill includes $4.65 billion for TSA – a decrease of $180.8 million below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. This level provides sufficient funds for important frontline operations, including full funding for privatized screening operations (a total of $166.9 million), and increases above the President’s request for Federal Flight Deck Officers (a total of $21.5 million) and canine enforcement teams (a total of $131.8 million).  

The bill institutes rigorous oversight and requires TSA to report on how it is addressing vulnerabilities within passenger security screening, equipment, training, and other protocols. Additionally, the bill urges TSA to expand and strengthen risk-based security initiatives to increase efficiency, improve security, and reduce costs.

Cybersecurity, Critical Infrastructure, and Communications  The bill includes a total of $1.6 billion for the National Protection and Programs Directorate – $82.2 million above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level – to protect critical infrastructure and prevent cyber-attacks. Within this amount, $798 million is provided to fund the deployment of the third-generation EINSTEIN system to help secure civilian (.gov) network traffic and to improve the Federal Network Security program to detect and prevent cyber-attacks and foreign espionage. Funds are also included to modernize emergency communications capabilities and to initiate the replacement of the Automated Biometric Identification System.

Coast Guard – The bill contains $8.5 billion for the U.S. Coast Guard – an increase of $133.7 million above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level, and an increase of $360.8 million above the President’s request. The bill sustains military pay and allowances, and improves readiness by denying the President’s requested cuts to priority programs that would have gutted vital Coast Guard operations, including counternarcotic activities.  This funding includes:

  • $6.9 billion - $76.8 million above the request – to increase readiness and improve quality of life, including funding for: operations and training; military personnel; aviation and cutter hours; and to significantly reduce the depot maintenance backlog; and
  • $1.3 billion – $284 million above the request – to modernize and recapitalize vessels and aircraft, including funding for: detailed design of the Offshore Patrol Cutter; procurement of a HC130-J aircraft; additional small response boats; and the procurement of six Fast Response Cutters. 

Secret Service – The bill provides $1.9 billion for the U.S. Secret Service – an increase of $239.8 million above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level – including additional funding for increased costs related to the 2016 Presidential election. The bill increases funding for investigations and cybersecurity, and continues funding for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, which the President proposed to eliminate. The bill also includes $24 million for needed facility improvements, including upgrades in the White House complex. 

FEMA – The bill fully funds FEMA’s stated requirement for disaster relief at $7.4 billion. The bill provides a total of $2.5 billion for first responder grants, equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted level, which includes: $1.5 billion for State and Local grants, $680 million for Assistance to Firefighter Grants, and $350 million for Emergency Management Performance Grants. The bill does not fund the President's request for $301 million for climate change initiatives.  

Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS) – The bill includes $119.7 million – a decrease of $4.8 million below the fiscal year 2015 level and $10 million below the President’s request – for E-Verify, a program that helps companies check if their employees may legally work in the United States. The legislation does not fund other CIS activities, as these are funded through the collection of fees. 

Specifically, the bill does not contain funds to implement the President's executive action on immigration, and bars the use of funds for these activities for the duration of ongoing legal proceedings on the issue.

Research and Development – The bill includes $786.9 million for Science and Technology, $8 million above the request, continuing to fund investment in high-priority research and development efforts.

Savings – The bill includes several provisions to save taxpayer dollars. For example, the bill cuts funds for a civilian pay raise, reduces the request by $505 million for staff positions that cannot be filled in fiscal year 2016, rescinds $250.6 million in unobligated balances from various accounts and $1.2 billion from the FEMA DRF in unused prior-year funding, rejects funds for a new climate change program, and denies the consolidation of DHS headquarters.

Funding Restrictions and Policy Provisions – The bill retains a prohibition on funds to transfer or release detainees from Guantanamo Bay and includes numerous restrictions to prevent waste and abuse.

For the complete text of the FY 2016 Subcommittee Draft Homeland Security Appropriations bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/UploadedFiles/BILLS-114HR-SC-AP-FY2016-HSecurity-SubcommitteeDraft.pdf

 

 

#####

Read More

Subcommittee Markup - FY 2016 Homeland Security Appropriations Bill

2015/07/06

Purpose: Mark Up Appropriations Bill, FY 2016 Read More

Chairman Rogers Floor Statement on H.R. 2822, the FY 2016 Interior Appropriations Bill

2015/06/25

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers gave the following statement in support of H.R. 2822, the Fiscal Year 2016 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill, on the House floor today:

"Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 2822, the Fiscal Year 2016 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill. 

"This legislation provides $30.17 billion in discretionary funding for programs that preserve and nurture our nation’s unique natural and cultural heritage. This fulfills our responsibility to the American taxpayers to provide funding for these important programs within a smart and sustainable budget.

"Our responsibility to the American taxpayers doesn’t end there, however. The people of this nation expect their government to act in a way that fosters economic development and job creation. This current Administration has been neglecting that duty, instead choosing to push a regulatory agenda that would create an environment hostile to economic growth, that would put our energy independence at risk, and that could cost thousands of hard-working Americans their jobs.

"So this bill takes the important steps to stop this harmful executive overreach. First and foremost, we limit funding for the Environmental Protection Agency – cutting its funding by 9 percent from last year. The bill also prohibits the EPA from implementing a litany of its egregious, expensive regulations, including applying new greenhouse gas regulations for power plants, updating existing ozone regulations, and changing the definitions of “navigable waters” and “fill material” – all of which could spell disaster for our economy.

"The bill also prevents the Bureau of Land Management from hampering economic growth by halting increases in oil and gas inspection fees, and from burdening ranchers with higher grazing fees.

"Provisions like these will help get the government out of the way of growth – preventing the overregulation and over-taxation of American business and industry, and keeping down manufacturing costs and utility bills for families across the country.

"In addition, this bill also focuses funding on other, important Department of the Interior and related programs. For instance, the bill creates a new $30 million program to help accelerate the reclamation of abandoned mine lands, boosting local community redevelopment.

"The bill also fulfills our moral and legal obligations to American Indians and Alaska Natives – increasing funding for programs that will help improve education systems, health facilities, and other infrastructure.

"And the bill prioritizes the prevention of and preparation for wildland fires, increasing funding for these programs bill-wide by $52 million.

"Overall, Mr. Speaker, we have a very fine appropriations bill before us today. I want to commend Chairman Calvert for his good work on this bill. He, the Ranking Member, and the Subcommittee have done a thorough job on this bill, and I am proud to support it. I also want to thank the staff for their work to bring this bill to the floor today.

"Before I close, I would like to take a moment to recognize one of my staff members, Mike Robinson, who will be moving on to greener pastures next week. Mike started working for me nearly 20 years ago and has had several tenures in my personal office. Four years ago, he joined the Appropriations Committee as Coalitions and Members Services Director. Many of my colleagues have gotten the chance to know Mike over these past four years. He has answered your questions, helped you offer amendments, and helped guide dozens of Appropriations bills to passage. He has been an integral part of the staff over the years, and we will miss him greatly when he departs. Thank you, Mike, for all of your hard work – we are very grateful.

"Mr. Speaker, this is an appropriations bill that puts our nation’s economy first. It preserves the role of the federal government, making sure the government is doing its job well – not in a way that intrudes into the lives of American businesses or the American people, but in a way that encourages our economy to grow and thrive. I urge my colleagues to support it today.

"Thank you, and I yield back."

 

#####

Read More

Chairman Calvert Floor Statement on H.R. 2822, the FY 2016 Interior Appropriations Bill

2015/06/25

House Appropriations Interior and Environment Subcommittee Chairman Ken Calvert gave the following statement  in support of H.R. 2822, the Fiscal Year 2016 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill, on the House floor today:

"Mr. Chairman, I’m pleased to bring to the floor H.R. 2822, the fiscal year 2016 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies appropriations bill. 

"As we begin, I want to personally thank Chairman Rogers for his leadership and support.  Under his guidance, the Appropriations Committee is again setting the standard for getting things done in the House.  The Interior bill is the seventh appropriations bill to come to the floor so far this year.

"I also want to thank my good friend and our ranking member, Ms. McCollum, for her partnership and work on this bill.  Finally, I want to thank each of our Subcommittee Members for their efforts and the collegiality that continues to be a hallmark of our Subcommittee’s deliberations.  Even though we may have differences of opinion within this bill, I greatly appreciate the Members’ constructive contributions—and I mean that sincerely.

"The Committee has made very difficult choices in preparing this bill.  As reported by the Appropriations Committee, the fiscal year 2016 Interior and Environment bill is funded at $30.17 billion which is $246 million below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and $3 billion below the budget request. We have made a sincere effort to prioritize needs within our 302(b) allocation.  I would like to point out a few of the highlights.

"Again this year, the Committee has provided robust wildland fire funding.  Fire suppression accounts at the Department of the Interior and the Forest Service are fully funded at the ten-year average level.  The hazardous fuels program was increased by $75 million—to $526 million—in the fiscal year 2015 enacted bill and that increase has been maintained in this bill.

"This bill also continues critical investments in Indian Country—a non-partisan priority of the Subcommittee.  Building upon the bipartisan work of former Subcommittee Chairmen Mike Simpson, Jim Moran, and Norm Dicks, this bill continues to make investments in education, public safety, and health programs in Indian Country. Overall, funding for the Indian Health Service is increased by $145 million (or three percent), while funding for the Bureaus of Indian Affairs and Education is increased by $165 million (or six percent) from fiscal year 2015 levels—the largest percentage increase in this bill. 

"This bill provides full funding in fiscal year 2016 for the Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) program.  PILT payments are made to 49 of the 50 states, as well as to the District of Columbia, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

"The bill provides $2.7 billion for the National Park Service, including more than $60 million in new funding relating to the Centennial of the Park Service.  

"We have also addressed a number of priorities within the Fish and Wildlife Service accounts.  The bill funds popular cost-shared grant programs above fiscal year 2015 enacted levels.  It also provides additional funds to combat international wildlife trafficking; protects fish hatcheries from cuts and closures; continues funding to fight invasive species; and reduces the backlog of species that are recovered but not yet de-listed.

"The bill provides $248 million for Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) programs that enjoy broad, bipartisan support.  Some Members would prefer more funding; others would prefer less funding for LWCF.  We have attempted to forge a middle ground that begins to return the emphasis of LWCF to its original intent of recreation, and State and local acquisitions. 

"Overall, funding for EPA is reduced by $718 million (or 9 percent) from fiscal year 2015 enacted levels.  Members from the Great Lakes region will be pleased to know that the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is maintained at the fiscal year 2015 enacted level of $300 million.  Rural water technical assistance grants and many categorical grants—including radon grants—are level funded at the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. 

"Again this year, there is a great deal of concern over the number of regulatory actions being pursued by EPA in the absence of legislation and without clear congressional direction.  For this reason, the bill includes a number of provisions to stop unnecessary and damaging regulatory overreach by the agency. 

"Before closing, I’d like to address the Endangered Species Act (ESA) provisions in this bill.  We have no interest in interfering with science or letting any species go extinct.  But, we are concerned about Federal regulatory actions lacking in basic fairness and common sense.  The provisions in this bill address problems created by an ESA driven—not by science—but by court orders that drain limited agency resources, and force the Department to cut corners to meet arbitrary deadlines.  Nowhere is this more evident than with sage-grouse.

"States are rightfully concerned that a listing, or unnecessarily restrictive Federal land use plans, will jeopardize existing conservation partnerships with States and private landowners. These partnerships are necessary to save both the sage-brush ecosystem and local economies. 

"So long as sage-grouse are not under imminent threat of extinction, cooperative conservation must be given a chance to work.  That is why this bill maintains a one-year delay on any decision to list sage-grouse, along with full funding to implement conservation efforts. 

"House consideration of this bill is the next step in a long legislative process.  I hope over the coming months we’ll come together—as we do each year—to find common ground.  In that spirit, I look forward to continuing to work with Ms. McCollum and the Members of the House on both sides of the aisle.

"In closing, I want to thank the staff on both sides for their hard work on this bill. On the minority side, I’d like to thank Rick Healy, Rita Culp, and Joe Carlile, as well as Rebecca Taylor.  They have played an integral role in the process and their efforts are very much appreciated.

"On the majority side, I’d like to thank the Subcommittee staff—Kristin Richmond, Jackie Kilroy, Betsy Bina (By-na), Jason Gray, Darren Benjamin, and Dave LesStrang.  I’d also like to thank Ian Foley, Rebecca Keightley, Alexandra Berenter, and Tricia Evans on my personal staff for their great work. 

"Mr. Chairman, this is a good bill and it deserves the support of the Members of this body."

Read More

Appropriations Committee Approves the Fiscal Year 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services Funding Bill

2015/06/24

The House Appropriations Committee today approved the draft fiscal year 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services (LHHS) funding bill on a vote of 30-21. The legislation includes funding for programs within the Department of Labor, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Education, and other related agencies.

In total, the draft bill includes $153 billion in discretionary funding, which is a reduction of $3.7 billion below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and $14.6 billion below the President’s budget request. Funding within the bill is targeted to proven programs with the most national benefit, including medical research, public health, and biodefense, as well as activities to ensure Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid services are efficient, effective, and accountable to those Americans they serve. While making these important investments, the bill reduces funding in lower-priority areas, and cuts ineffective or wasteful programs and agencies.

The legislation also contains several policy provisions to improve government oversight, protect the rights of all Americans, and bolster economic growth. These provisions will rein in unnecessary regulatory overreach that ties the hands of employers and undermines job creation, maintain longstanding life policies and constitutional protections, and ensure that taxpayer dollars are being appropriately spent. In addition, the legislation defunds existing ObamaCare programs and prohibits any new discretionary funding from being used to further implement ObamaCare. 

“The funding in this bill is targeted to programs that are proven to produce results. The American people rely on these investments for life-saving research, protection from deadly outbreaks and bio-attacks, safe workplaces, and effective education systems,” House Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers said. “In addition, great efforts were made to ensure none of the funding in the bill is spent wastefully or inappropriately. This includes terminating unnecessary programs, trimming back lower-priority areas, and preventing tax dollars from going toward extreme, intrusive regulations that have a net negative effect on this nation.”

“This is a fiscally responsible bill that reduces discretionary spending by nearly $4 billion. At the same time, by carefully reprioritizing where taxpayer dollars are spent, the bill increases funding for important programs that benefit the American people. Specifically, funding is targeted to the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control, special education, Head Start, and a number of programs aimed at helping Native American youth. And through the inclusion of several important policy provisions, we have taken steps to rein in the excessive overreach of the Department of Labor and the National Labor Relations Board,” LHHS Subcommittee Chairman Tom Cole said. “This bill reflects the values and priorities of the American taxpayer, setting us on a path that will reduce the deficit while funding programs that make meaningful differences in the lives of Americans.”

The following amendments to the FY 2016 LHHS Appropriations bill were adopted by the full committee today:

Rep. Cole – The amendment makes technical and non-controversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.  

Rep. Roybal-Allard – The amendment designates $750,000 in funding within the Children and Families Services Programs account to be used for a Child Poverty Study. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Kilmer – The amendment adds report language urging the Department of Education to provide clear and timely guidance to local school districts on how to calculate tax rates for the purposes of receiving certain types of federal aid. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Harris – The amendment prohibits funding to implement or enforce a National Labor Relations Board ruling that allows certain groups of employees within a larger company to form separate unions. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Kaptur – The amendment adds report language directing the Secretary of HHS, in consultation with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), to provide a report on certain prescription drug costs for Medicare, Medicaid, and the VA, as well as comparisons of these costs to other countries. In addition, it directs HHS to review and report on steps taken to competitively reduce prescription drug costs since 2001. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote. 

The bill was adopted on a vote of 30-21.

For a summary of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394272

For the text of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-sc-ap-fy2016-laborhhs-subcommitteedraft.pdf

For the bill report, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2016-laborhhsed.pdf

 

###

Read More

RESCHEDULED: Full Committee Markup - FY 2016 Agriculture Appropriations Bill

2015/06/22

Purpose: FY 2016 Agriculture Appropriations Bill Read More

Full Committee Markup - FY 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Bill

2015/06/19

Purpose: FY 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Bill Read More

Appropriations Committee Approves Fiscal Year 2016 Financial Services Bill

2015/06/17

The House Appropriations Committee today approved the fiscal year 2016 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill on a vote of 30-20. The bill provides annual funding for the Treasury Department, the Judiciary, the Small Business Administration, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and several other agencies.

The bill totals $20.2 billion in funding – $1.3 billion below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and $4.8 billion below the President’s budget request. With this funding, the legislation prioritizes critical national programs to enforce U.S. laws, maintain a fair and efficient judicial system, and help small businesses grow. In order to make these targeted investments, the bill reduces or eliminates lower-priority programs and cuts funding to poor-performing agencies – including an $838 million reduction to the Internal Revenue Service.

In addition, the bill includes several important policy provisions to rein in Administration overreach, cut bureaucratic red tape, and protect the rights of the American people. For example, the legislation includes provisions to stop the IRS from further implementing the individual mandate under ObamaCare, to protect the right to free speech and political involvement, and to prohibit the Federal Communications Commission from implementing a net-neutrality order.

“This bill covers a wide swath of programs that enable our federal government to do its job. From preserving an open and fair judicial system, to investing in small businesses that help our economy grow, this bill does a great deal of good work, and I am proud to support it today,” Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers said. “The legislation also finds ways to rein in wasteful spending, targeting underperforming agencies for cuts that are both functional and commensurate with their actions.”

“Every day, Americans are making tough decisions about their own budgets and rightfully expect federal agencies to do the same. While it reflects a very tight budget, this bill makes investments to support economic growth and job creation through our small businesses, and to protect our citizens by strengthening the enforcement of laws and the administration of justice,” said Financial Services Subcommittee Chairman Ander Crenshaw. “In addition, the bill reduces funding for nonessential areas, and holds the Administration and the Internal Revenue Service more accountable to the taxpayer.”

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full committee today:

Rep. Crenshaw – The manager’s amendment makes technical and non-controversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Crenshaw – The amendment prohibits funding for the Financial Stability Oversight Council to designate non-banks as “systemically important financial institutions,” thereby imposing new regulations on their activities, without allowing non-banks to change their business practices prior to final designation. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 31-19.

Rep. Fattah – The amendment restores mail delivery standards to the July 1, 2012 level. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 26-23.

Rep. Culberson – The amendment prohibits funding for the IRS to audit a faith-based 501(c)3 organization, unless the audit is approved the IRS Commissioner.  The amendment was adopted on a vote of 30-19.

Rep. Womack – The amendment prohibits funding for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to issue a final rule on the use of arbitration until the Bureau conducts a thorough study. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Quigley – The amendment adds report language encouraging GSA to incorporate bird safe materials and design features for GSA-owned federal buildings. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Harris – The amendment stops the FCC  “joint sales agreements” rule for fiscal year 2016, which will allow local media outlets to continue to share equipment and advertising between stations. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 38-11.

Rep. Harris – The amendment prohibits funding for abortions through OPM-negotiated “multi-state qualified health plans” offered under Obamacare. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 29-18.

Rep. Palazzo – The amendment prohibits the District of Columbia from using federal or local funds to implement or enforce the Reproductive Health Non-Discrimination Amendment Act. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 28-22.

The bill was approved on a vote of 30-20.

For a summary of the bill, please visit: http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394251

For the text of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-sc-ap-fy2016-fservices-subcommitteedraft.pdf

For the bill report, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2016-fservices.pdf

 

#####

Read More

Appropriations Committee Releases the Fiscal Year 2016 Agriculture Appropriations Bill

2015/06/17

The House Appropriations Committee today released the fiscal year 2016 Agriculture Appropriations bill, which will be considered in subcommittee tomorrow. The proposed legislation funds important agricultural and food programs and services, including food and medical product safety, animal and plant health programs, rural development and farm services, marketplace oversight, and nutrition programs.

The bill totals $20.65 billion in discretionary funding, which is $175 million lower (1 percent) than the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and $1.1 billion below the President’s budget request. Including both discretionary and mandatory funding for various nutrition programs, the overall bill totals $143.9 billion. The legislation targets this funding to national programs that have the most benefit to the American people and the U.S. economy, while reducing inefficient, wasteful, or lower-priority programs and agencies. In addition, the bill contains several policy provisions to rein in regulatory overreach, such as unnecessary red tape that harms the livelihoods of farmers and ranchers and that impedes growth in vital U.S. industries. 

“This bill prioritizes funding on programs that support the health of our rural communities, the ability of our farmers and ranchers to put safe, cost-effective food on our tables, and the advancement and reliability of drugs and medical devices that save lives,” House Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers said. “And by stopping harmful and excessive regulations, the legislation also ensures that our food, drug, and financial industries remain the best in the world – helping to keep our nation strong and prosperous.”

“The engine that drives the American economy is not necessarily built in factories but grown on American farms,” said Agriculture Subcommittee Chairman Robert Aderholt. "This bill puts resources to work in areas that not only help farmers, ranchers, and growers everywhere, but also supports rural economic development and infrastructure.”

Bill Highlights:

The legislation focuses investments in programs that bolster U.S. agriculture, support rural communities, maintain food and drug safety, ensure sound markets, and provide nutrition for children, families, and seniors. In total, the bill provides $143.9 billion in both discretionary and mandatory funding – $3.2 billion below the President’s request and $3.8 billion below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Discretionary funding alone in the bill is $20.65 billion, $175 million below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.

Agricultural Research The bill provides $2.7 billion for agriculture research programs, including the Agricultural Research Service and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture. This funding will support research to help mitigate and stop devastating crop diseases, improve food safety and water quality, and combat antimicrobial resistance. This also includes important research investments in U.S. land-grant colleges and universities.

Animal and Plant Health – The legislation includes $871 million – $15 million above the President’s budget request and approximately the same as the fiscal year 2015 enacted level – for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. This funding will support programs to help control or eradicate plant and animal pests and diseases that can be crippling to U.S. producers. The increase will help address harmful outbreaks of citrus greening and highly pathogenic avian influenza.   

Conservation Programs – The bill provides $840 million to help farmers, ranchers, and private forest landowners conserve and protect their land. This includes $6 million in infrastructure rehabilitation funding to help small communities meet current safety standards for watershed projects.

Farm Service Agency (FSA) The legislation provides $1.5 billion for FSA, which is approximately the same as the fiscal year 2015 level and the President’s budget request. This funding will support the various farm, conservation, and emergency loan programs, and will help American farmers and ranchers with the implementation of the farm bill.

Rural Development The bill provides a total of $2.5 billion for rural development programs, which is $86 million above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. These programs help create an environment for economic growth by supporting basic rural infrastructure, providing loans to increase opportunities for rural businesses and industries, and helping balance the playing field in local rural housing markets.

  • Business and Industry Loans – The legislation includes a loan level of $920 million –the same as the fiscal year 2015 enacted level – for the rural business and industry loan program. This funding will help small businesses in rural areas, many of which face unique challenges due to local economic conditions.
  • Rural Infrastructure – The legislation includes responsible investments in infrastructure needs to help rural areas of the country access basic utilities. This includes $1.25 billion – the same as the fiscal year 2015 enacted level – for rural water and waste program loans, and $474 million for grants and costs, an increase of $9 million above current levels. In addition, $6.2 billion is provided for rural electric and telephone infrastructure loans, the same level as fiscal year 2015.
  • Rural Housing Loans and Rental Assistance – The bill provides a total of $24 billion in loan authority for the Single Family Housing guaranteed loan program, which is equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and the President’s request. In addition, the bill includes $900 million in direct loans – the same as the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and the President’s request. These loans provide low-income rural families – many of whom would have few loan options for purchasing a home because of their geographical location – with home loan assistance. In addition, $1.2 billion, an increase of $79 million above current levels, is provided for rental assistance for affordable rental housing for low-income families and the elderly in rural communities.

Food Safety and Inspection Service The legislation includes $1 billion for food safety and inspection programs – approximately the same as the 2015 enacted level. These mandatory inspection activities help ensure the safety and productivity of the country’s $186 billion meat and poultry industry, and keep safe, healthy food on American tables. The funding provided will maintain more than 8,000 frontline inspection personnel for meat, poultry, and egg products at more than 6,400 facilities across the country. 

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) The FDA receives a total of almost $2.6 billion in discretionary funding in the bill, an increase of $30 million over the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Total funding for the FDA, including revenue from user fees, is $4.6 billion – $106 million above fiscal year 2015. Within this total, food safety activities are increased by $41.5 million, and medical product safety activities are increased by $4.2 million. 

The bill also includes a policy provision delaying the implementation of a new menu labeling regulation by a year, to give restaurants, local supermarkets, grocery stores, and similar retail establishments adequate time to comply with the law.

Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) – Included in the bill is $250 million for the CFTC, the same as the 2015 enacted level and $72 million below the President’s budget request. 

International Programs – The legislation contains $1.8 billion for overseas food aid and to promote U.S. agricultural exports. This includes $1.4 billion – a $17 million increase above the President’s request – for “Food for Peace” grants, and the requested level for the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition program. These programs seek to reduce chronic hunger and increase food security by providing American-grown food, transported by U.S. ships, to foreign countries in need of aid.

Food and Nutrition Programs – The legislation contains discretionary funding, as well as mandatory funding required by law, for food and nutrition programs within the Department of Agriculture. This includes funding for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and the Child Nutrition programs. The bill also includes a policy provision that will ensure any new USDA Dietary Guidelines focus only on food and nutrients and have a sound scientific evidence base.

  • Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) The bill provides $6.5 billion in discretionary funding for WIC, which is $139 million below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and the President’s request. The reduction reflects USDA’s estimates of declining enrollments in the program, and will not prevent any eligible participant from receiving benefits. The legislation also includes $55 million for management information systems and for states to transfer from paper vouchers to a more efficient electronic benefit transfer (EBT) system that will help identify waste or abuse within the program.
  • Child nutrition programs – The bill provides for $21.5 billion in required mandatory funding – which is outside the discretionary funding jurisdiction of the Appropriations Committee – for child nutrition programs. This is $207 million above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. This funding will provide free or reduced-price school lunches and snacks for 30.3 million children who qualify for the program. The bill continues existing provisions that allow schools demonstrating a financial hardship to seek an exemption from the whole grain nutrition standards, and prevents the implementation of further sodium reduction standards until the latest scientific research establishes the reduction is beneficial for children.
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) – The bill provides for $81.7 billion in required mandatory spending – which is outside the discretionary funding jurisdiction of the Appropriations Committee – for SNAP. This is $184 million below last year’s level and $2 billion below the President’s budget request, due to declining enrollment. The total includes $3 billion for the SNAP reserve fund, $2 billion below the President’s request, which is used to cover any unexpected participation increases. In addition, the bill includes provisions to increase congressional oversight of administrative activities and expenses, such as nutrition research and evaluations.

 

For the text of the subcommittee draft bill please visit: http://appropriations.house.gov/UploadedFiles/BILLS-114HR-SC-AP-FY2016-Agriculture-SubcommitteeDraft.pdf

#####

Read More

Appropriations Committee Approves Fiscal Year 2016 Interior and Environment Bill

2015/06/16

The House Appropriations Committee today approved the fiscal year 2016 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill, on a vote of 30-21. The legislation includes funding for the Department of the Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Forest Service, the Indian Health Service, and various independent and related agencies.

In total, the bill includes $30.17 billion in base funding, a decrease of $246 million below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and a reduction of $3 billion below the President’s request. Included is $452 million to fully fund “Payments in Lieu of Taxes” (PILT) – which provides funds to local communities with federal land to help offset losses in property taxes – and $3.6 billion for the Department of the Interior and U.S. Forest Service to prevent and combat devastating wildfires.   

In addition, the legislation contains several policy provisions to stop job-crushing bureaucratic red tape and regulations at federal agencies – such as the EPA – that stymie growth, hurt businesses both large and small, and damage the U.S. economy.

“This bill supports important Department of Interior and environment programs that protect and promote our natural resources within a responsible, sustainable budget,” Chairman Hal Rogers said. “The bill also preserves the role of the federal government – making sure that the government is doing its job well, while ensuring that it is not harmful or intrusive into the lives of the American people or our economy.”

“This bill represents difficult decisions to allocate resources to important federal programs, while operating under a tight budget caused by the Administration’s unwillingness to address our national debt,” Interior Subcommittee Chairman Ken Calvert said. “In addition, the bill takes meaningful steps to shield our economy and defend American jobs from the executive overreach of EPA regulators, provides significant funding for our national resources, and fulfills our commitment to the needs of Indian Country. And, as a Californian, I have seen firsthand how devastating earthquakes can be, so the bill prioritizes funding for the potentially-lifesaving Earthquake Early Warning System.”

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full committee today:

Rep. Calvert – The Manager’s amendment makes technical and non-controversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Reps. Visclosky –The amendment changes bill language requiring that all iron and steel used in water infrastructure projects be sourced within the United States. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Amodei – The amendment adds report language clarifying the process for products to be designated as “made in America.” The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Jenkins – The amendment prohibits funding for the EPA to implement or administer updates to existing ozone regulations. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 31-20.

Rep. Cole – The amendment prohibits funding to implement, administer, or enforce a final rule titled "Hydraulic Fracturing on Federal and Indian Lands." The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Valadao – The amendment adds report language relating to the Delta Smelt and directs the Fish and Wildlife Service to complete a five-year status review of the species, as required by law. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote. 

The bill was approved on a vote of 30-21.

For a summary of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394247

For the text of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-fc-ap-fy2016-ap00-interior.pdf

For the bill report, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2016-interior.pdf

 

#####

Read More

Subcommittee Markup - FY 2016 Agriculture Appropriations Bill

2015/06/15

Purpose: Mark Up Appropriations Bill, FY 2016 Read More

Subcommittee Markup - FY 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Bill

2015/06/12

Purpose: Mark Up Appropriations Bill, FY 2016 Read More

Full Committee Markup - FY 2016 Financial Service and General Government Appropriations Bill

2015/06/12

Purpose: FY 2016 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Bill Read More

Full Committee Markup - FY 2016 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill

2015/06/11

Purpose: FY 2016 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill Read More

Subcommittee Markup - FY 2016 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Bill

2015/06/08

Purpose: Mark Up Appropriations Bill, FY 2016 Read More

Full Committee Markup - FY 2016 State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill

2015/06/03

Purpose: FY 2016 State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill Read More

Contact Information

H-307 The Capitol
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-2771
Fax 202-225-7771
appropriations.house.gov


Membership

Robert Aderholt

ALABAMA's 4th DISTRICT

Mark Amodei

NEVADA's 2nd DISTRICT

Ken Calvert

CALIFORNIA's 42nd DISTRICT

John Carter

TEXAS' 31st DISTRICT

Tom Cole

OKLAHOMA's 4th DISTRICT

Ander Crenshaw

FLORIDA's 4th DISTRICT

John Culberson

TEXAS' 7th DISTRICT

Charlie Dent

PENNSYLVANIA's 15th DISTRICT

Mario Diaz-Balart

FLORIDA's 25th DISTRICT

Chuck Fleischmann

TENNESSEE's 3rd DISTRICT

Jeff Fortenberry

NEBRASKA's 1st DISTRICT

Rodney Frelinghuysen

NEW JERSEY's 11th DISTRICT

Kay Granger

TEXAS' 12th DISTRICT

Tom Graves

GEORGIA's 14th DISTRICT

Andy Harris

MARYLAND's 1st DISTRICT

Jaime Herrera Beutler

WASHINGTON's 3rd DISTRICT

Evan Jenkins

WEST VIRGINIA's 3rd DISTRICT

David Jolly

FLORIDA's 13th DISTRICT

David Joyce

OHIO's 14th DISTRICT

Alan Nunnelee

MISSISSIPPI's 1st DISTRICT

Scott Rigell

VIRGINIA's 2nd DISTRICT

Martha Roby

ALABAMA's 2nd DISTRICT

Hal Rogers

KENTUCKY's 5th DISTRICT

Tom Rooney

FLORIDA's 17th DISTRICT

Mike Simpson

IDAHO's 2nd DISTRICT

Chris Stewart

UTAH's 2nd DISTRICT

David Valadao

CALIFORNIA's 21st DISTRICT

Steve Womack

ARKANSAS' 3rd DISTRICT

Kevin Yoder

KANSAS' 3rd DISTRICT

David Young

IOWA's 3rd DISTRICT

Recent Videos