Committee on Appropriations

Hal Rogers

Appropriations Committee Sends Joint House and Senate Letter to the White House Urging Action on Zika Funding

2016/07/14

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers, along with Senate Appropriations Chairman Thad Cochran and other senior members of the House and Senate committees, today sent a joint letter to President Obama urging White House action on Zika funding.

Senate Democrats today again blocked legislation that would immediately fund efforts to prevent and fight the spread of the Zika virus. Chairmen Rogers and Cochran wrote that given the critical need for these funds and absent the funding that was blocked today, the White House should “aggressively use funds already available to mount a strong defense against the virus.”

The full text of the letter is below:

July 14, 2016

President Barack Obama

The White House

1600 Pennsylvania Ave

Washington, DC 20500

 

Dear Mr. President:

Your Administration has asked Congress to provide additional resources to prepare for, and prevent, the spread of the Zika virus.  We have responded by both supporting the reprioritization of existing resources and passing through our respective chambers legislation that would provide additional Zika response funding.

On February 18, 2016, we called upon your Administration to repurpose available funds to be spent immediately to fight the disease.  On April 6, 2016, you did so through the use of existing authorities, repurposing $589 million for Zika response activities.  Given the urgency of your request, we were surprised last week when Politico reported the following based on information shared by Administration officials:  “The Obama administration has so far distributed only about one-sixth of the unspent Ebola funding that it diverted to combat the Zika virus.”  This money is available immediately to prepare for and combat Zika, yet is seemingly not being spent.

The House passed a conference report that would provide an additional $1.1 billion in emergency supplemental funding to continue to prepare for, and prevent, Zika both domestically and internationally.  It is unfortunate that Democrats have blocked action on this legislation in the Senate. The conference report provides the same amount of funding that every Senate Democrat previously supported.  It fully funds vaccine research, and increases funding for mosquito spraying and eradication, Zika surveillance, and advanced development of treatments and diagnostics.  The conference agreement provides the same access to health services as your supplemental request, contains no new prohibition on any health service, and expands access to health services in Puerto Rico beyond your initial request.

If Senate Democrats continue to block consideration of Zika legislation, we urge you to aggressively use funds already available to mount a strong defense against the virus.  We also note that the fiscal year 2016 appropriations bills allow the Administration access to additional funds. The Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services has transfer authority that can be used as an additional source for Zika preparedness.  The previous Secretary did not hesitate to use this authority to support the failing Affordable Care Act Exchanges.  The Secretary of State also has authority to reprogram funding to provide additional foreign assistance to address the Zika virus outside the United States.

We urge you to use available funding now to ensure our nation is prepared.

Sincerely,

Rep. Hal Rogers, Chairman, House Appropriations Committee

Sen. Thad Cochran, Chairman, Senate Appropriations Committee

Rep. Tom Cole, Chairman, House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services

Sen. Roy Blunt, Chairman, Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services

Rep. Kay Granger, Chairwoman, House Appropriations Subcommittee on State and Foreign Operations

Sen. Lindsey Graham, Chairman, Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on State and Foreign Operations


For a PDF of the letter, please click here.

 

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House Passes Fiscal Year 2017 Interior and Environment Bill

2016/07/14

The House today approved the fiscal year 2017 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill. The legislation includes funding for the Department of the Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Forest Service, the Indian Health Service, and various independent and related agencies.

In total, the bill provides $32.1 billion, $64 million below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and $1 billion below the President’s budget request. Included is $480 million to fully fund “Payments in Lieu of Taxes” (PILT) – which provides funds to local communities with federal land to help offset losses in property taxes – and $3.9 billion for the Department of the Interior and Forest Service to prevent and combat devastating wildfires. The bill also includes funding to help address the problem of lead in drinking water across the United States.

In addition, the legislation contains policy provisions to stop bureaucratic regulatory overreach that harm U.S. industries and hinder economic and job growth.

“This is a balanced bill that invests in federal programs to help address critical current needs and to guarantee a brighter future for our nation, and I’m proud that the House approved it today. It will rein in the federal bureaucracy to stop many harmful and unnecessary regulations that destroy economic opportunity and kill jobs. And it will fund programs to promote the responsible use of our natural resources, fight devastating wildfires, and improve the quality of life for families across the country,” House Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers said.

For a summary of the bill, please visit: http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394564

For the text of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-fc-ap-fy2017-ap00-interior.pdf

For the bill report, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2017-interior.pdf

 

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Chairman Rogers Hails Completion of all 12 Appropriations Bills in Committee

2016/07/14

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers today released the following statement after the Committee approved the Fiscal Year 2017 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill, the twelfth and final bill for the 2017 appropriations cycle:

“Today and over the past several months, the Appropriations Committee honored regular order, considering and approving every single one of the 12 annual appropriations bills. We held over a hundred hearings and marked up each one in subcommittee and full committee, with an open and thorough amendment process that let all voices be heard. I’m proud that we are fulfilling our congressional duty on behalf of the American people and funding the government responsibly. I look forward to continuing to move forward on these critical bills to get them through the House and Senate and signed into law.”

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Appropriations Committee Approves the Fiscal Year 2017 Labor, Health and Human Services Funding Bill

2016/07/14

The House Appropriations Committee today approved the draft fiscal year 2017 Labor, Health and Human Services (LHHS) funding bill. The legislation includes funding for programs within the Department of Labor, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Education, and other related agencies.

In total, the draft bill includes $161.6 billion in discretionary funding, which is a reduction of $569 million below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and $2.8 billion below the President’s budget request. Funding within the bill is targeted to proven programs with the most national benefit, including medical research, public health, and biodefense. The bill also includes new funding for a comprehensive approach to combatting the nation’s opioid epidemic, and to prevent and fight the spread of the Zika virus. To make these investments, the legislation saves taxpayer dollars by cutting funding in lower-priority areas, including ineffective or wasteful programs.

In addition, the legislation contains several policy provisions to improve government oversight and to block the Administration’s unnecessary and harmful regulations that hurt economic growth. The legislation also defunds existing ObamaCare programs and prohibits any new discretionary funding from being used to further implement ObamaCare. 

“This is the 12th and final Appropriations bill to be considered by the Committee this year. It follows the responsible lead of the legislation before it –  investing in proven, effective programs, rolling back over‑regulation and overreach by the Administration that kills American jobs, and cutting spending to save hard‑earned taxpayer dollars,” House Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers said. “It includes critical funding for health and disease research, pandemic preparedness, and jobs and education programs. These are investments that will help improve American lives now, and keep us on the path for a healthier and more productive future.”

“This bill achieves its goal of reducing discretionary spending by more than half a billion dollars, all the while prioritizing where funding is needed the most. Several important programs through the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health that benefit many Americans receive a substantial increase in funding, often well beyond the amount the President requested in his budget,” LHHS Subcommittee Chairman Tom Cole said. “More specifically, the bill includes additional funding dedicated to the Zika response effort, which gives the CDC director the ability to respond more quickly to the fight against Zika. Furthermore, this bill continues to fund numerous programs that many Americans rely on including Head Start, special education, community service, and Native American programs for well-being. This bill reflects the values and priorities of the American taxpayer. It will make a difference and improve the welfare of the American people,” Cole continued.

 

The following amendments to the FY 2017 LHHS Appropriations bill were adopted by the full committee today:

Rep. Cole – The amendment makes technical and non-controversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.  

Rep. Kaptur – The amendment adds report language directing the CDC to coordinate with other agencies and States on the public health effects of algal-blooms. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Ryan – The amendment adds report language directing the Bureau of Labor Statistics to conduct a study on the impacts of free trade agreements on the U.S. labor market. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Harris – The amendment specifies that any federal funding provided in any act of law may only be used to provide In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) treatments if such treatments do not result in the destruction of viable human embryos before embryo transfer. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 29-21.

Rep. Lee – The amendment adds report language requesting a Department of Education study on the adverse impacts of school segregation. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

The bill was adopted on a vote of 31-19.

For a summary of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394633

For the text of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-sc-ap-fy2017-laborhhs-subcommitteedraft.pdf

For the bill report, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2017-laborhhsed.pdf

 

 

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Chairman Rogers Floor Statement on H.R. 5538, the FY 2017 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill

2016/07/12

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers today spoke on the House floor in support of H.R. 5538, the Fiscal Year 2017 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill.

The text of his statement follows:

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 5538, the Fiscal Year 2017 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill.

This legislation provides nearly $32.1 billion for agencies charged with managing and protecting our natural resources and our federal lands, as well as Native American programs and other independent agencies.

Within this total, $3.9 billion is dedicated to fighting devastating wildfires – fully funding the 10-year average and increasing funding for programs that help prevent fires from happening in the first place.

The bill increases funding for our commitments to American Indians and Alaska Natives – addressing public safety, health, and education, among other important services.

For rural communities that have nontaxable federal lands – and as a result face huge budget shortfalls that would hurt local government functions – the bill provides full funding for the Payments in Lieu of Taxes program.

This legislation also makes good use of the congressional power of the purse – cutting the EPA by $164 million and slashing its regulatory programs to help stop the Administration’s heavy-handed, onerous regulatory agenda.

Communities across the country rely on coal and other energy production for good jobs, and hard-working Americans expect reasonable energy bills to take care of their families. Relief from the EPA’s job-killing regulations is paramount to the economic growth that our country desperately needs right now – so I’m proud that the bill takes the necessary steps to cut this red tape.

This includes prohibiting funds to change the definitions of “waters” under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act or to enforce the proposed Stream Buffer rule. The legislation also bars the EPA from implementing new greenhouse gas regulations on power plants, and provides flexibility for states to implement new ozone standards.

In all, this is a balanced bill that invests taxpayer dollars in the right priorities and protects against the Administration’s harmful regulatory policies – helping to ensure a brighter future for our nation.

I urge my colleagues to vote “aye” on H.R. 5538.

Thank you, and I yield back.

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Chairman Calvert Floor Statement on H.R. 5538, the FY 2017 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill

2016/07/12

House Appropriations Interior Subcommittee Chairman Ken Calvert today spoke on the House floor in support of H.R. 5538, the Fiscal Year 2017 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill.

The text of the statement follows:

Mr. Chairman, I’m pleased to bring to the floor H.R. 5538, the Fiscal Year 2017 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies appropriations bill. 

As we begin, I want to personally thank Chairman Rogers for his leadership and support.  I also want to thank my good friend and our ranking member, Ms. McCollum, for her partnership and work on this bill.  Finally, I want to thank each of our Subcommittee Members for their assistance and hard work on the legislation before us.   

The fiscal year 2017 Interior and Environment bill is funded at $32.095 billion which is $64 million below the FY16 enacted level and $1 billion below the budget request. 

The Committee has provided robust wildland fire funding in this bill.  Fire suppression accounts are again fully funded at the ten-year average level—which rose by $133 million from last year.  The Committee has also addressed concerns about forest health and active forest management, and provided a $30 million increase for hazardous fuels.

This bill also makes critical investments in Indian Country.  Overall, funding for the Bureaus of Indian Affairs and Education is increased by $72 million (or three percent), while funding for the Indian Health Service is increased by $271 million (or six percent) from fiscal year 2016 levels.  This is the largest increase in this bill. 

The bill also provides $2.9 billion for the National Park Service, including more than $65 million in new funding to address the maintenance backlog and other priorities related to the Park Service Centennial.   

The bill provides $480 million to fully fund “Payments in Lieu of Taxes” (PILT) in fiscal year 2017. 

We have also addressed a number of concerns within the Fish and Wildlife Service.  The bill continues funding for popular cost-shared grant programs.  It also provides additional funds to combat international wildlife trafficking; protects fish hatcheries from cuts and closures; continues funding to fight invasive species; and reduces the backlog of species that are recovered but not yet delisted.

The bill provides $322 million for Land and Water Conservation Fund programs that enjoy broad, bipartisan support. 

Funding for EPA is reduced by $164 million from fiscal year 2016 enacted levels.  Again this year, there is a great deal of concern over the number of regulatory actions being pursued by EPA in the absence of legislation and without clear congressional direction.  For this reason, the bill includes a number of provisions to stop unnecessary and damaging regulatory overreach by the agency.

Before closing, I’d like to make an additional point about the challenges facing Flint, Michigan, and other communities across the country addressing lead in drinking water.  This is an issue of great concern to Committee members.  It is not a partisan issue.

What occurred in Flint has called greater attention to aging infrastructure and the need for prudent management and oversight of water systems.  This bill provides targeted investments and prioritizes resources that will help the EPA and Michigan respond to Flint, and help other States and communities address the needs of their water systems. 

The bill provides an increase of $207 million above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund.  It also includes $50 million for the new Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation (WIFIA) program which may be leveraged through direct Federal loans or loan guarantees to fund $3 to $5 billion worth of water infrastructure projects nationwide. 

In addition, the bill provides increases for State grants for improved State oversight and operations of drinking water systems, and for communities to work on integrated plans for pipe replacement.  The bill also directs the GAO to assess the number of lead service lines by State. 

Lastly, the Committee is taking an additional step to provide relief to communities like Flint by including bill language that allows States to use State Revolving Fund dollars to forgive a portion of a community’s outstanding loans.  This, and the other steps taken in this bill, will have a real impact.  

Mr. Chairman, this is a good bill and it deserves Members’ support.   

 

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Committee Approves Fiscal Year 2017 State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill

2016/07/12

 The House Appropriations Committee today approved the fiscal year 2017 State and Foreign Operations Appropriations bill.

The legislation targets funding to U.S. foreign policy priorities, including programs that will address instability around the world. The bill focuses funding on the protection of American embassies and consulates, and support for the security of U.S. allies and partners – particularly those in strategic and vulnerable areas, including countries in the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa, and European countries facing Russian aggression. The bill also provides critical humanitarian aid to war-torn and impoverished areas around the globe and dedicates funds to address health threats overseas before they reach the United States. In addition, the legislation contains strong oversight measures and reductions to nonessential or lower-priority international programs to protect and save taxpayer dollars.

In total, the bill provides $52 billion in both regular discretionary and Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding. This total is $595 million below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and $691 million below the President’s request for these programs. Within this amount, OCO funding totals $14.9 billion, equal to the fiscal year 2016 enacted level, which will support operations and assistance in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and other areas of conflict and instability around the globe. 

“Radical ideologies and threats to the American way of life continue to emerge around the globe, and it is essential that the United States continue a robust, multi-pronged plan to fight our enemies. This must include a strong national defense, increased homeland security, and effective diplomatic strategies,” Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers said. “This bill will responsibly fund our security and diplomatic activities to advance this goal, provide support to our allies, and ultimately make our world safer and more humane.”

State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee Chairwoman Kay Granger said:

“In an increasingly dangerous and rapidly changing world, this national security bill prioritizes programs to ensure the security of the United States and our allies. ISIL and other terrorist organizations are a constant threat to Americans and our way of life. At the same time, we see Iran providing support to terrorists, China attempting to expand its territory, Russia continuing to take an aggressive posture toward its neighbors, and North Korea behaving in a dangerously unpredictable way. That is why we must use all the tools we have available to assert American leadership – through a strong national defense, as well as by supporting effective diplomatic and development programs,” Chairwoman Granger said. “This bill prioritizes funding for embassy security, democracy assistance, our strategic partners such as Israel, Jordan, and Ukraine, and life-saving health and humanitarian programs. Further, the bill spends less than last year by terminating or scaling back lower-priority programs and redirects those funds to higher priorities that promote our national security.”

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full committee today:

Rep. Granger – The manager’s amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Dent – The amendment modifies the quorum requirement for the Export-Import Bank Board through September 30, 2019. This is needed for the Bank to approve certain transactions as three of the five Board positions are currently vacant. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

The bill was approved on a voice vote.

For a summary of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394623

For the text of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-fc-ap-fy2017-ap00-stateforop.pdf

For the bill report, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2017-stateforop.pdf

 

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Full Committee Markup - FY 2017 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Bill and Report on the Revised Interim Suballocation of Budget Allocations

2016/07/08

To consider: Full Committee Markup of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Bill and Report on the Revised Interim Suballocation of Budget Allocations for FY 2017 Read More

House Approves Fiscal Year 2017 Financial Services Bill

2016/07/08

The House today approved the fiscal year 2017 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill. The bill provides annual funding for the Treasury Department, the Judiciary, the Small Business Administration, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and other related agencies.

The bill totals $21.7 billion in funding – $1.5 billion below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and $2.7 billion below the President’s budget request. The legislation targets resources to programs that will help boost economic growth and opportunity, protect consumers and investors, promote an efficient federal court system, and stop financial crime. To make these investments within a tight budget, the legislation reduces funding for lower-priority or underperforming programs and agencies. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS), which is reduced by $236 million, receives additional oversight and transparency requirements in the bill to ensure tax dollars are properly used and the agency is acting responsibly. Several other policy provisions are also included to promote good government and stop bureaucratic overreach that can slow economic growth.

“The House today passed a bill that prioritizes funding where it will be best used, and makes policy reforms that improve efficiency and accountability and rein in executive overreach,” House Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers said. “The legislation invests its funding in programs that will help Americans – help them grow small businesses and make their communities safer – while improving the way the government runs. I applaud its passage and look forward to working to get this important legislation enacted into law.”

For a summary of the bill, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394563

For the text of the bill, please visit:

 http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-sc-ap-fy2017-fservices-subcommitteedraft.pdf

For the bill report, please visit:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2017-fservices.pdf

 

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Full Committee Markup - FY 2017 State and Foreign Operations Bill and Report on the Revised Interim Suballocation of Budget Allocations

2016/07/07

To consider: Full Committee Markup of State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill and Report on the Revised Interim Suballocation of Budget Allocations for FY 2017 Read More

Chairman Rogers Floor Statement on FY 2017 Financial Services Appropriations Bill7/6/2016

2016/07/06

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers today spoke on the House floor in support of H.R. 5485, the Fiscal Year 2017 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill.

The text of his statement follows:

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 5485, the Fiscal Year 2017 Financial Services Appropriations bill.

This bill provides $21.7 billion in funding for financial services and Treasury programs, the federal judiciary, and small businesses. This total is $1.5 billion below current levels, and $2.7 billion below the President’s request.

Within this allocation, the bill prioritizes funding where it will be best used, and makes policy reforms that improve efficiency and accountability.

To start, the bill takes steps to address issues at the IRS – both cutting overall funding and including funding limitations to prevent the IRS from continuing their recent history of bad behavior. In total, the IRS is provided with $10.9 billion - $236 million below current levels. This holds the agency’s budget below FY08 levels – forcing the agency to streamline and focus on its core duties.

Taxpayer Services, however, are maintained at $2.1 billion, and an additional $290 million is directed to improve customer service, fraud prevention, and cybersecurity.

The bill also includes policy items to correct recent transgressions – including prohibiting funding for a regulation related to the tax-exempt status of 501(c)(4) organizations, which could limit the First Amendment rights of citizens, and prohibiting funds for bonuses unless conduct and tax compliance is considered.

The bill includes provisions throughout designed to make the government work better for the taxpayer. This includes increasing oversight by bringing the CFPB and the Office of Financial Research under the annual congressional appropriations process, and changing the leadership of CFPB from one director to a five-member panel.

The bill also peels back red tape across the government. This includes prohibiting the FCC from implementing the net neutrality order until court cases are resolved; requiring the FCC to refrain from continued activity on the set-top box rule until a study is completed; and prohibiting the SEC from requiring the disclosure of political contributions on SEC filings.

The bill invests its funding in programs that will protect Main Street Americans – helping them grow small businesses and making their communities safer.

The bill increases funding for federal courts, as well as for important and effective anti-drug programs like the Drug-Free Communities, and High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas programs.

The bill also includes $883 million for the Small Business Administration, including full funding for veterans programs, and increased funding above the President’s request for Women’s Business Centers. The bill also includes the SEC Small Business Advocate Act, to help small businesses address the unique issues they face due to their size.

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the Financial Services Subcommittee and the hard-working staff, the Ranking Member, Mr. Serrano, and particularly, the Chairman, Mr. Crenshaw. This will be his last bill at the helm of the Subcommittee and one of his last appropriations bills in Congress. Over his tenure on the Committee, he has been a faithful shepherd of taxpayer dollars and a dedicated servant to his District and to the nation. His presence will be deeply missed by the Appropriations Committee and the entire House.

Chairman Crenshaw’s final bill is certainly a high note to go out on. This bill improves the way the government runs, makes responsible use of federal funding, and invests in the right priorities.

I urge my colleagues to support the bill.

Thank you, and I yield back.

 

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Chairman Crenshaw Floor Statement on FY 2017 Financial Services Appropriations Bill

2016/07/06

House Appropriations Financial Services Subcommittee Chairman Ander Crenshaw today spoke on the House floor in support of H.R. 5485, the Fiscal Year 2017 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill.

The text of his statement follows:

Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to present to the House the fiscal year 2017 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill. As you know, this bill funds a diverse group of agencies and activities including financial regulators, tax collection, the White House, the Federal courts, the District of Columbia, the General Services Administration, and the Small Business Administration. This bill is the product of 8 hearings and more than 1,800 requests from Members on both sides of the aisle. 

The bill provides $21.7 billion in discretionary funding, which is $1.5 billion, or 6.5 percent, less than fiscal year 2016 and $2.7 billion, or 11 percent below the request.  The Subcommittee’s allocation is a significant reduction compared to 2016.  Nonetheless, the allocation is sufficient to fund vital Federal programs, as well as one-time set-asides for the expenses of the Presidential transition.

Law enforcement and the administration of justice are among the bill’s priorities.  Funding for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas and Drug-Free Communities programs are at record-highs, as is funding for Treasury’s Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, which enforces sanctions programs.  In addition, there’s a healthy amount of funding for both the Federal and DC judicial branches of government and for the supervision of offenders and defendants living within our communities. 

Another priority for the bill is supporting small businesses to grow the economy.  The bill provides $157 million for SBA’s business loan programs to support $28.5 billion in 7(a) lending and $7.5 billion in 504 lending.  The bill also provides record-high amounts of funding for the SBA grant programs in total, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, and Treasury’s Community Development Financial Institutions Fund program, which includes, for the first time, a set aside for CDFI’s that assist individuals with disabilities  to overcome barriers to financial services.

In order to fund these high priority programs at these levels, we had to reduce funding elsewhere. We cut funding for nearly two dozen agencies and programs that can operate with a little less, such as the Office of Management and Budget and the Federal Communications Commission.  The brunt of the reduction, however, is borne by GSA and IRS since they are the largest agencies in the bill and both have a recent history of inappropriate behavior.

While the bill reduces GSA funding for new construction by $1.1 billion, we provide a sizable amount for repairs and alterations to the existing Federal inventory in good shape. In addition, we continue to push GSA to develop an accurate inventory of Federal property and designate funding for GSA to use existing space more efficiently.

It has been three years and three Commissioners since we learned that the IRS betrayed the trust of Americans by applying inappropriate scrutiny to certain groups.  Instead of turning over a new leaf, the IRS made a series of embarrassing management mistakes at the expense of customer service.  To remedy this, the bill includes numerous provisions to reform the IRS and reduces their funding $236 million below the current level and $1.3 billion below the request.  Within the total for IRS, however, $290 million is set aside for the IRS to improve customer service, cybersecurity, and fraud prevention. 

To increase transparency and oversight of agencies, the bill makes the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Office of Financial Research subject to the appropriations process; changes the CFPB’s leadership from a single director to a five-member commission; and requires the Federal Communications Commission to make orders publically available for 21 days before the Commission votes on them.

To prevent agency overreach, the bill gives businesses the opportunity to change their operations prior to being designated a systemically important financial institution, requires further study of CFPB rules on pre-dispute arbitration and payday lending, requires court challenges to be resolved before the FCC implements the net neutrality order, prohibits the FCC from regulating broadband rates, and keeps financing for manufactured housing affordable.

In addition, this Committee has strong concerns that the FCC seems to be prolonging their pattern of regulatory overreach with its recent set-top box proposal.  And so, we include language that requires the FCC to stop and study this controversial rule before they can proceed any further with it.  The telecommunications industry is more competitive than ever.  And yet, the Commission has been more active than ever in trying to exert regulatory control over market innovation. To return the FCC’s focus towards mission critical work and away from politically charged rule makings, the bill requires the FCC to do less with less.

To give low-income families the option of selecting a school that best meets the educational needs of their children, the bill includes the text of the Scholarships for Opportunity and Results Act, which passed the House last month.  The bill also includes two other bills that passed the House this year.  One adapts the Bankruptcy Code for large financial institutions and the other establishes a Small Business Advocate within the SEC.

To conclude, I want to thank Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member Lowey for their leadership and support for advancing this bill.  I would especially like to thank Ranking Member Jose Serrano.  I know this is not the bill that he would present, but I appreciate Mr. Serrano’s approach to the Committee’s work and value his advice.  It has been my pleasure to work side-by-side with him over the years. 

I reserve the balance of my time.

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RESCHEDULED -Subcommittee Markup - FY 2017 State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill

2016/06/16

Purpose: Mark Up Appropriations Bill, FY 2017 Read More

Subcommittee Markup - FY 2017 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Bill

2016/06/16

Purpose: Mark Up Appropriations Bill, FY 2017 Read More

Conference - House and Senate Amendments to H.R. 2577

2016/06/14

To consider: House and Senate Amendments to H.R. 2577 Read More

Full Committee Markup - FY 2017 Interior and Environment Bill and Report on the Revised Interim Suballocation of Budget Allocations

2016/06/08

To consider: Full Committee Markup of Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill and Report on the Revised Interim Suballocation of Budget Allocations for FY 2017 Read More

Full Committee Markup - FY 2017 Homeland Security Bill

2016/06/08

To consider: Full Committee Markup of Homeland Security Appropriations Bill, FY 2017 Read More

Full Committee Markup - FY 2017 Financial Services and General Government Bill and Report on the Revised Interim Suballocation of Budget Allocations

2016/06/06

To consider: Full Committee Markup of Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Bill, FY 2017 and Report on the Revised Interim Suballocation of Budget Allocations for FY 2017 Read More

Subcommittee Markup - FY 2017 Homeland Security Appropriations Bill

2016/06/06

Purpose: Mark Up Appropriations Bill, FY 2017 Read More

Subcommittee Markup - FY 2017 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill

2016/05/19

Purpose: Mark Up Appropriations Bill, FY 2017 Read More

Contact Information

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appropriations.house.gov


Membership

Robert Aderholt

ALABAMA's 4th DISTRICT

Mark Amodei

NEVADA's 2nd DISTRICT

Ken Calvert

CALIFORNIA's 42nd DISTRICT

John Carter

TEXAS' 31st DISTRICT

Tom Cole

OKLAHOMA's 4th DISTRICT

Ander Crenshaw

FLORIDA's 4th DISTRICT

John Culberson

TEXAS' 7th DISTRICT

Charlie Dent

PENNSYLVANIA's 15th DISTRICT

Mario Diaz-Balart

FLORIDA's 25th DISTRICT

Chuck Fleischmann

TENNESSEE's 3rd DISTRICT

Jeff Fortenberry

NEBRASKA's 1st DISTRICT

Rodney Frelinghuysen

NEW JERSEY's 11th DISTRICT

Kay Granger

TEXAS' 12th DISTRICT

Tom Graves

GEORGIA's 14th DISTRICT

Andy Harris

MARYLAND's 1st DISTRICT

Jaime Herrera Beutler

WASHINGTON's 3rd DISTRICT

Evan Jenkins

WEST VIRGINIA's 3rd DISTRICT

David Jolly

FLORIDA's 13th DISTRICT

David Joyce

OHIO's 14th DISTRICT

Alan Nunnelee

MISSISSIPPI's 1st DISTRICT

Scott Rigell

VIRGINIA's 2nd DISTRICT

Martha Roby

ALABAMA's 2nd DISTRICT

Hal Rogers

KENTUCKY's 5th DISTRICT

Tom Rooney

FLORIDA's 17th DISTRICT

Mike Simpson

IDAHO's 2nd DISTRICT

Chris Stewart

UTAH's 2nd DISTRICT

David Valadao

CALIFORNIA's 21st DISTRICT

Steve Womack

ARKANSAS' 3rd DISTRICT

Kevin Yoder

KANSAS' 3rd DISTRICT

David Young

IOWA's 3rd DISTRICT

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