House Amendment to S. 2012, Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2016

H.Amdt. S. 2012

Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2016

Sponsor
Sen. Lisa Murkowski

Date
May 25, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
John Huston

Floor Situation

On Wednesday, May 25, 2016, the House will likely begin consideration of the House amendment to S. 2012, the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2016, under a rule. S. 184 was introduced on September 9, 2015, by Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and passed the Senate by a vote of 85 to 12 on April 20, 2016. The House will consider an amendment to S. 2012, which combines text of 37 House-passed bills, with certain modifications.

Bill Summary

The House Amendment to S. 2012 amends current law and authorizes activities, to be administered primarily by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Interior (DOI), in an effort to advance energy infrastructure development, modernization, and protection; enhance domestic energy security; and promote energy efficiency and government accountability. The bill combines the following 37 House-passed bills, with modifications, into the House amendment.

Both the Senate bill and the House Amendment address a broad array of energy policy issues but differ primarily in the authorization levels and scope, as S. 2012 includes several new authorizations, reauthorizations, and new grant authorities not included in the House amendment (weatherization assistance programs and vehicle technologies program are two examples). The bills also differ on approaches to energy efficiency. S. 2012 includes more expansive programs and standards, while the House Amendment focuses on regulatory reforms and federal agency energy efficiency.

Bills within the House Amendment that were considered under a rule:

H.R. 8, the North American Energy Security and Infrastructure Act of 2015 (passed the House by a vote of 249 to 147 on December 3, 2015)

Expedited Interstate Energy Project Review—The bill requires the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to expedite the review process for federal energy related applications, such as certain pipeline applications, and to make certain information regarding the process available on its website. This includes requiring FERC to identify all agencies considering an aspect of an application and set the schedule for review.[1]

According to the Committee, there is evidence that FERC lacks the ability to enforce agency decisional deadlines related to natural gas pipeline applications. To address this, the bill reinforces FERC’s role as the lead agency to coordinate concurrent permit reviews, establish timelines, and require transparency in the process.[2] The bill also makes various other changes to FERC’s authorization.

Natural Gas Export Authorization—The bill streamlines the regulatory process for authorizing liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports by establishing a 30-day deadline for DOE to act on applications at the conclusion of the review required by the National Environmental Policy Act.[3]

“DOE’s Office of Fossil Energy is responsible for authorizing the export of LNG from the U.S. Authorization may be granted if the export of LNG is determined to be consistent with the ‘public interest.’ […] Authorization is automatically determined to be in the public interest if the export will be made to a country with which the U.S. has a free trade agreement that provides national treatment for trade in natural gas. Otherwise, an export may be authorized after, among other things, the DOE provides public notice and opportunity for the public to comment on whether the authorization is in the public interest.”[4]

Rights-of-Ways (ROWs) for Natural Gas Pipelines—The bill requires the Secretary of the Interior to identify and designate National Energy Security Corridors for the construction of natural gas pipelines on Federal land. The bill specifically focuses on lands managed by the National Park Service (NPS) as the agency currently interprets that it does not have authority to grant ROWs for such use under current law. According to the Committee, “natural gas pipelines construction projects have been severely constricted in areas where pipeline ROWs must cross federal lands. Currently, the Mineral Leasing Act provides authority for the Secretary of the Interior to issue ROWs for pipelines on federal lands; however, NPS lands are explicitly exempt. For this reason, an applicant for a ROW is forced to seek Congressional authorization to obtain legal approval for a natural gas pipeline on NPS lands.”[5] This provision was inserted into the bill by the Rules Committee print, as it includes the text of H.R. 2295.

Energy Emergency Preparedness— The bill directs the Secretary of Energy to develop and adopt procedures to enhance communication and coordination between the DOE, federal partners, state and local governments, and the private sector to improve emergency response and recovery. The bill authorizes the Secretary to take emergency measures to protect the bulk power system or defense critical electric infrastructure, including ordering critical electric infrastructure owners and operators to take certain actions. The bill also provides for voluntary sharing and protection of critical electric infrastructure information between the private sector and the federal government, to work together to anticipate and address electric grid vulnerabilities.[6]

Strategic Transformer Reserve—The bill requires DOE to submit a plan to Congress evaluating the feasibility of establishing a Strategic Transformer Reserve for the storage of spare power transformers and other critical equipment to temporarily replace critically damaged power transformers. According to the Committee, “strategically-located spare large power transformers will diminish the vulnerability of the United States to multiple risks facing electric grid reliability, including physical attack, cyber-attack, electromagnetic pulse, geomagnetic disturbances, severe weather, and seismic events.”[7]

Energy Security—The bill creates an interagency task force to coordinate with Canada and Mexico on mutually-beneficial energy policy decisions affecting North America, as well as Trans-Atlantic and Trans-Pacific forums to improve collaboration with our allies regarding energy security.[8]

Energy Reliability—The bill also allows for improved maintenance, upkeep, and certain other measures relating to electricity rights-of-ways (ROWs) on U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands in an effort to increase electricity reliability and prevent forest fires. According to the Committee, “when a ROW is not properly maintained, a tree can grow into or fall on to a power line, causing fires and a domino effect of electricity blackouts.” Some of these electricity ROWs are not properly maintained which can cause significant and catastrophic damage if fire spreads to the surrounding lands.[9]

Federal Agency Energy Efficiency— The bill requires federal agencies to coordinate with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), DOE, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop an implementation strategy for the maintenance, purchase, and use of energy-efficient and energy saving information technologies. The bill also repeals a provision included in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 that requires a 100 percent reduction in “fossil fuel-generated energy,” such as coal and natural gas, in all new and modified federal buildings by the year 2030.[10]

Federal Energy Efficiency Programs—The bill requires the DOE to recognize voluntary verification programs for air conditioning, furnace, boiler, heat pump, and water heating products to demonstrate compliance with DOE energy efficiency and conservation standards and the Energy Star program. The bill also directs the Federal Trade Commission to initiate a rulemaking to develop Energy Guide labels that promote the smart grid capabilities of certain products.[11] The bill also promotes the continued development of energy-efficient appliances through the Energy Star Program by deterring class action lawsuits that could undermine participation in the program.[12]

Coordination of Energy Retrofitting Assistance for Schools—The bill directs DOE to establish a clearinghouse to disseminate information regarding available programs and financing mechanisms that could be used to help retrofit and build more energy-efficient schools.

H.R.2898, Western Water and American Food Security Act of 2015 (passed the House by a vote of 245 to 176 on July 16, 2016)—Major provisions of the bill highlighted below:

Emergency Drought Response—the bill provides Federal agencies operational flexibility during emergency drought situations to maximize Delta pumping levels while still satisfying the needs of protected species, as well as directs the Federal agencies to maximize the amount of water pumped south of the Delta during drought and for two subsequent normal water years. The bill also provides for an expedited permitting process for water transfers and the use of temporary barriers or operable gates to improve the quantity and quality of water available to certain water users.[13]

Expanding Infrastructure and Storage—the bill creates a “one-stop-shop” permitting process to expedite construction of non-federal surface storage facilities. Specifically, it requires the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to coordinate with appropriate Federal and state permitting agencies to ensure efficient issuance of certain permits relating to water storage and delivery. The bill also requires certain agencies to expedite and complete consideration of ongoing feasibility studies for water storage projects. Additionally, the bill allows irrigation districts, water utilities, and other similar state or local agencies that have entered into water project contracts with the Federal government to pre-pay amounts owed to the Federal government, which is currently prohibited by law.[14]

Water Rights Protection—the bill prevents Federal agencies from requiring certain entities to relinquish their water rights in order to use public lands. It also prohibits these agencies from requiring water users to apply for or acquire a water right in the name of the United States under state law as a condition or such a permit, and prohibits the Federal government from asserting jurisdiction over groundwater withdrawals or impacts on groundwater resources.[15]

Monitoring and Management of the Delta Smelt—the bill attempts to ensure that any changes made to operational pumping levels of water resources are based on the most accurate survey methods and best available science. The bill also requires the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to modify the methodologies used when calculating incidental take limits (ITL),[16] which are used to determine the viability of certain water projects, based on their impact to the protected fish, the Delta smelt.[17] Since 2008, government regulators have flushed approximately 1.4 trillion gallons of water into the San Francisco Bay, in an effort to protect the protected fish, the Delta Smelt.[18] In 2008, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued a rule, which claimed that delta water pumps, which deliver water to farmers in Southern California, were a major reason for the decline in the Delta Smelt population and provided certain regulations restricting pumping.

Salmonid Management—the bill requires Federal agencies to ease water project pumping restrictions by identifying management actions other than reductions in pumping that can be utilized to better contribute to salmon recovery. The bill requires these agencies to evaluate and quantify the benefit to salmon species from reductions in pumping and to consider alternative conservation measures including barriers to fish entrainment, habitat enhancements and predation control programs.[19]

H.R. 2406, the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) Act (passed the House by a vote of 242 to 161 on February 26, 2016)—The bill revises a variety of existing programs to expand access to, and opportunities for, hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting. According to the Committee, the bill aims to protect Second Amendment rights and ensure that future generations of Americans will have ample access to federal lands to hunt, fish, and recreationally shoot.[20] Reliable access not only sustains our nation’s rich outdoor sporting tradition heritage, it significantly benefits the men and women that make up the industries that support it.[21] This bill shares several titles with S. 405 (Murkowski), of which several provisions were included in Title X, Subtitle C of S. 2012.

H.R. 1937, the National Strategic and Critical Minerals Production Act of 2015 (passed the House by a vote of 254 to 177 on October 22, 2015)—The bill requires the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture to more efficiently develop domestic sources of the minerals and mineral materials that are of strategic and critical importance to the United States.

The production of minerals and mineral resources “is a key economic activity, supplying strategic and critical metals and minerals essential for agriculture, communication, technology, construction, health care, manufacturing, transportation, and the arts.”[22]  Specifically, “strategic metals and metal alloys are an integral component of aerospace, defense, and other critical infrastructure.”[23]

Although the United States is among the world’s leading producers of important metals and minerals, “U.S. mineral exploration stagnated or declined during most of the 1990s and 2000s while global mineral exploration trends were strongly positive.”[24]  The decline can be attributed, in part, to burdensome regulatory and administrative changes to the permitting process. This bill is designed to streamline the permitting process for mineral exploration and mining projects and allow the U.S. to develop these critical resources, thereby creating jobs, strengthening the economy, and enhancing national security.

H.R. 538, the Native American Energy Act (passed the House by a vote of 254 to 173 on October 8, 2015)— This bill is designed to facilitate the development of energy on Indian lands by reducing federal regulations that impede such development. “Tribes and individual Indian landowners regularly encounter obstacles not encountered by private and state landowners in the development of their lands.”[25]  Federal law generally requires approval by the Secretary of the DOI, though the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), “for a tribe or individual Indian to execute a lease agreement on land the United States holds in trust for the respective tribe or individual.”[26]  This approval requirement applies to energy development on Indian trust lands.

H.R. 2647, the Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2015 (passed the House by a vote of 262 to 167 on July 9, 2016)—The bill would streamline forest management projects to prevent catastrophic wildfire, quickly plant trees to reforest after wildfires, improve wildlife habitat and protect watersheds and water infrastructure.   The bill also creates new opportunities for states, tribes and communities to help with the management of federal forests.

Major provisions of the bill are as follows:

Promoting Resilient Forests– The bill authorizes expedited authorities to protect federal forests from insects, disease and catastrophic wildfire while also speeding the approval of projects that would protect watersheds, improve wildlife habitat and quickly plant trees to reforest after catastrophic wildfire.

Permanently Ends ‘Fire Borrowing’

The bill also permanently ends fire borrowing. Each year when the USFS runs out of appropriated funds to pay for firefighting, the agency must ‘borrow’ from other non-fire accounts.  This practice is disruptive and delays other important work on national forests.

State-supported Forest Management[27]The bill would allow states to contribute money to a new federal fund and, subject to appropriation of those contributions, direct the USFS to use the funds to carry out certain activities related to managing forests. Any proceeds generated by those activities also would be deposited in the fund.

Lawsuits Related to Certain Activities Related to Forest Management[28]– The bill would require would-be litigants who sue on collaborative, community-supported USFS projects to post a bond to cover the agency’s legal expenses.

Expedited Assessment, Implementation, and Completion of Reforestation Activities[29] The bill requires the Forest Service to complete a reforestation plan for federal lands adversely impacted by a large-scale catastrophic event within three months. The bill also requires that at least 75 percent of the impacted land must be reforested within five years after the event. Tribal Forestry Participation and Protection[30] The bill authorizes Indian tribes to  conduct forest management activities, with the approval of the USFS, on Federal lands to protect adjacent  tribal lands.The bill also requires the Secretary of the Interior to respond to tribal requests for forest management on agency lands within 120 days and to complete analysis within two years.

H.R. 1806, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2015 (passed the house by a vote of 217 to 205 on May 20, 2015)—The bill authorizes funding for specified research and education programs and grants totaling approximately $33 billion over the fiscal year 2016 to 2020 period. It reauthorizes civilian research programs in the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Office of Science and Technology Policy. This bill prioritizes basic research with targeted investments while staying within the cap set in law by the Budget Control Act for Fiscal Year 2016.

Title XXXIII  (Nuclear Energy Innovation Capabilities) of H.R. 4909, National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (passed the House by a vote of 277 to 147 on May 18, 2016)—The title reauthorizes certain DOE nuclear programs which include nuclear infrastructure, maintenance, research, and security programs.

Bills within the House Amendment that were considered under suspension of the rules:

H.R. 4583, To promote a 21st century energy and manufacturing workforce (passed the House by voice vote on February 29, 2016)—The bill requires the Secretary of Energy to prioritize education and training for manufacturing and energy-related jobs (both renewable and nonrenewable) in order to increase the number of skilled workers in the energy-sector.

H.R. 2080, To reinstate and extend the deadline for commencement of construction of a hydroelectric project involving Clark Canyon Dam (passed the House by voice vote on March 14, 2016)— The bill directs FERC to reinstate and extend for three years the license for Clark Canyon Dam hydroelectric project.

H.R. 2081, To extend the deadline for commencement of construction of a hydroelectric project involving the Gibson Dam (passed the House by a vote of 410 to 2 on March 15, 2016)—  The bill authorizes FERC to extend for six years the license for Gibson Dam hydroelectric project.

H.R. 4416, To extend the deadline for commencement of construction of a hydroelectric project (passed the House by a vote of 418 to 2 on March 16, 2016)—The bill authorizes FERC to extend for up to three consecutive two-year periods the license for the Jennings Randolph hydroelectric project.

H.R. 4434, To extend the deadline for commencement of construction of a hydroelectric project (passed the House by a vote of 417 to 2 on March 16, 2016)—The bill authorizes FERC to extend for up to four consecutive two-year periods the license for the Cannonsvile hydroelectric project.

H.R. 4411, To extend the deadline for commencement of construction of a hydroelectric project (passed the House by voice vote on March 14, 2016)—The bill authorizes FERC to extend for up to three consecutive two-year periods the license for the Gathright hydroelectric project.

H.R. 4412, To extend the deadline for commencement of construction of a hydroelectric project (passed the House by voice vote on March 14, 2016)—The bill authorizes FERC to extend for up to three consecutive two-year periods the license for the Flannagan hydroelectric project.

H.R. 404, To authorize early repayment of obligations to the Bureau of Reclamation within the Northport Irrigation District in the State of Nebraska (passed the House by voice vote on June 1, 2015)—The bill authorizes landowners within the Northport Irrigation District in the State of Nebraska to make early repayments of their obligations under a water contract with the Bureau of Reclamation. Landowners who repay their portion of the obligation will no longer be subject to federal acreage limitations and paperwork requirements.

H.R. 482, Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park Boundary Revision Act of 2016 (passed the House by voice vote on March 22, 2015)— The bill would allow land to be donated to the Ocmulgee National Monument and changes the designation of the Monument to the Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park.

H.R. 959, Medgar Evers House Study Act (passed the House by voice vote on September 16, 2015)—The bill authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a special resource study of the former home of the late civil rights leader, Medgar Evers. The bill requires the study to evaluate the national significance of the site and determine the suitability and feasibility of designating the site as a unit of the National Park System.

H.R. 979, To designate a mountain in the John Muir Wilderness of the Sierra National Forest as “Sky Point” (passed the House on by voice vote on June 1, 2015)—This bill designates an unnamed mountain in the John Muir Wilderness of the Sierra National Forest in California as “Sky Point,” to honor Marine Staff Sergeant Sky Mote.

H.R. 984, To amend the National Trails System Act to direct the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a study on the feasibility of designating the Chief Standing Bear National Historic Trail, and for other purposes (passed the House by voice vote on April 28, 2015)—The bill requires the National Park Service (NPS) to study the feasibility of designating the Chief Standing Bear Trail in the states of Nebraska and Oklahoma as a National Historic Trail.

H.R. 1289, the John Muir National Historic Site Expansion Act (passed the House by voice vote on September 16, 2015)—The bill authorizes the Department of the Interior to acquire by donation approximately 44 acres to include in the John Muir National Historic Site. The acreage to be donated by the John Muir Land Trust is directly adjacent to the current property boundary and will allow for better public access to trails.[31]

H.R. 1324, the Arapaho National Forest Boundary Adjustment Act of 2015 (passed the House by a vote of 381 to 30 on April 28, 2015)—The bill would modify the boundary of the Arapaho National Forest in Colorado to include an additional 93 acres of land, which is commonly referred to as “the wedge.” The bill authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture to acquire non-Federal lands within the expanded boundary.

H.R. 1541, the Preservation Research at Institutions Serving Minorities (PRISM) Act (passed the House by voice vote on November 30, 2015)—The bill makes Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs), and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-serving institutions (AANAPISIs), eligible for technical and financial assistance from the Secretary of the Interior under an existing grant program to establish preservation training and degree programs. The change would enable such students to engage in projects with the purpose of preserving their cultural and national heritage.

H.R. 1554, the Elkhorn Ranch and White River National Forest Conveyance Act of 2015 (passed the House by voice vote September 19, 2015)—The bill requires the U.S. Forest Service to convey 148 acres of land with disputed title in the White River National Forest (WRNF) in Colorado to a private entity. The bill allows the federal government to continue collecting rent and royalty payments from an existing federal oil and gas lease on the land.

H.R. 1949, the National Liberty Memorial Clarification Act of 2015 (passed the House by a vote of 402 to 0 on September 16, 2015)—The bill provides for the consideration and submission of site and design proposals for the National Liberty Memorial approved for establishment in the District of Columbia.

H.R. 2223, the Crags, Colorado Land Exchange Act of 2015 (passed the House by voice vote on September 16, 2015)—The bill requires the Secretary of Agriculture, acting through the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) to facilitate an equal-value land exchange, at the request of a private entity, of 82 acres of federal lands in the Pike National Forest for 320 acres of private lands in that forest. The purpose of this bill is to exchange National Forest System lands at Emerald Valley Ranch that have lost their National Forest character for private lands in the Pikes Peak region with high National Forest values.

H.R. 2288, To remove the use restrictions on certain land transferred to Rockingham County, Virginia (passed the House by a vote of 407 to 0 on November 30, 2015)—The bill removes the use restrictions on certain land transferred to Rockingham County, Virginia.

H.R. 2857, To facilitate the addition of park administration at the Coltsville National Historical Park, and for other purposes (passed the House by voice vote on March 22, 2016)— The bill would allow the National Park Service to select an alternative location for park administration and visitor services at the Coltsville National Historical Park.

H.R. 2880, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park Act of 2016 (passed the House by voice vote on February 24, 2016)—The bill redesignates the Martin Luther King, Jr., National Historic Site in the state of Georgia as the “Marin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park,” and replaces the current boundary map with a map of a proposed boundary revision dated June 2015.

H.R. 3004, To amend the Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Act to extend the authorization for the Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission (passed the House by voice vote on February 24, 2016)—The bill amends the Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Act to extend the authorization for the Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission through October 12, 2021.

H.R. 3036, the 9/11 Memorial Act (passed the House by a vote 387 to 12 on February 9, 2016)—The bill designates the National September 11 Memorial located at the World Trade Center in New York City, New York, as a national memorial.

H.R. 3371, the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park Boundary Adjustment Act of 2015 (passed the House by voice vote on February 24, 2016)—The bill modifies the boundary of the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park in Georgia to include approximately eight acres identified as Wallis House and Harrison Hill.

H.R. 3620, To amend the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Improvement Act to provide access to certain vehicles serving residents of municipalities adjacent to the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, and for other purposes (passed the House by voice vote on February 24, 2016)—The bill amends the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Improvement Act with respect to the prohibition against the use of Highway 209, a federally owned road within the boundaries of the Delaware Water Gap Recreation Area in Pennsylvania, by certain commercial vehicles except as they serve businesses physically located in towns adjacent to Highway 209.

H.R. 4119, the Gulf Islands National Seashore Land Exchange Act of 2016 (passed the House by voice vote on March 22, 2016)—The bill would allow the National Park Service to exchange 1.5 acres of land for 2.1 acres of land owned by the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5699.

H.R. 1475, the Korean War Veterans Memorial Wall of Remembrance Act of 2015 (passed the House by voice vote on February 24, 2016)— The bill expands upon the original design of the Korean War Veterans Memorial by authorizing a “Wall of Remembrance” with the names of those killed or wounded in theater, listed as missing, or prisoners of war during the Korean War.

H.R. 1214, the National Forest Small Tracts Act Amendments Act of 2015 (passed the House by a vote of 403 to 0 on September 16, 2015)—The bill expands the authority of the Secretary of Agriculture to sell or exchange small parcels of National Forest System land to enhance the management of the National Forest System.

H.R. 2791, the Western Oregon Tribal Fairness Act (passed the House by voice vote on September 16, 2015)—The bill requires certain federal lands be held in trust by the United States for the benefit of certain Indian tribes in Oregon. Land placed in trust for the Tribes may not be used for gaming under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, and timber harvested from such land shall be subject to federal law restricting the export of unprocessed logs.

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[1] See Energy and Commerce Committee, Full Committee Markup on H.R. 8, H.R. 3242 Background Memo, September 30, 2015.
[2] See House Report 114-347 at 62.
[3] See Committee on Energy and Commerce Markup; Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to H.R. 8 Section-by-Section Analysis, September 29, 2015.
[4] See CRS Report, “A Restriction on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Exports: An Actionable Subsidy Under WTO Rules?,” March 19, 2013.
[5] See House Report 114-285 at 3.
[6] See Energy and Commerce Committee, Full Committee Markup on H.R. 8, H.R. 3242 Background Memo, September 30, 2015.
[7] Id.
[8] See House Report 114-347 at 66.
[9] See House Report 114-287 at 6.
[10] See Committee on Energy and Commerce Markup; Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to H.R. 8 Section-by-Section Analysis, September 29, 2015.
[11] See Energy and Commerce Committee, Full Committee Markup on H.R. 8, H.R. 3242 Background Memo, September 30, 2015.
[12] Id.
[13] See H.R. 2898, Section-by-Section analysis.
[14] Id.
[15] Id.
[16] See Fish and Wildlife Service, “Issuance Criteria for Incidental Take Permits.”
[17] See H.R. 2898, Section-by-Section analysis.
[18] http://www.wsj.com/articles/forget-the-missing-rainfall-california-wheres-the-delta-smelt-1430085510
[19] Id.
[20] See House Report 114-377 Part 1
[21] Id.
[22] House Report 114-253, Part 1, at 1.
[23] Id. at 1 and 2.
[24] Id. at 2.
[25] See House Report 114-276 at 1.
[26] Id.
[27] Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate, “H.R. 2647, Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2015.”
[28] Id.
[29] H.R. 2647 section-by-section analysis at 3.
[30] Id. at 8.
[31] Id.

Background

In recent years, the United States has experienced dramatic increases in fossil fuel energy production, made possible in part by advancements in extractment technology. However, changing market dynamics, new regulations, and emerging threats have created new energy security and reliability challenges. The House Amendment to S. 2012 amends federal energy and natural resources laws to protect and grow the domestic energy sector.

 

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates for the House amendment to S. 2012, is not currently available.

 

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact John Huston with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 6-5539.