H.R. 596, To repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and health care-related provisions in the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, and for other purposes

H.R. 596

To repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and health care-related provisions in the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, and for other purposes

Date
February 3, 2015 (114th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
David Smentek

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, February 3, 2015, the House will consider H.R. 596, a bill to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and health care-related provisions in the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, and for other purposes, under a rule.  H.R. 596 was introduced on January 28, 2015 by Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-AL).

Bill Summary

H.R. 596 repeals, in full: 1) the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111-148); and 2) all healthcare-related provisions[1] in the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-152) 180 days after the bill’s enactment.  Under the bill, all provisions of law amended or repealed by either piece of legislation are restored or revived as if they had not been enacted.

Moreover, this legislation directs the Committees on Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, Education and the Workforce, and Judiciary to report to the House legislation proposing changes to existing law that: 1) foster economic growth and job creation by eliminating job-killing policies and regulations; 2) lower health care premiums through increased competition and choice; 3) preserve a patient’s ability to keep his or her health plan; 4) provide people with pre-existing conditions access to affordable health coverage; 5) reform the medical liability system to reduce unnecessary and wasteful health care spending; 6) increase the number of insured Americans; 7) protect the doctor-patient relationship; 8) provide states greater flexibility to administer Medicaid programs (while reducing costs under such programs); 9) expand incentives to encourage personal responsibility for health care coverage and costs; 10) prohibit taxpayer funding of abortions and provide conscience protections for health care providers; 11) eliminate duplicative government programs and wasteful spending; or 12) do not accelerate the growth of entitlement programs or increase the tax burden on Americans.

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[1] The “related provisions” referred to in the bill are Title I and Title II, Subtitle B of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act.

Background

On March 23, 2010, the Democratic House and Senate passed, and the President signed into law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The legislation passed by a vote of 219-212 (see Roll Call  #165).  Later on March 25, 2010, the Democratic House and Senate passed, and the President signed into law, H.R. 4872, the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, which passed by a vote of 220-207 (see Roll Call  #194).[2]  Among other things, the law requires that most individuals obtain health insurance or pay a penalty tax; requires employers with 50 or more full time employees to provide approved health care coverage or pay a penalty tax; establishes insurance exchanges through which individuals and families will receive taxpayer-funded premium subsidies; expands Medicaid; raids $716 billion from Medicare [3]; and imposes 21 additional taxes on health insurance plans, medical devices, businesses, families, and individuals at a cost of $1.1 trillion.[4]  CBO’s January 2015 estimate puts the puts the total cost of coverage at $2 trillion, far more than the President’s promise to keep costs under $1 trillion.[5]

Since the beginning of the 112th Congress, the House has voted nearly 60 times to repeal, defund, or dismantle PPACA in full or in part.[6]  This includes three full repeal votes on January 19, 2011 (passed by a vote of 245-189 – see Roll Call #14); July 11, 2012 (passed 244-185 – see Roll Call #460); and May 16, 2013 (passed by a vote of 229-195 – see Roll Call #154).  The House voted to repeal PPACA on four additional occasions in the FY 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015 Budget Resolutions.[7]   As a result of these efforts, several bills have been enacted that directly repeal or rescind funding from provisions of PPACA.[8]

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[2] The Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 amended certain provisions of PPACA through the reconciliation process.
[3] See http://energycommerce.house.gov/press-release/just-days-ahead-obamacares-3rd-anniversary-committee-releases-scorecard-of-laws-broken-promises
[4] See http://waysandmeans.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=322006.
[5] https://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/43900-2015-01-ACAtables.pdf
[6] C. Stephen Redhead and Janet Kinzer, Legislative Actions to Repeal, Defund, or Delay the Affordable Care Act, Congressional Research Service (Oct. 28, 2014).
[7] See H.Con.Res.34 (FY 2012 Budget Resolution); H.Con.Res.112 (FY 2013 Budget Resolution); H.Con.Res.25 (FY 2014 Budget Resolution); and H.Con.Res. 96 (FY 2015 Budget Resolution.
[8] See http://www.speaker.gov/general/seven-house-passed-bills-president-obama-signed-repeal-or-defund-parts-his-health-care-law

Cost

A CBO cost estimate is currently unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions or further information contact the GOP Conference at 5-5107