H.R. 3460, to suspend until January 21, 2017, the authority of the President to waive, suspend, reduce, provide relief from, or otherwise limit the application of sanctions pursuant to an agreement related to the nuclear program of Iran.

H.R. 3460

To suspend until January 21, 2017, the authority of the President to waive, suspend, reduce, provide relief from, or otherwise limit the application of sanctions pursuant to an agreement related to the nuclear program of Iran.

Date
September 11, 2015 (114th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Jerry White

Floor Situation

On Friday, September 11, 2015, the House will consider H.R. 3460, a bill to suspend until January 21, 2017, the authority of the President to waive, suspend, reduce, provide relief from, or otherwise limit the application of sanctions pursuant to an agreement related to the nuclear program of Iran, under a closed rule.  H.R. 3460 was introduced on September 9, 2015 by Rep. Peter Roskam (R-IL) and was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and in addition, to the Committees on Financial Services, the Judiciary, Oversight and Government Reform, and Ways and Means.

Bill Summary

H.R. 3460 suspends, until January 21, 2017, the authority of the President to waive, suspend, reduce, provide relief from, or otherwise limit the application of sanctions pursuant to an agreement related to the nuclear program of Iran.

The bill also prohibits the President from removing any foreign person listed in Attachment 3 or 4 to Annex II of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action from the list of specially designated nationals and blocked persons maintained by the Office of Foreign Asset Control of the Department of the Treasury.

Background

For more than two decades, Congress has developed and passed strong economic sanctions against Iran in response to Iran’s nuclear program, chemical and biological weapons programs, development of ballistic missiles, and support for terrorism.  These statutory sanctions recently brought the Iranian regime to the negotiating table to discuss the parameters of its nuclear energy and weapons programs. Included in these statutory sanctions are various national security waiver authorities and other provisions that the President has declared he will use to suspend sanctions on Iran as part of any final nuclear deal.[1]

On July 14, 2015, Iran and the six nations that have negotiated with Iran over its nuclear program (the United States, United Kingdom, France, Russia, China, and Germany—collectively known as the P5+1) finalized the JCPOA. The agreement, ostensibly designed to limit Iran’s nuclear program to peaceful purposes, would provide broad relief from U.S., European Union (EU), and United Nations (UN) sanctions.

Click here for a detailed summary and analysis of the agreement provided by the Committee on Foreign Affairs and here for a Congressional Research Service report on selected issues surrounding the agreement.

Passage of this legislation and its signature into law would prevent the President from implementing the agreement.

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[1] See Senate Committee on Foreign Relations—“The Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015,” Background and Key Details.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate is currently unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jerry White with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.